dental surgery tomorrow! feeling sick

F

fearful1986

Junior member
Joined
Feb 1, 2011
Messages
3
This is my first post on here.

Last week I had my first dentist appointment in about 10 years (I'm 25, from UK).

Finally worked up the courage to see a dentist as I have 2 decayed teeth (1 massively so and hurts terribly)

I was shaking in the waiting room. I went in, and basically freaked out. To cut a long story short, I got into the chair, and started sweating when it was lowered - and also got the un-nerving feeling I was going to fall off.

Basically, I got a lecture about brushing, and with the two decayed teeth, 1 of them he recommended I have extracted, and the other I was given the option of a root canal and crown, or extraction.

I've gone with having both extracted, as I've heard horror stories from even non-phobic patients how painful root canals are, and don't think I could handle it and would rather sacrifice the tooth.

Both teeth that need work are molars so won't affect what most people see!

My main fear now is after the lecture last week about brushing, and also when I mentioned I had a fear of dental work he didn't even acknowledge this, is that the surgery tomorrow will be more distressing than it needs to be, and that this will compound my fear and put me off from seeing a dentist about future work that may be needed.

I'm with an NHS dentist, and can't afford private work, but are there any fellow uk-based friends on here who have had a similar experience, and has anyone experienced phobic-friendly NHS dentists?
 
F

flippedout

Junior member
Joined
Feb 1, 2011
Messages
3
I took 1.5 Halcion pills before my gum surgery. Injections were a little painfull at the start of my gum surgery but I don't remember anything else! Was a snap to get all of the "terrible" work done.
 
D

drummerswife

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 30, 2009
Messages
1,246
hi Flippedout,
I dont live in the UK but reading your post I am really concerned by the way the dentist treated you. Scolding, lecturing, and not acknowedging your feears of dental work seems really insensitive to me. And it does nothing to help you deal with your fear but rather, as you say, it only makes things worse. I am wondering if you have perhaps considered getting a second opinion from another dentist who might be more caring? I know you said you cannot afford private care but my thought is there surely must be someone ekse who would be more sensitive to your needs.
 
brit

brit

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Mar 23, 2006
Messages
6,865
This is my first post on here.

Last week I had my first dentist appointment in about 10 years (I'm 25, from UK).

Finally worked up the courage to see a dentist as I have 2 decayed teeth (1 massively so and hurts terribly)

I was shaking in the waiting room. I went in, and basically freaked out. To cut a long story short, I got into the chair, and started sweating when it was lowered - and also got the un-nerving feeling I was going to fall off.

Basically, I got a lecture about brushing, and with the two decayed teeth, 1 of them he recommended I have extracted, and the other I was given the option of a root canal and crown, or extraction.

I've gone with having both extracted, as I've heard horror stories from even non-phobic patients how painful root canals are, and don't think I could handle it and would rather sacrifice the tooth.

Both teeth that need work are molars so won't affect what most people see!

My main fear now is after the lecture last week about brushing, and also when I mentioned I had a fear of dental work he didn't even acknowledge this, is that the surgery tomorrow will be more distressing than it needs to be, and that this will compound my fear and put me off from seeing a dentist about future work that may be needed.

I'm with an NHS dentist, and can't afford private work, but are there any fellow uk-based friends on here who have had a similar experience, and has anyone experienced phobic-friendly NHS dentists?

Hi :welcome:
I'd think very carefully about kissing goodbye to a molar which can be saved.
You are only 25 and you need your molars to chew your food until you die...especially if they are both on the same side of your mouth.

Not trying to be alarmist but if your only reason for opting for extraction is the horror stories you have read about root canals, then this is faulty reasoning based on an incorrect assumption that root canals are painful - since along with all dentistry it can be painfree without sedation. Why not ask the dentist what you can expect? Nothing like hearing it will be comfortable from the person doing the work.
However a rushed NHS molar root canal may not be the best option for your poorly tooth - molar teeth are technically difficult because they have more than one canal inside them and endodontists (private root canal specialists) have a much better success rate with them.

My advice would be to do just one extraction at the appt tomorrow and based on how you find it, have a rethink. Don't be rushed into anything just because it's NHS.
If you are in gainful employment, then you can afford a private root canal (since you can borrow to pay for it) at your very young age it would be a shame to lose such an important tooth unnecessarily.

If you like the dentist, and financially you have no choice, you could let him try an rct on NHS - it could buy you a few years before it blows again (because of missed canals) when you might be financially in a better position than you are now. Obviously if you try this and he gives you a hard time, you can opt to extract instead but at least you would have tried the more appropriate option and not dismissed it out of hand.
Good luck with the appt tomorrow...remember you have a right to comfortable care, if they can't get you numb, you go elsewhere.:grouphug:
 
F

fearful1986

Junior member
Joined
Feb 1, 2011
Messages
3
Well, just got back from the appointment. To my relief, the dentist was much more compassionate this time round, and even apologised for last week. I'm prepared to give him the benefit of the doubt, and continue treatment with him.

The problem today was that I couldn't get numb! Initially, after several lots of injections he tried to do a filling, but after about 2 seconds of drilling I felt incredible pain. He stopped, gave me more anaesthetic, and after waiting a few minutes, tried again, and the same thing happened. :scared:

He then took an x-ray, and discovered the nerve is infected, therefore making the anaesthetic ineffective. We decided to extract the tooth, but even that was too painful to complete. :o

He prescribed me some anti-biotics, and have an appointment to try again next week.

Has this happened to anyone else on here? If, even after anti-biotic treatment I can't get numb enough for treatment, are there any alternatives to get the problem treated relatively pain free?

This was obviously a pretty distressing attempt at treatment, but I'm at least feeling more comfortable with the dentist himself.
 
brit

brit

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Mar 23, 2006
Messages
6,865
Were you given a different antibiotic this time...sometimes you have the more stubborn bugs. It is often possible to numb infected teeth sufficiently to work on them (Gordon always claims he can!) it's a shame you were put through so much before calling a halt.
Is this just the worst of the two teeth you were trying to extract?
Glad he was nicer but you really didn't have a positive experience so you are being very brave :jump:

More info on numbing problems here:


Different antibiotic may be required, maybe too much time elapsed between appts and the infection came back? Best wishes.
If he can't get you numb enough, you can ask to be seen at the hospital and they can do i/v sedation or GA or better injection technique.
If he's a young inexperienced dentist it is possible that a more senior dentist at the practice would be able to get you numb - this happened to someone else on here...the senior lady came to the rescue with an effectively placed shot.
 
B

ButterfliesInHerEyes

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 4, 2010
Messages
153
YAY! :jump: You did it! You got through the appointment! See? You CAN do it.

My dad had the same problem for the same reason - the dentist said it might also have been because my dad was terrified. I don't know if fear can cause the freezing to not work, but that's what she (the dentist) said.
 
brit

brit

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Mar 23, 2006
Messages
6,865
YAY! :jump: You did it! You got through the appointment! See? You CAN do it.

My dad had the same problem for the same reason - the dentist said it might also have been because my dad was terrified. I don't know if fear can cause the freezing to not work, but that's what she (the dentist) said.

Yes it is on the list in the 'Can't get numb' link as well. Obviously though continuing to work regardless is a particularly inappropriate response if anxiety is at the bottom of it.
 
Top