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A partial denture for Christmas...any advice appreciated

RustyRebecca

RustyRebecca

Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2019
Messages
95
Location
Plymouth
I have had so many problems with my front tooth, with so many dentists saying different things and others just ignoring me.
My front tooth has to be removed. There isn't another option. I do not have my canines as they were removed as a child.
I have already had impressions done with a dentist and paid for the actual partial denture which comprises of 5 teeth. My front one, the canines and two others a little further back.
I am not sure how big/thick the denture is. I have tried so many other dental technicians to try to get a small, thin one made but basically I have got nowhere, so this is my reality now. On the 20th December, my front tooth will be removed, along with a small one and the denture put in straight away.
Time has passed though. This denture was made in the Summer.
I am so worried and anxious about the actual appointment; the teeth removal, the denture being fitted. Everything.
What if I can't cope with it?
What if I can't remove the denture when needed to?
Will it even fit?
What if I get panicky for the entire procedure?
I am hyper sensitive which is why I am so worried about not getting used to the denture. What if I panic with the denture in?
Not be able to swallow well, talk, eat, etc.
The thought of what might be a bulky thing in my mouth constantly makes me feel ill.
Not to mention the grief/loss of my front tooth.
How do I brush my teeth?
How do I...this just goes on and on!
The thought of having a missing front tooth makes me feel so distressed and ashamed.
Christmas will be fun...mashed potato please.
Help!
P.S I am aware on one positive. I will be able to smile with teeth for once (if I feel like smiling, that is).
 
G

Getoutmymouth

Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2022
Messages
62
Location
Uk
I wish I had advice but I feel for you. Im having my last bottom molar out as it’s cracked and infected, on dec 28th which can’t come soon enough and I won’t have any teeth I can eat on so expect a denture will be where I’m heading too as implants are just not affordable.

I’m concerned about dentures hurting and being uncomfortable but wishing away time to get this pulled out.
 
drhirst

drhirst

Super Moderator
Verified dentist
Joined
Dec 7, 2008
Messages
778
Location
Welwyn Garden City, UK
Hi RustyRebecca,
All the many concerns you have listed are valid, and I have seen patients have some of these issues in similar situations over the years.
I would say that the vast majority of patients adapt to a plastic partial denture if they have too. Some forget it is there, many others rapidly learn to tolerate it even if they don't like it.
Any issues with fit should be able to be sorted out on the day. One thing about plastic partial dentures, is that it is easy to adapt them if there are any minor fitting issues.
The dentist should make sure you are able to take it out and put it in without issues before you leave.
Swallowing will not be a problem, talking and eating efficiently may take a week or so to master fully.
You brush your teeth as normal, and the dentist will show you how to clean the denture itself.
The grief about losing a front tooth is real and you will work through it.
If you really can't get on with it, then it may well be possible to replace it with a bridge or implant once the gums have fully healed.
I hope you end up being one of the vast, vast majority who adapt well to having to wear a denture.

Lincoln
 
RustyRebecca

RustyRebecca

Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2019
Messages
95
Location
Plymouth
Hi RustyRebecca,
All the many concerns you have listed are valid, and I have seen patients have some of these issues in similar situations over the years.
I would say that the vast majority of patients adapt to a plastic partial denture if they have too. Some forget it is there, many others rapidly learn to tolerate it even if they don't like it.
Any issues with fit should be able to be sorted out on the day. One thing about plastic partial dentures, is that it is easy to adapt them if there are any minor fitting issues.
The dentist should make sure you are able to take it out and put it in without issues before you leave.
Swallowing will not be a problem, talking and eating efficiently may take a week or so to master fully.
You brush your teeth as normal, and the dentist will show you how to clean the denture itself.
The grief about losing a front tooth is real and you will work through it.
If you really can't get on with it, then it may well be possible to replace it with a bridge or implant once the gums have fully healed.
I hope you end up being one of the vast, vast majority who adapt well to having to wear a denture.

