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Dentist white coat

J

jim lg

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Aug 19, 2009
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I'm going to a new dentist in a few days. On the forms they asked me to fill out before hand, on question was "Is there anything else about having dental treatment that you'd like us to know" Would asking that the doctor not wear a white coat be an appropriate request?
 
BoxerMom

BoxerMom

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Can’t hurt to ask. The dentist I’m seeing doesn’t ever wear a coat. He and his entire clinical staff wear matching scrubs. I’m assuming the coat is an issue for you, so you should be upfront with them.
 
J

jim lg

Junior member
Joined
Aug 19, 2009
Messages
10
Can’t hurt to ask. The dentist I’m seeing doesn’t ever wear a coat. He and his entire clinical staff wear matching scrubs. I’m assuming the coat is an issue for you, so you should be upfront with them.
The white coat is a bit of an issue for me. It is kind of an authority thing, don't you think?

I prefer the dentist to sit in front of me while speaking to me for the first time at a visit. For a few appointments I went to group practice where I never saw the same doctor or hygienist twice. Sometimes they'd enter the room and sit on their stool behind me and almost immediately recline the chair without even introducing themselves. So now I sit on the chair with my feet on the ground until we get to know one another. Works pretty well, and sends the signal that I'm submitting to treatment when I'm ready, not on their schedule.
 
BoxerMom

BoxerMom

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Yeah I get that. I also sit like that until I’m ready. My dentist always comes in and shakes my hand while asking how I’ve been, and he will sit on a stool facing me while we talk. It helps so much but they were fully informed of my phobia before I stepped through the door. They always seem to make an effort to make me feel more comfortable. So yes, you should definitely let them know your concerns beforehand. If you don’t feel comfortable or they don’t listen to you, speak up and let them know.
 
J

jim lg

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Aug 19, 2009
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10
What's your thinking about a stiff drink before an appointment?
 
Enarete

Enarete

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Would asking that the doctor not wear a white coat be an appropriate request?
I think it is ok and surely reasonable to have issues with white coats, however it might be a bit nicer just to let them know that this is a huge issue for you and makes you feel uncomfortable or that you are having much easier time coping with an appointment if the doctor does not wear a white coat. Or maybe there is anything else that would help you tolerate even a white coat, such as having a good chat at the beginning etc.? Anyway, hope they will be wearing colorful tunikas.

Alcohol is not a good idea. It can interfere with a treatment and even if it's just an exam, it will interfere with a valid consent and could be a reason for the dentist to send you home. If you feel you need some help to get yourself to the appointment, the best is to let your practice know and see what options they can give you.
 
Judythecat

Judythecat

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Mar 7, 2018
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The dentists at my surgery all wear scrubs, so do the nurses. I think that they have to (here in the UK) for infection control/hygiene reasons, plus have their arms bare to the elbow.

FWIW, I think any good dentist will have a chat with you rather than get you tipped straight back in the chair. Mine tends to lean against the wall while I perch on the chair, then after a chat she asks if she can tilt it, and I swing my legs round. I’m not a particularly nervous patient, but when I had to be referred to a specialist for root canal I was really apprehensive about seeing someone new. He had me sit in a fancy armchair while we spoke initially! (I should have had a throne for his prices, really - but he was great.)
 
J

jim lg

Junior member
Joined
Aug 19, 2009
Messages
10
I think it is ok and surely reasonable to have issues with white coats, however it might be a bit nicer just to let them know that this is a huge issue for you and makes you feel uncomfortable or that you are having much easier time coping with an appointment if the doctor does not wear a white coat. Or maybe there is anything else that would help you tolerate even a white coat, such as having a good chat at the beginning etc.? Anyway, hope they will be wearing colorful tunikas.

Alcohol is not a good idea. It can interfere with a treatment and even if it's just an exam, it will interfere with a valid consent and could be a reason for the dentist to send you home. If you feel you need some help to get yourself to the appointment, the best is to let your practice know and see what options they can give you.
I wouldn't attend stumbling drunk that I couldn't drive home, but points well taken. I'd hate to suffer the angst of awaiting an appointment, get seated and all and THEN be told it was all for naught because I had three too many cocktails...
 
S

Surreyvwphobic

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Oct 1, 2010
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214
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In dental heaven
I am amazed any dentists still wear white coats these days! Increasingly in the UK, most dentists seem to wear tunics of varying colours (black or dark blue the most common), and the experiences I have had over the last couple of years is that most tunics I have seen look very much like one would see at a hairdressers or spa (massage therapists etc). My current dentist and her nurse wear a neat little black number which totally removes any past memories of awful coats and grey chairs....... Another good reason to research and meet before proceeding......
 
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