Extreme Fear Of Injections! Need Filling! Help!

T

Traumatized

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:cry: I need URGENT help... You might be thinking ''It's only a filling, calm down'' but I have an EXTREME fear of injections...
In the past, I never used to brush my teeth, well, at least not alot. I didn't have a dentist either. But when I was about... 6 I had an excruciatingly painful toothache, all day, every day in one of my teeth. So I signed up for a dentist and he said I needed it filled. I was OK with that because I didn't know he was going to give me an injection. One the procedure was over it didn't hurt, but wasn't comfortable either. None of my other teeth hurt but he said I needed another anyway. The second time I was in tears with pain, then I needed a third, then a fourth, but before I could have the fourth done I changed dentists because I hated him SO much. My new dentist is much nicer and said I didn't need a filling but monitored that tooth. But this morning (16th of Feburary) he said there was a small hole WHICH NEEDED FILLING. I immediatly burst in to tears and he kept telling me he'd get a girl nurse to do it if it made me feel better, that he'd be gentle and lots of things. But he didn't realise that ITS NOT THE TREATMENT I'M AFRAID OF, ITS THE INJECTION. I've been in tears for the past few hours so I decided to sign up here and get advice. I really don't want any needle of any sort. I don't know whether they do that Laughing Gas, but I'll ask. What else is a possibility? Also, saying it won't hurt isn't going to make much of a difference since as I have experienced the pain before. However, I'm much older now, and he's a new dentist, so I don't know if it will hurt. He says he'll put bubblegum numbing gel on but... I don't know. I have to go for the filling around the 20th OF MARCH

Sorry this post is so long :D If you just need the important stuff, read the purple bits. If you need to know about my past, look at the blue.
Please, I'm REALLY scared :cry::cry::cry:

EDIT/UPDATE: My dentist doesn't give Laughing Gas to under 16, and he doesn't have The Wand either :cry: I'm still a little scared, but I think I'll be OK. Does anybody have any relaxation techniques? Or ways to keep me calm? I would really appreciate it :grouphug:


Traumatized (A.K.A - Holly)
 
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F

fionaa

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I know how you feel, the last time i saw my dentist (which i think it was about 2 years ago now) was when i needed a filling. a few weeks before i watched my brother have his filling. which made me aare what was going to happen. once i arrive i sat in the chair and my dentist told me she was going to put on 'magic gel' that would numb it, i freaked as i knew what was going to come this huge suringe. i started crying :cry: tottaly lost it and havent seen my dentist since.
sorry havent been much help just wanted to know your not alone :) x:hidesbehindsofa:
 
D

Deb89

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352
I had never had any sort of injection in my mouth until I went for a root canal last year. I did have laughing gas and they didn't inject my gum with novacaine until I was feeling pleasantly buzzed from the laughing gas (definitely see if they have it there, it REALLY relaxes you). I also found closing my eyes helped a lot, as then I couldn't see it coming towards my mouth (I'm sure I would have been jumpy had I). Also as I've seen before on here it's all about the dentist's technique. Have you told him you're scared of injections? I'm sure it'd help a lot and then you can maybe set up a signal if it's starting to hurt and you want him to go slower. Maybe raising your hand or something. There's also something called the wand, don't know much about it but you can find more information about it on top. You could also ask for some numbing gel on the area first, that way you won't feel the injection as much.

Hope I helped! :hug2:
 
T

Traumatized

Guest
I know how you feel, the last time i saw my dentist (which i think it was about 2 years ago now) was when i needed a filling. a few weeks before i watched my brother have his filling. which made me aare what was going to happen. once i arrive i sat in the chair and my dentist told me she was going to put on 'magic gel' that would numb it, i freaked as i knew what was going to come this huge suringe. i started crying :cry: tottaly lost it and havent seen my dentist since.
sorry havent been much help just wanted to know your not alone :) x:hidesbehindsofa:

Oh My Goodness :o What dentist do you go to because thats EXACTLY what my dentist called it the 'Magic Gel'
 
T

Traumatized

Guest
I had never had any sort of injection in my mouth until I went for a root canal last year. I did have laughing gas and they didn't inject my gum with novacaine until I was feeling pleasantly buzzed from the laughing gas (definitely see if they have it there, it REALLY relaxes you). I also found closing my eyes helped a lot, as then I couldn't see it coming towards my mouth (I'm sure I would have been jumpy had I). Also as I've seen before on here it's all about the dentist's technique. Have you told him you're scared of injections? I'm sure it'd help a lot and then you can maybe set up a signal if it's starting to hurt and you want him to go slower. Maybe raising your hand or something. There's also something called the wand, don't know much about it but you can find more information about it on top. You could also ask for some numbing gel on the area first, that way you won't feel the injection as much.

