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Dentures: stupid question - how do you know which are the top and bottom?

D

Dawn65

Well-known member
Joined
May 26, 2019
Messages
126
Location
Warwickshire
I know this sounds really, really stupid, but how do you tell top dentures from bottom dentures and, apparently 'which way round they are supposed to go'.

I have new plates and they are proving a real trauma...I thought we'd have to try them again tonight to be able to explain to the dentist better how and why they don't feel right.

I find them disgusting, so I blind folded myself and asked my husband to put them in for me.

But he really couldn't work out which were the top ones and which were the bottom ones. I think, he got it in the end but then said: "I can't even work out which way round they are supposed to go". I have zero idea what he meant by that - is it possible to get them up side down?

They definately had to come straight out of my mouth again and felt very, Very wrong - but in a different way sort of wrong from when the dentist did it. It felt like the bottom ones had that nasty pink ridge suspended half way up the back of my front teeth.

The nasty pink ridge on the top was NOWHERE near my front teeth. It was suspended across the roof of my mouth with a ginormous space between the roof of my mouth and the plastic.

I am right in thinking that the nasty pink plastic is supposed to go behind your top front teeth not across the soft plate of your mouth, aren't I?

So, whatever he did there it wasn't right, was it?

Can some one offer a response I can show him. I'll attach picture.

Believe me I felt sick taking it. But now that I have looked, they look monstrously thick. Shouldn't they be waffer thinner. No wonder, I feel like there's no where for my tongue.20190702_193439.jpg
 
You have partial dentures
The bottom one is for the top
I can't help much as this particularly style I haven't done.
 
Is there more than one style???? What do you mean by style, exactly?

What others are there?

Do these look too thick to be tolerated to you?
 
There are several types with the main difference being more stable and thinner. I think this is best answered by a dentist who works in England as the NHS is different than what I deal with here in the states.
 
There are several types with the main difference being more stable and thinner. I think this is best answered by a dentist who works in England as the NHS is different than what I deal with here in the states.

Thank you. If any one out there can help?

Kind of got what I'm given at the moment and there is very little prospect these are ever going to work. I don't mind paying for something that does, but have to find a solution available in the UK fast.

The gaps in my teeth are making me very ill and I've got no hope of getting better until I've got something I can tolerate in my mouth and then get over the psychological hurdles of handling them.

Options, anyone please?
 
Okay if you are able to spend money to have comfort and function then you have options based on how I see your partials.
It looks like you have teeth in front and behind the missing teeth. Is that right?
Options include the following pending proper examination first.
1. implants and crowns
2. bridges where the teeth on each side get crowns. Glued in place feels just like teeth.
3. Partials with a thin metal framework and proper retentive elements so they don't move.
 
Thank you.

Well, implants and crowns are definately OUT because there is no way in Hell I could ever go through it.

So, it's denture options I we need to work with. Is metal the only thing that can make them thinner, or are there other materials?
 
metal is best when done well.
 
Dawn,

I have had partial w metal for many years and really had no problem w the gagging they feel pretty secure as dentures can. about 10 years back I lost 2 more teeth and though I told the dentist I want the one with metal he tried to give me the flexible denture like these. I could not stand it right away. I also couldn't have them in my mouth they were tight and gaggy and bulky. I cried for days.. then I got on a forum for young dentists and kind dentist told me to go and ask for the metal one since that is what I asked for and I should be happy and be able to function for sure. Well I did go back and the dentist was more than happy to change it for me, it was a little more money not too much. but to him he was just saving me money and thought these might work.. (though he didn't listen to me).. but because of the advice I felt validated and I'm really glad I went back. The partial with metal to Me is ALOT better , it is thinner and more secure.. and I know some people may do well wtih flexible and like them but I can totally validate they are NOT for everyone..
 
Flexible ones have their place but I seldom use them.
 
Dr Kimsey,

The dentist that tried my flexible ones said he did so for aesthetic reasons , is this a common reason.? I know I'm the only one who can tell I have the metal clasps and they sure help alot.. what are reasons besides this someone would choose the flexible ones ? I imagine cost?
 
There's not much in it cost wise, the flexible ones are pretty expensive, due to lack of competition in the market place, there are only a couple of manufacturers who make them.
Having said that, if I had to wear partial dentures I'd want the metal ones.

Back to the OP, how long is is since you've had extractions done? The NHS won't allow metal framed dentures within 4 months of an extraction.
 
