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    Thread: do loose teeth have to be removed?

    1. #1
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      Default do loose teeth have to be removed?

      question: does your teeth have to be loose from gum problems before they
      need to be extracted if there aren't any other problems other than needing
      a deep cleaning?

    2. #2
      Join Date
      Dec 2005
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      Default Re: loose teeth

      Hi Elaine, Im sorry I dont really understand the question! Do you mean do teeth need to be loose for an extraction to be done?

    3. #3
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      Default Re: loose teeth

      sorry if I didn't explain correctly. Does a person's gum disease have to be bad enough to loosen your teeth before extractions become necessary or could they
      still be tight and still need extraction because of the disease?


    4. #4
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      Default Re: loose teeth

      Thanks Elaine! I just quickly googled and it came up with this,

      Tooth extraction is done when gum disease has loosened or severely damaged a tooth.

      An extraction is necessary when gum disease has damaged a tooth so badly that there is no other way to prevent the infection from spreading and damaging nearby teeth and bones.Removing a tooth prevents gum disease from spreading and damaging nearby teeth and bones.

      If you delay having a damaged tooth removed, your gum disease can spread and cause you to lose more teeth.

      Not sure if this helps or not but thought it was worth a try for you!


    5. #5
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      Default Re: loose teeth

      Where did you find that? I have some issues with it...

      Gum disease only loosens teeth, it causes no other kind of damage.
      The next paragraph is nonsense. Removing teeth will not prevent further damage. Periodontal disease is a plaque induced autoimmune disease, it's not actually an infection as such and so removing the "source" of the infection is pointless.

      --
      Despite appearances to the contrary, Gordon has been a qualified dentist for over thirty years.

    6. #6
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      Mar 2006
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      Default Re: loose teeth

      Gordon, thanks for answering my question. So if your teeth are not loose they
      can still be saved? I've read where even slightly loose teeth can firm back up
      with scaling/root plaining. Please give any insight you may have.

      Elaine

    7. #7
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      Default Re: loose teeth

      Quote Originally Posted by Gordon
      Where did you find that? I have some issues with it...

      Gum disease only loosens teeth, it causes no other kind of damage.
      The next paragraph is nonsense. Removing teeth will not prevent further damage. Periodontal disease is a plaque induced autoimmune disease, it's not actually an infection as such and so removing the "source" of the infection is pointless.

      Sorry about that, i just typed into google and it came up with that, Sorry if it was wrong info, Like I said I didnt know if it would help, I guess it didnt, maybe I will leave the dentistry questions for you dentists!

    8. #8
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      Mar 2006
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      96

      Default Re: loose teeth

      Nat no problem. You were just trying to help.

      Gordon another question: if gum disease only loosens teeth then how does
      gum recession occur if not caused from plaque build up becoming gum
      disease?

      Thanks
      Elaine [smiley=grouphug.gif]

    9. #9
      Join Date
      Oct 2005
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      Default Re: loose teeth

      Nat, no problem and no offence meant. I think it just goes to prove you can't trust everything you find on Google

      The other stuff. Yes, if teeth are slightly loose then you can sometimes see a bit of firming after plaque control. It's also possible to splint the loose ones to firmer teeth to extend their lifespan, it's also possible just to continue with slightly loose teeth, given much improved plaque control then they can continue slightly loose for ever.
      Gum recession is multifactorial (oooh, big word for this time at the weekend!).

      Basically the plaque stimulates an autoimmune reaction which damages the supporting structures, the bone round the teeth gets removed and heads up towards the root end, the gum may stick around the bone and you get recession or else it stays around the neck of the tooth and you get a pocket...
      --
      Despite appearances to the contrary, Gordon has been a qualified dentist for over thirty years.

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