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Extraction and Implant with a Cadaver/Donor Bone Graft

U

ukw

Junior member
Joined
Feb 28, 2018
Messages
6
I'm scheduled to undergo extraction of a molar tooth with a cadaver bone graft to prepare for a future implant. Believe it or not I haven't been able to find a lot of resources on this. Do a lot of people do this? There's plenty of info about cavities, crowns, root canals, but on this topic I've only been able to find 15-20 sites. Why is that? Is it because this is a new procedure, or because cadaver bone grafts are only used in the US? I live in the US. Do people in other countries not get bone grafts at all with an extraction, or non-donor ones?

Secondly, the surgeon didn't mention to me the option of synthetic bone grafts. I only found out about them online. Aren't there immune risks from donor cadaver bone grafts? I know they've been disinfected, but this is like blood transfusion. If your body tends to reject foreign DNA by raising your white blood cells or having an immunological response, you could be at risk for something. Very surprised that a simple extraction of a tooth could have such far-reaching consequences -- and there's very little info about it. Some people online have reported getting hives, acne, fever; others have had mysterious diseases or cancers a few years on. I realize it's mostly safe and the surgeon said implants are 99% successful, but why is there so little data on this? And why not insist on synthetic materials to avoid an immune reaction? The bone should grow in regardless.

In summary I'm a little confused by how this doesn't seem like a common procedure, I'm sure lots of people get teeth extracted but maybe not in this way.
 
DrTeeth

DrTeeth

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Mar 1, 2018
Messages
20
Hi,

These are all questions that you should be asking your treating surgeon. He is the most qualified to answer them. If you do not feel comfortable asking him, he is not the right surgeon for you.

I have had cadaverous bone placed in my spine recently, and I had enough faith in my surgeon to let him get on with it rather than to question him.

Good Luck,

DrTeeth
 
U

ukw

Junior member
Joined
Feb 28, 2018
Messages
6
But let me ask you: extractions of adult teeth are a fairly common procedure, I'm sure lots of people have had them, and yet discussions of bone grafts are almost non-existent. Why is that? Is it not common for extractions to be accompanied by bone grafts?
 
DrTeeth

DrTeeth

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Mar 1, 2018
Messages
20
Hi ukw,

"Bone grafts" are not at all common after an extraction. I put those two words in "s because "bone graft" is a general term that covers several different procedures.

The main reason that they are considered is to make as sure as possible that there will be enough bone (height and width) in place to take an implant. These techniques do not have to be done at the time of the extraction.

Cheers

DrTeeth
 
U

ukw

Junior member
Joined
Feb 28, 2018
Messages
6
So if I understand correctly from this quote,

"Bone grafts" are not at all common after an extraction.
Most people don't care about shrinking bone and rotating teeth (which inevitably follows any extraction of non-wisdom teeth)? And no one reminds them about it? They extract teeth with no implant to take its place and no plan to save the jawbone from retraction?
 
A

assertives

Member
Joined
Dec 20, 2017
Messages
76
So if I understand correctly from this quote,



Most people don't care about shrinking bone and rotating teeth (which inevitably follows any extraction of non-wisdom teeth)? And no one reminds them about it? They extract teeth with no implant to take its place and no plan to save the jawbone from retraction?

Can't say for sure if it's because they don't care about the shrinking bone. There are other factors such as cost, and also if they actually can afford or even want to get an implant, because there are other cheaper alternatives to replace missing teeth such as a bridge.

A bone graft is usually done if one is getting an implant and does not have enough bone to support the implant. So it is not exactly a routine recommended treatment for bone grafts after every extraction.

I'm sure dentists remind patients to do something about it after extracting a tooth to preserve the jawbone, but ultimately, it is the patient's own choice whether to they want to follow through with it or not.
 
DrTeeth

DrTeeth

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Joined
Mar 1, 2018
Messages
20
It is really not that necessary at all to plan very for ahead for an implant. Any bone augmentation is not available on the NHS, apart from a few rare cases, and would cost several hundred pounds.

There is nothing to be gained doing something sooner as any augmentation can be done at the time an implant is considered.

If an implant is considered, the extraction is postponed where possible so that bone augmentation is NOT required.

DrTeeth
 
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