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    Thread: Temporary Crown Causing Gum Pain and Swelling

    1. #1
      Join Date
      Dec 2010
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      Default Temporary Crown Causing Gum Pain and Swelling

      I got a temporary crown put in last week and it started giving me pain a couple days ago. The pain is constant, but only really throbs after moving my mouth (especially for smiling). So I go to the dentist today, they put a numbing cream (Colgate Orabase) on the swollen gums, and sent me on my way with a sample packet of the cream to use as needed. The numbing cream helps, but I don't know if it's just masking the pain or actually helping for the long run.

      I look online to read more about my problem and came across a post about how temporary crowns made with acrylic can irritate the gums, even to the point where the placement of the permanent crown can be affected. I also read another post about how this irritation could be something called crown invasion and that crown lengthening to remove extra gum tissue and file down the tooth bone is the only way to solve this gum pain and swelling.

      Did my dentist do the proper thing by just giving me a numbing cream? I'm thinking maybe I should give the cream a few days and then go back to the dentist if the pain and swelling is still there. I've had one other crown done a couple years ago by another dentist and didn't have this complication.

    2. #2
      Join Date
      Oct 2005
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      Default Re: Temporary Crown Causing Gum Pain and Swelling

      What you're talking about is Biologic Width encroachment by the crown. A very controversial subject amongst dentists, many of whom don't believe it exists at all.

      Some of the temp materials can be a bit irritating to the tissues and so can the temp cements, so it may be that. Your dentist has had the benefit of seeing your mouth and thinks the cream is the right thing, I'm not going to argue with him without even seeing you

    3. The Following User Says Thank You to Gordon For This Useful Post:

      jaime (15th May 2012)

    4. #3
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      Default Re: Temporary Crown Causing Gum Pain and Swelling

      Thanks for replying. I really do hope it's just the materials in the temporary crown causing me trouble. And I hope this irritation doesn't last for the duration of having this temp crown on; my appointment to get the permanent crown isn't for another 3 weeks.

    5. #4
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      Dec 2010
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      Default Re: Temporary Crown Causing Gum Pain and Swelling

      Oh, and that Biologic Width encroachment thing...I tried looking it up and it appears to be beyond my layman's scope of understanding. I do find it intriguing, with the controversy and all. (I wonder if my dentist would look at me like I had 3 eyes if I brought the subject up.) What's your view on it?

    6. #5
      Join Date
      Dec 2011
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      Default Re: Temporary Crown Causing Gum Pain and Swelling

      Hi I have the same problem. I got some crowns on my top teeth and my whole top gum is swollen and thick. It was not thick like this before I have the crown. It also have this bumpy blister stuff on the back of the the very near the gumline. The crown teeths is also very sensitive. I accidently chew on some straws lightly and it hurt so bad. I cant even eat food using my crown teeth on the front top side even after nearly 5.5 months since crown installment.
      There's no pain when not letting anything touch it but stuff touch it... so sensitive that it hurt.

      I felt so regret that after the crown it seems to worsen the situation while when didn't have the crown.... no problem well only the ugly cosmetic hole on teeth haha so I had to get a crown.

      I think someone here mention about the something about "violate width crown" to me before when I asked this similar question. My original front teeth was very gappy as in not very close together but after I got the crown, now my front teeths is very near together so maybe this "width violate" might be why. I am not sure if it is crucial or how important for it to be fixed. I paid alot for my crowns now I dont think I can afford to get it fix by a specialist.
      Last edited by FreshCool; 16th May 2012 at 22:29.

    7. #6
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      Dec 2010
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      Default Re: Temporary Crown Causing Gum Pain and Swelling

      I feel for you, FreshCool. I got my first crown put in a couple of years ago and it took at least a year before it stopped being sensitive and I could chew regularly on that crown. It just out of the blue stopped causing me trouble. Weird, huh? I hope you can get yours resolved sooner.

      Have you tried taking an NSAID? I took an Aleve the other night because I was sore from walking and it ended up relieving the pain and swelling around my temporary crown. Wasn't expecting that, but I guess it makes sense for the inflammation.

      That crown width violation thing is interesting. My mouth feels so crowded and tight since getting this temp crown, like I have braces on again. Can you still get floss in between your crowns? I flossed last night even though the dentist said not to with a temp crown and I could still get floss in, though, so I don't know what's going on.

    8. #7
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      Jan 2012
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      Default Re: Temporary Crown Causing Gum Pain and Swelling

      I hope when you get your permanent crown put on it is a more comfortable fit. I wish you well.

      GOOD LUCK with your future dental appointments.

    9. #8
      Join Date
      Oct 2005
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      Default Re: Temporary Crown Causing Gum Pain and Swelling

      You're getting a bit confused with this biologic width stuff.

      Basically the theory is that you need a certain minimal distance between the top of the bone of the tooth's socket and the edge of the gum. Since crown margins at the front are usually placed down below the gumline to hide them, then the theory goes that this may encroach onto that minimal space, causing inflammation and irritation.

      It's nothing to do with how tight or close the crowns are together.

      I'm sceptical about it, it does make a certain amount of sense, but there are other things that could cause it. Hence the controversy among dentists

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      Carys (17th May 2012), Pianimo (18th May 2012)

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