• Welcome! This is a forum for anyone who is affected by a fear of the dentist, dental phobia, or specific dental fears.

    We are lucky to count a number of dentists among our members and moderators. Look out for the "Verified dentist" badges. If you are a dental professional who likes to help, please join our community!

    Register now to access many more features and forums!

Does a child having multiple fillings require general anesthetic?

J

Jo L

Junior member
Joined
Oct 10, 2020
Messages
3
Location
London
When I was 8 or 9 in the 1970’s I apparently needed multiple fillings (Not in any pain - just having a check up) in one visit to a dentist I had never met before. He gave me a general anesthetic and three or four fillings (no extractions). I am wondering if a dentist on here from those days can tell me if this procedure sounds right?
Also, I am now in my 50’s and having a crown fitted. I had a local anesthetic for the mould taking stage and during this procedure I began to find my breathing was sporadic, anxious, involuntarily held at times and my body started to shake also. I think I had a panic attack. Would my experience in the here and now be linked to the dental experience of the past and is there anything I can do to reduce my anxiety around this?
 
Enarete

Enarete

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Sep 18, 2017
Messages
2,841
Hi Jo L,

not a dentist and can‘t tell you whether the procedure was right, but I could imagine that sedation for children was common back then. Can you remember having difficulties with the dentist as a child?
Your experience with mould taking sounds scary. Your question about it is a complex one and most likely only you can tell whether there is a link to the past. Are you able to point out what made you anxious as you were sitting there?
When it comes to reducing anxiety, this is all about finding out what things make it difficult for you at the dentist and what could help and having a kind caring dentist who can help you with it. How were your visits in the past - did you have anxiety? And were you coping until now?

All the best wishes
 
T

Thephilsblogbar

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 23, 2015
Messages
730
Location
United Kingdom
I remember when I was 8 or 9 I needed some baby teeth removing to ensure my adult teeth were coming through. I was put to sleep at the dental hospital. this was done in the late 90s
 
J

Jo L

Junior member
Joined
Oct 10, 2020
Messages
3
Location
London
Hi Jo L,

not a dentist and can‘t tell you whether the procedure was right, but I could imagine that sedation for children was common back then. Can you remember having difficulties with the dentist as a child?
Your experience with mould taking sounds scary. Your question about it is a complex one and most likely only you can tell whether there is a link to the past. Are you able to point out what made you anxious as you were sitting there?
When it comes to reducing anxiety, this is all about finding out what things make it difficult for you at the dentist and what could help and having a kind caring dentist who can help you with it. How were your visits in the past - did you have anxiety? And were you coping until now?

All the best wishes
Thank you Enraret for your reply. I think the dentist visits as a child were always nerve wracking. Having someone in my personal space and the drill / tools in my mouth. As an adult I have , up until the crown mould experience this week, managed my anxiety by finding a dentist I like, I trust, and is kind and this has for many years been a lady doctor dentist. Even with her I am still a little anxious, hands clasped tightly but no shaking when I have had a filling. The scary experience last week was with a male dentist I had not met before. He stood in for my dentist as she is not working due to COVID. I don’t know what started my shaking off. I didn’t have any conscious thoughts which I could say triggered it. I think maybe the strong local anaesthetics played a role in physiological response along with what may have been an adrenaline release due to an ‘Unknown’ person treating me possibly. I realised he wasn’t very ‘trauma aware’ when I told him while in the chair, I was struggling to breathe and was very nervous (and clearly shaking) he just said ‘ breathe through your mouth or your nose - whichever you prefer’ and carried on. He was proficient in what he was doing and there were no slip ups with the treatment he gave by the way.

I don’t know what I can hope for in this event. I needed treatment and it was going to be done by a stranger. Maybe I need to find a dentist who works well with / has had training in working with anxious patients.
 
krlovesherkids777

krlovesherkids777

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 26, 2017
Messages
2,926
Location
Minneapolis, MN
Jo L

Hello, Your post sounds a bit familiar . I have had the sedation as a kid then moved to a horrible dentist. fast forward, lots of dental issues.

The local experience with the adrenalene can make you fell this way and give that kind of response. its happened to me on several occasions and its very scarier.. honestly its scarier if you are with a dentist who is not as trauma aware or empathetic.. or anxious friendly. and they sort of gloss over your anxieites and experiences.. it just doesn't do much for relaxation.. and really increases anxiety.

I hope your old dentist you work well with can come back before you need here again and you can get treatment from her again or another more anxious friendly dentist. Hope your fillings are doing well!
 
T

Thephilsblogbar

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 23, 2015
Messages
730
Location
United Kingdom
I had the remaining baby teeth removed the year after at another dental hospital but was not put under. I don't think I was a difficult patient when I was a child.

I probably needed being put under the first time, to help ensure my adult teeth would come through properly, as my childhood dentist could not do the job.
 
J

Jo L

Junior member
Joined
Oct 10, 2020
Messages
3
Location
London
Jo L

Hello, Your post sounds a bit familiar . I have had the sedation as a kid then moved to a horrible dentist. fast forward, lots of dental issues.

The local experience with the adrenalene can make you fell this way and give that kind of response. its happened to me on several occasions and its very scarier.. honestly its scarier if you are with a dentist who is not as trauma aware or empathetic.. or anxious friendly. and they sort of gloss over your anxieites and experiences.. it just doesn't do much for relaxation.. and really increases anxiety.

I hope your old dentist you work well with can come back before you need here again and you can get treatment from her again or another more anxious friendly dentist. Hope your fillings are doing well!
Thank you. Your reply is really helpful. I think it is about the management of trauma and anxiety. My fillings are doing well😊. I am making a contingency plan I case my regular dentist doesn’t come back. I am looking into local anxiety friendly dentists.
 
Enarete

Enarete

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Sep 18, 2017
Messages
2,841
Hi there,

I can see how having a new dentist who you're not familiar with can make things difficult. Also, this is about control and it is important to have the confidence that your dentist will stop if your discomfort reaches a certain level, instead of just going on. Impressions is a difficult part for many patients so I would expect a brief chat about whether you had it in the past and had difficulties and also some strategy in case you get uncomfortable. A bit of communication can help a lot here, instead of just doing it and those dentists do not have to have shield "for nervous patients" on their door, they just need to be a kind person.
Another thing needed is for you to know what triggers your anxiety and what helps. So last time you learned that having a new dentist who is not particularly kind is something that makes things difficult. That's an important thing to realize too.

Hope you find a nice dentist soon. Btw., we have a recommendation section if you seek inspiration. For London we can particularly recommend out Christopher Brown who we met on the conference about nervous patients some time ago or, if you don't mind traveling to Welwyn Garden city, Lincoln Hirst. Lincoln has been on this forum many many years and he is brilliant.

All the best wishes
:grouphug:
 
Top