Hope I helped! :hug2:

Thanks you've actually calmed me down now ;)
But the thing is, I get scared closing my eyes because I don't know when he's going to start! Then if he starts when I don't expect it I'll jump and get all scared again!! But thanks for the info on the laughing gas, I might ring him up and ask if he has it! :p
 
D

Deb89

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Everyone has their own techniques. I always knew when she was going to because she'd lift up my lip. Maybe you can bring a little squishy ball and squeeze it to distract yourself from the shot? I've gotten so many injections now I'm used to them. Just think of it as helping you feel no discomfort at all, that's what I did when I got the root canal. (And that was my first visit after not going for several years!)
 
G

GrahamDee

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Jan 11, 2009
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The worst bit for me in routine dental work is the injection and although I can tolerate it myself, I can understand why people have problems with it.

My current dentist doesn't use the numbing gel (I wish she would sometimes!), but I have had it occasionally. And maybe your priority would be to find an understanding dentist who does and insist on having it. If he doesn't, then get up and walk out. Simple as that.

With gel, all you feel is the cold gel on your gums which has a bubblegum flavour (I have had orange occasionally), wait two mins and the very next sensation is your mouth going numb. No pricks or scratches or anything. Its the best thing ever and you will wonder what all the fuss is about. I am surprised its not common practice to use it.
 
S

Stress Doc

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Hello:

Needle phobia is very common. Many famous people have it even people you would not expect like Jackie Chan the martial arts star.

Much of needle phobia has to do with the anticipatory anxiety of the event. This causes hypersensitivity and increased apparent pain response.

In addition to simple behavioral therapy (relaxation, PMR, glove anesthesia techniques) there a few things that can be done.

1. If a benzocaine gel is used it need to be left on for 1-2 minutes for maximum affect. The gel is 20% benzocaine is is very powerful but it takes a couple of minutes to be effective. Some dentists use a device called the wand. This does totally painless injections. If the injection is done slowly enough there is no pain. The pain comes from the lidocaine/enephinerine that causes a slight burning or stinging if it is injected to fast.

2. Closing your eyes can increase sensitivity ( I know there is an ongoing debate on this and the sensitivity response is not universal.

3. Anti-anxiety medications like ativan slow the central nervous system response and decrease sensitivity. Laughing gas can do the same thing. You dentist can prescribe you an anti-anxiety medication to take 30-40 minutes before the appointment. I reccommend Ativan 1mg. This kicks in after about 30 minutes and works very well. We use it with our anxiety patients to calm them down so we start relaxation techniques.

4. Overloading one of the five senses can provide distraction. The auditory sense works best. This can be done by listening to white noise (ocean waves) at a reasonable volume. It not only induces relaxation but the sensory overload drops the pain response.

I have used hypnosis quite effectively with needle phobics. In the family practice clinic where I work we do joint injections and the hypnosis help. I can get you an audio file of the technique I use.

There are many things that can be done to make this easier. Most of the problem comes from the fear and hypersensitive pain response. There can also be a phantom-pain response which causes pain from the belief of pain due to a past pain.

I am not saying you have not experienced pain in the past, I believe you have. The anxiety makes the situation worse. If the anxiety is calmed the pain response drops with it. This is one reason I like relaxation/hypnosis techniques. if combined with anti-anxiety medications they work really well.

call your dentist and tell them about the problem. They will probably prescribe you something to calm you down, like Ativan.

Let me know if I can help.