Lincoln
Thank you so much for your reply. I really appreciate it.
I have tried contacting my dentist to prepare for the actual procedure but didn't get anywhere. Just the receptionist telling me to take painkillers and eat something before I go on the day. But this is life changing for me. So I am not even sure of the procedure. I am imagining it will be injections, extract front tooth and side tooth (I have a fear of numbing also so I am assuming my top lip will be numb or not spread that far?) and then after that, denture is placed in? And adjusted if need be? I have no idea how big the denture is (they haven't said). I don't know how far back it will go in my mouth. Which worries me. I know it will have to stay in and I think overnight so this will be fun if I panic over it being in my mouth. Hey ho.
I wish dentists could be more aware of anxious/sensitive/traumatised patients. To them, it is routine. To some of us, it is a brand new reality.
 
Gordon

Gordon

Administrator
Staff member
Verified dentist
Joined
Oct 25, 2005
Messages
7,985
Usual process is to take out the teeth, try fitting the denture and then make adjustments as necessary.
The goal is for it to be fairly stable but also that you can remove it yourself easily. If you can keep it in overnight, then great, if you have to remove it then so be it, it won't be the end of the world, if it's only 1 tooth that's being removed then it's not super critical to leave it in overnight.
Can you make a review appointment with the dentist for a few days after the extraction? Immediate dentures nearly always need a bit of adjustment, so the sooner you can get that done the better really. If it's all fine you can always cancel.
 
M

MountainMama

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 1, 2018
Messages
2,537
I only had a temporary partial for six months, but I can relate to the fears of losing your front tooth (or any tooth), and the fear of adjusting to the “after” of the tooth being gone.

When I had my front tooth removed, I also had bone grafting and a bone block put in, and the implant. At the same appointment, the surgeon placed an implant on a lower molar that had been previously removed.

As far as the partial, it does take some adjustments to make it comfortable, at least in my experience. Mine was fitted immediately after the procedure, and the surgeon made a lot of adjustments, but because I was numbed, I couldn’t feel it.
I think I was in the dentist office three times the first week after the extraction getting it adjusted. It probably took five adjustments before it felt comfortable, so don’t be shy about asking them to adjust it if it doesn’t feel right. Mine may have been a little different since it was a temporary one, though.
It is as much an emotional adjustment as well. Let yourself grieve for the lost tooth. A front tooth is a big deal. I couldn’t face looking at myself in the mirror for a few days. Eventually it became my new normal.

The hardest part is taking out the partial for the first time. Once you get past that, it gets easier.

I had a little trouble talking the first day or so, as it felt and sounded different to me, but my husband said it didn’t sound odd at all to him, so it was more in my head.

Brushing is not a problem. You will get used to that quickly. I was told not to brush the first night, just to rinse with a special mouthwash gently.

If you have any other questions I would be happy to answer them about my experience.
 
RustyRebecca

RustyRebecca

Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2019
Messages
95
Location
Plymouth
@MountainMama Hi there. Thank you for answering. I do appreciate it.
I am not a candidate for an implant apparently due to gum disease and bone loss so this partial denture is all that they can offer. And from what I can gather, it isn't a temporary one.
But because it is close to Christmas, I have a feeling I might be left without any support here in the UK for a bit of time. Which obviously isn't good.
I think I am more so worried about panicking about having the denture in my mouth, more than anything. Never feeling okay, if that makes sense? With having something bulky in my mouth.
And I am anxious about the procedure, the numbing especially. How far that numbing spreads, that always triggers anxiety. She is removing the front tooth and I think it is L6 which has not much left to it.
But when exploring their opening hours regarding Christmas, I saw a post written by my dentist and it didn't make me feel all that great. She wrote: 'Anyone who has had dentures will know of the issues they can cause. Dentures are removable and over time the jaw bone and gums where the tooth was lost can deteriorate, meaning the dentures become loose and slip. Eating hard foods with dentures can also lead to alignment issues which can have a detrimental effect on the mouth overall.'
I have got to the point that my anxiety about the appointment and the aftermath is making my brain go numb!
 