You have partial dentures
The bottom one is for the top
I can't help much as this particularly style I haven't done.

Thank you, my husband tried it again today and managed to get them the right way round. I managed to tolerate the bottom one for a minute. Long enough to identify the the bottom plate wiggles and that there is a massive gap behind it.

With respect to the top one, it was only a matter of seconds before he had to remove them. But, unless he isn't putting it in right still, the plate was NOWHERE NEAR the my front teeth and was definately strung over the roof of my mouth in the middle of my mouth, just about that spot where anyone would gag.

Can one of you dentists confirm for me whether or not I am correct in thinking that denture plates are not supposed to do this?
 
metal is best when done well.

I'm not closing my mind to any denture option but are there thin materials other than metal?

Does the metal touch your teeth at all? Can you feel the metal bit in the mouth?

Just trying to ensure, I've identified ALL the options..
 
There's not much in it cost wise, the flexible ones are pretty expensive, due to lack of competition in the market place, there are only a couple of manufacturers who make them.
Having said that, if I had to wear partial dentures I'd want the metal ones.

Back to the OP, how long is is since you've had extractions done? The NHS won't allow metal framed dentures within 4 months of an extraction.


Hi Gordon, thanks for coming back. In answer 3 months now. Does the NHS do metal, then?

I haven't had any discussion on options really with the dentist, other than do we do them or not. I assumed initially that that meant there was only one sort of denture.

Are you able to tell me where the plate is supposed to be in your mouth?
 
Dr Kimsey,

The dentist that tried my flexible ones said he did so for aesthetic reasons , is this a common reason.? I know I'm the only one who can tell I have the metal clasps and they sure help alot.. what are reasons besides this someone would choose the flexible ones ? I imagine cost?

Hiya, thanks I don't care about what people see. I'm worried about having metal in my mouth though, or anything metal clasping my teeth.

By flexible here I understand the plastic things that have no plate and just slide in, not plastic plates. Some one here showed me hers. I'd had no idea they existed, either.

My special care dentist did find a company that produce those and the coloured plates that we've talked about here before. I wrote to them but they won't deal direct with patients, so won't even answer my questions.

The constant denture dealings is consuming me 24/7 just now, exhausting me and making my MH issues in relation to them worse by the day.

I have to get a plan of action sorted here so I know where to go and what to insist on while I've still got the rational mental capacity to do it.
 
Any one from the UK got any clue what these things cost btw?
 
Fees vary a great deal. It should vary based on quality of metal alloy used(little), quality of teeth(more) and greatest difference based on the dentist and the lab labor.
Explanation:
I design partials the same as I was taught. I take an impression and examine with a tool how the partial may best go in and out. This same tool will help men design where I need to prepare the teeth to best work. I next take an accurate impression. I send it to the lab along with my design. If the lab has questions or input we will talk. The lab then makes the metal casting and may also set the desired teeth in a wax matrix. I then see the patient and try that in to make sure it fits and looks fine. The next step is the lab will process the partial. I see the patient again and fit the partial. I make sure the bite is even, it is retentive, and I evaluate and remove excess pressure spots via a technique I use. The patient takes it home and returns for adjustments as part of the total fee.
 
Fees vary a great deal. It should vary based on quality of metal alloy used(little), quality of teeth(more) and greatest difference based on the dentist and the lab labor.
Explanation:
I design partials the same as I was taught. I take an impression and examine with a tool how the partial may best go in and out. This same tool will help men design where I need to prepare the teeth to best work. I next take an accurate impression. I send it to the lab along with my design. If the lab has questions or input we will talk. The lab then makes the metal casting and may also set the desired teeth in a wax matrix. I then see the patient and try that in to make sure it fits and looks fine. The next step is the lab will process the partial. I see the patient again and fit the partial. I make sure the bite is even, it is retentive, and I evaluate and remove excess pressure spots via a technique I use. The patient takes it home and returns for adjustments as part of the total fee.

Are we talking, hundreds, thousands or tens of thousands sterling

Just trying to gauge whether this the sort of ready cash I'm likely to have or am going to have to look at other means of paying? Cheers.
 
I have a semi-flexible partial denture, it is two teeth (lower molar and pre-molar) and no plate. It clips round the next door teeth with gum coloured bits. It cost £300, and was not available on the NHS. Attached is a photo I took just now, baring my teeth so you can see.
 

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