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    Thread: dry socket risk,  prevention,  warning s

    1. #1
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      Default dry socket risk,  prevention,  warning s

      Okeee.. haven't seen this posted, and I looked (maybe not hard enough??) anyhooo...
      extraction without suture yesterday....

      worried about dry socket today..
      want to know::

      **what are warning signs of it happening (my jaw is sore, not the extraction site)... I'm pretty sure the blood clot is still there...
      **when does risk of dry socket END... ie = how long post-extraction ?? 24-48-72 hours or longer??
      **if I even THINK I'm getting dry socket, what can I do (as this is the weekend, and I"m a paranoid dork to begin with...) to prevent it (if preventable) or self treat till Monday morning when DR office opens??

      umm.. That's it for now, I suppose... the time frame for risk, and self-treatment are my biggest worries...
      Give a man a fish, you feed him for a day; Teach him to use the internet - he'll never bother you again.

    2. #2
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      Default Re: dry socket risk, *prevention, *warning s

      Usually the area will be sore for about 3-4 days after the extraction. *If after that time the pain starts getting worse instead of better and is like a severe pain in the jaw accompanied by a foul odor in your mouth, that might be a dry socket (alveolar osteitis - osteo = bone, itis = inflammation). *There may or may not be evidence of a greenish ooze coming from the socket.

      You would definitely know if you had a dry socket since it's quite an intense pain which can shoot down the jaw. *Some people can mistake normal pain associated with the extraction to be a dry socket which in reality isn't. *With any extraction there can be pain around the area, and that is normal. *Pain that is growing worse over time associated with a really bad odor / taste in the mouth is not typically normal.

      I find dry sockets tend to occur anywhere from 5-7 days after the extraction. *After that the likelihood of it happening is fairly rare. *You can help avoid a dry socket by not rinsing too aggressively. *This helps prevent dissolving the protective blood clot. *Avoid smoking, drinking alcohol, and rinsing with alcohol containing mouthrinses. *Get plenty of rest, food, and liquids. *Avoid eating over the socket area if possible. *Do not suck or blow through a straw or blow your nose too aggressively. *Some people advise rinsing gently with a salt water mixture which helps keep bacteria levels down. *Personally I just tell people to try to avoid rinsing too much at all.

      It's an uncommon occurance, but if it does happen, you may try to take painkillers like Motrin to alleviate the pain and salt water rinses to try to kill some of the bacteria. *It is best to have the dentist examine the area if you suspect a dry socket occuring.

      In Google we trust:

      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/dry...778/DSECTION=9
      Cheese, Gromit, where's the Cheeeese???

    3. #3
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      Default Re: dry socket risk, *prevention, *warning s

      sorry for stealing this thread but i have just had two pulls, they were pulled 23rd - 10:30, now i have really saw gums near the area and whole mouth sort of aches, also at the same time i had 5 fillings so im guessing that wont help the pain... also overnight i do still get little bit of waterd down blood.

      i know pain is to be exspected but is the blood and the pain 48 hours after is normal , im probbley worrieing about nothing, but its the first removals i have had so it all seems a bit strange to me.

      Exspecily worried about the little bit of blood, but it is very faint color so not hevey bleeding

      Views

      Dave

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      Default Re: dry socket risk, *prevention, *warning s

      Hey Dave,

      It's a little difficult to tell since it's still a little early. I would say don't worry about the little bit of blood since slight bleeding can still occur. It tends to mix with the saliva so a little often looks like more that it really is.

      Where were the extractions done, and where were the fillings done? I can tell you that I've seen maybe one dry socket in an upper tooth in my entire career. They mostly occur in lower socket areas. If your extractions were upper teeth, you probably don't have to worry about a dry socket occuring.

      I would suggest taking some painkillers and trying to give it a bit more time to see if it will start getting better. It's just hard to tell what's going on since you've had a mix of work done at the same time. If it's really getting quite bad, call your dentist and ask him what he suggests since he knows exactly what work he did, how deep the fillings were, etc..
      Cheese, Gromit, where's the Cheeeese???

    5. #5
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      Default Re: dry socket risk, *prevention, *warning s

      Quote Originally Posted by Zzzdentist
      Hey Dave,

      It's a little difficult to tell since it's still a little early. *I would say don't worry about the little bit of blood since slight bleeding can still occur. *It tends to mix with the saliva so a little often looks like more that it really is.

      Where were the extractions done, and where were the fillings done? *I can tell you that I've seen maybe one dry socket in an upper tooth in my entire career. *They mostly occur in lower socket areas. *If your extractions were upper teeth, you probably don't have to worry about a dry socket occuring.

      I would suggest taking some painkillers and trying to give it a bit more time to see if it will start getting better. *It's just hard to tell what's going on since you've had a mix of work done at the same time. *If it's really getting quite bad, call your dentist and ask him what he suggests since he knows exactly what work he did, how deep the fillings were, etc..
      Thanks for the reply , i really wish i new about this forum years ago, both the extractions were at the top ,, one was 3rd in from right (my right) and the other was far far left (my left)... the pains not really bad just like a mild headache but in the gum lol

      Cheers

      Dave

    6. #6
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      Default Re: dry socket risk, *prevention, *warning s

      [smiley=grouphug.gif]

      Dave - steal away - I'm good with it, that's what the boards are for - you see something that applies to you and you jump on in..

      My extraction was a lower left molar & it's been about 6 days I suppose. I'm still achy and I a bit frightened to eat a LOT of solid food.. I'm still taking the percocet at night to help sleep, and 800-1600mg of Ibuprofen during the day, if needed (anywhere from 2 200mgs to 8 200mg tablets - dont' get worried i'm over-dosing ...

      Keep yourself hydrated, and do the salt-water rinse starting today (man oh man does the salt water rinse feel GOOOOD, and helps with pain, and dislodging any food particles, and cleaning the area)

      [smiley=grouphug.gif]
      Give a man a fish, you feed him for a day; Teach him to use the internet - he'll never bother you again.

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