Gordon

Gordon

Administrator
Staff member
Verified dentist
Joined
Oct 25, 2005
Messages
7,985
Dentures are removable and over time the jaw bone and gums where the tooth was lost can deteriorate, meaning the dentures become loose and slip.
Yeah, they need replacing about every 5-10 years because of this. The area doesn't "deteriorate" the body takes the bone away to recycle elsewhere, so things change shape a bit. It's not really a big issue. Sounds like somebody is trying to upsell some implants :)

Eating hard foods with dentures can also lead to alignment issues which can have a detrimental effect on the mouth overall.'
Don't understand what they mean by this? Sounds like utter hogwash.
 
M

MountainMama

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 1, 2018
Messages
2,537
@MountainMama Hi there. Thank you for answering. I do appreciate it.
I am not a candidate for an implant apparently due to gum disease and bone loss so this partial denture is all that they can offer. And from what I can gather, it isn't a temporary one.
But because it is close to Christmas, I have a feeling I might be left without any support here in the UK for a bit of time. Which obviously isn't good.
I think I am more so worried about panicking about having the denture in my mouth, more than anything. Never feeling okay, if that makes sense? With having something bulky in my mouth.
And I am anxious about the procedure, the numbing especially. How far that numbing spreads, that always triggers anxiety. She is removing the front tooth and I think it is L6 which has not much left to it.
But when exploring their opening hours regarding Christmas, I saw a post written by my dentist and it didn't make me feel all that great. She wrote: 'Anyone who has had dentures will know of the issues they can cause. Dentures are removable and over time the jaw bone and gums where the tooth was lost can deteriorate, meaning the dentures become loose and slip. Eating hard foods with dentures can also lead to alignment issues which can have a detrimental effect on the mouth overall.'
I have got to the point that my anxiety about the appointment and the aftermath is making my brain go numb!
I completely understand your concern with how it feels in your mouth. I worried about that and I knew mine was temporary. I can imagine your worry.
As far as the procedure and the numbing, my surgeon numbed right around the tooth. It was basically numb right around the tooth and a little up by my nose, but not the rest of my upper mouth. I had the lower quadrant numbed for the other tooth as well.
Can you take anything to help with the anxiety before the appointment? Or get something for the appointment? I know I struggled a lot with fear and had to have a form of light sedation.
 
RustyRebecca

RustyRebecca

Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2019
Messages
95
Location
Plymouth
@MountainMama Thank you. Your response is reassuring. I do have valium for tomorrow but my brain can literally override anything. Just wish it worked in the positive way! :love:
 
M

MountainMama

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 1, 2018
Messages
2,537
@MountainMama Thank you. Your response is reassuring. I do have valium for tomorrow but my brain can literally override anything. Just wish it worked in the positive way! :love:
I am sending lots of positive thoughts your way and I hope it goes well and that the Valium works well.
 
S

Scaredbutready

Member
Joined
May 21, 2021
Messages
91
Location
United states
@RustyRebecca hope you’re doing ok!! That’s a lot to tackle, especially during a holiday where things will be closed. I’ve had extractions and implants and know the fear is real. I hope you’re adjusting and as comfortable as you can be! Hang in there and have them adjust til it’s right for YOU!
 
RustyRebecca

RustyRebecca

Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2019
Messages
95
Location
Plymouth
@Scaredbutready Thank you. It never happened! The dentist rang and said it was bad timing and that if I needed adjustments (which she reckoned I would and could be in pain) then they would be shut till the New Year. I'd psyched myself up for nothing and will have to do the same on January 5th. I have no idea why the appointment was agreed for the 20th. And I took two valium and used them which the doctor won't replace :( Hey ho.
 
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