All the best :D
 
F

fionaa

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Oh My Goodness :o What dentist do you go to because thats EXACTLY what my dentist called it the 'Magic Gel'

:o I go to a private one in leamington spa ' Euston Place' what about you?
Thats very starange but i thought my dentist was treating me like i was 2
i didnt think i needed to be treated like that tho :)
 
T

Traumatized

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:o I go to a private one in leamington spa ' Euston Place' what about you?
Thats very starange but i thought my dentist was treating me like i was 2
i didnt think i needed to be treated like that tho :)
Oh, It isn't my same dentist then. Mines 'Kirkpatrick dental practice' Their really nice and Dr. Kirkpatrick tells me just to call him Cliff :p
 
F

fionaa

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Oh, It isn't my same dentist then. Mines 'Kirkpatrick dental practice' Their really nice and Dr. Kirkpatrick tells me just to call him Cliff :p

Aw. Sounds Like Youve Made A Soul Mate Lol
I Hope You Very Happy With Your Dentist
i dont mean to sound sarcastic :)
 
brit

brit

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Topical anaesthesia which we tend to call 'numbing cream' on here....is commonly used and any dentist should be able to provide it if you ask even if they don't routinely offer it. They do have to leave it long enough and still inject slowly. If they refuse, vote with your feet and go elsewhere..NB some dentists can do painless injections witout it especially if using TheWand.

Magic cream, magic gel, numbing cream, topical, ...anyone got any other names for it?

No reason not to use 'euphemisims' (= childish language?) with adults..it helps you have a more positive image in mind which helps reduce your sensitivity to pain....it's a sort of hypnotic suggestion I suppose.....two of my favourite dentists have both routinely said 'we'll just get you numbed up' rather than 'I'll just give you an injection now" or worse yet 'do you want an injection?' They use this positive non-threatening language with all their patients as far as I am aware..it makes their life easier as their patients are more relaxed as a result...so don't knock the childlike language is my advice.

 
F

fionaa

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Okay That Was Bad Of Me Then (N) :confused:
to be honest i should have just let her done it i dont know what provoked me :/
:hidesbehindsofa:
 
T

Traumatized

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Uh-Oh. They don't have laughing gas OR the wand :o Now I'm pretty scared again. They have the numbing gel though, which is good :innocent: Anybody got any ideas for keeping me calm? I so don't want to freak out :redface:

From Traumatized (A.K.A - Holly)
 
I

ianto

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I can relate to you in a way as i have a phobia for needles (even tho i have peircings and tattooes) it is seeing it that does it to me, my dentist told me to put a little spot of bongela on every 30 mins or so on the day of my appoinment just the tiniest bit as it has a sort of numbing effect so when i get the jag it is still nippy but it isn't too bad and normally what i do is as she comes to me with the needles i shut my eyes tight and start to count and sometims i don't even get to 10 and its done just keep breating through your nose with deep breaths and count it will be over in seconds

another one i have been advised may help wih the entire treatment is taking my nintnedo or a book or something with me just anything to give you sme type of distraction, we have a tv in the room but i don't have much taste for loose women or diagnosis murder lol
 
G

Geraint

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Hi Traumatized, I'm sure your dentist should have numbing gel wivh they can apply to the gum prior to the injection. My previous dentist always got me to concentrate on my breathing whilst she gave me an injection, so I didn't feel anything. If I need any drilling done I always take a cd walkman / mp3 player with me with a relaxation cd. I find this helps me relax and drowns out the noise. Hope all goes well keep in touch.
 
brit

brit

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Hi Traumatized, I'm sure your dentist should have numbing gel wivh they can apply to the gum prior to the injection.

Ianto, I agree that sounds a bit cheapskate (even unprofessional) asking you to apply Bonjela yourself before your appointment:o. Kind NHS dentists in the 1970s used to use bonjela with children but it probably isn't as effective as the specially formulated topical aneasthetic gels which are available nowadays. Also she needs to inject slowly to give a comfortable injection..10 secs is probably too fast so no wonder you still find it pretty uncomfortable.
 
T

Traumatized

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10 secs is probably too fast so no wonder you still find it pretty uncomfortable.

WHAT??!! :o Its supposed to last TEN SECONDS? :o Thats scary! I wouldn't last that long, I'd freak out and pull his hand away from me! My old dentist just made it a really quick in and out, it lasted half a second :o But I'm still REALLY scared... Injections are worse when they're long... Aren't they?

From Traumatized :scared:
 
F

FinnishGirl

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No, in this case the slower the better! If your dentist will inject slowly, you'll hardly notice it at all! I know it would instinctively feel better to have it done in half a second but our phobic instinct is wrong. It would hurt done that way.
 
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letsconnect

letsconnect

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I'm not sure, but maybe it depends on the area which is being numbed. Some areas you may need to inject more slowly than others? I would imagine that areas where there's less "space" for the solution you'd have to go more slowly so to avoid pressure.
 

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