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    Thread: Small red dot in my decayed tooth

    1. #1
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      Default Small red dot in my decayed tooth

      I am waiting to see a special needs oral surgeon as my oral surgeon tells me I am too phobic to work on..
      In the meantime my #2 molar (not a wisdom) has broken off at the gumline and is black with decay. (has been for about 2 years).

      Today I noticed a small red dot on the inside of the tooth area near the gumline. It sometimes tastes mildly like blood;
      About 3 days ago this recent Oral Surgeon gave me three injections when he attempted to extract this tooth; he injected the tooth and also the of my mouth. After he did, I panicked (cried and trembled), and that is when he told me to find a special needs surgeon.

      My question is..... what could this red blood dot *possibly* be?

      Could it be from the injection?
      Or sound like something else?

      I am terrified of my abscess coming back. I was on 20 days worth of Amoxicillin in November and it made me violently ill. While the tooth isn't giving off a foul taste or swelling like it did when it was abscessed, it is still irritated...but that's nothing new.... except this red dot..... please help me shed some light on this so I stop panicking until I see my new oral surgeon??

      Thank you

      Andrea
      Last edited by Camisa; 13th December 2009 at 22:10.

    2. #2
      Join Date
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      Default Re: Small red dot in my decayed tooth

      Hi Andrea,

      I'm sorry to hear you had such a traumatic experience. You did your best but you can't help the way your body reacts to the situation. I am sure the special needs oral surgeon will be able to help you get through the extraction. He will probably have a more empathetic manner and possibly use some form of sedation.

      Of course it is very difficult to diagnose the red spot from your description alone. Most likely it is a small patch of decayed tooth. These are often very light brown in colour which can look reddish. If this is the case it will not cause you any problems as the tooth is already dead. I think the most important thing to do is to have the tooth extracted before the abscess starts to return.

      Hope this helps

      Lincoln

    3. #3
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      Default Re: Small red dot in my decayed tooth

      Hi drhirst,

      thank you for your time, it means a lot to me.

      The red dot turned into what looks like more of a red blood vessel. It is definitely "blood red." I wondering if it is just a vein amongst my decayed tooth which has broken off at the gumline. There is no actual tooth material where it is but it is very small.
      I agree no matter what the tooth needs to come out and I am hoping that the other OS is more experienced with "speciall needs" patients as they advertise..

      I am a little confused on the controversy over Nitrous Oxide. Many say it relaxes them so much and if that is the case I want to go that way because there is less risk and I hate the idea of IV sedation. But some websites have information that say it might not be "enough." How does someone know when enough is "enough?"

      Thank you so much, again, for your time.

      Andrea
      Last edited by Camisa; 16th December 2009 at 00:43.

    4. #4
      Join Date
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      Default Re: Small red dot in my decayed tooth

      Hi,

      If it's not on the tooth but in the gum tissue then it might be granulation tissue which is a type of tissue found in areas of infection. This inflammatory tissue is very rich in tiny blood vessels. It will disappear when the tooth is extracted.

      Nitrous Oxide sedation works best when the patient has a good rapport with the dentist and is confident in his abilities. In your case IV sedation may be more appropriate as it can be racked up to the required level and is not dependent on your rapport with the surgeon.

      Hope this helps

      Lincoln

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