Front teeth removal at a young age.

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escowen

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Hi everyone I am seventeen years old, and I recently saw a dentist for the first time. I grew up with a single dad who didn't know the ins and outs of everything. When we went to the dentist they did the usual check around the mouth and it wasn't good. I only initially went to the dentist as a referral from an emergency one who said a similar thing. The dentist then booked me in for six two hour dental 'sessions'. My fear of the dentist is indescribably bad. During the check up he said it was very likely they would have to remove my front teeth and put partial dentures in. At seventeen is this bad? What will the six sessions entail?
 
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MountainMama

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I have no advice on what the six sessions will mean, or what will happen. One of the dentists on here can probably help you with that.

I just want to say that it is great that you are getting in to the dentist now. Even if you are feeling overwhelmed, just taking that first step is huge! As far as losing the front teeth, better to have them out if they are going tl cause problems. My brother-in-law broke his front teeth at 16, and had to have them removed. He had a partial denture for years, and no one could even tell the difference. He ended up getting implants years later.

I wish you luck on your dental sessions!
 
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escowen

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Thank you! I honestly get so frightened about it all, my sessions don't start till February and I keep myself awake at night with sheer worry and panic. It's the feeling of judge. I hope they can save them as the dentist did say there was work to be done on the other teeth but I remember just walking out that day in tears. I don't eat anything that isn't liquid anymore and barely drink.
 
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MountainMama

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Thank you! I honestly get so frightened about it all, my sessions don't start till February and I keep myself awake at night with sheer worry and panic. It's the feeling of judge. I hope they can save them as the dentist did say there was work to be done on the other teeth but I remember just walking out that day in tears. I don't eat anything that isn't liquid anymore and barely drink.

Do not worry about being judged. I know that is easy to say, but dentists see much worse on a regular basis. Their job is to help get your teeth healthy. They will not be judging you...if they act judgmental, you need to find a new dentist!

Plus, having great dental hygeine and going to a dentist on a regular basis doesn't guarantee good teeth either. Genetics can play a role. I went to the dentist every six months for cleanings, and recently have had to have more work done than most people I know (two root canals, three extractions, an apicoectomy, and another apico next week). My husband also had regular cleanings, but bad teeth run in his family and his tooth enamel has always been soft, so his teeth crack and get cavities easily.

Instead of worrying about the procedures, try thinking ahead to how good it will feel when they are done, and you have healthy teeth!
 
Judythecat

Judythecat

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My friend’s husband knocked his front teeth out in a car accident when he was about your age, and I had no idea he had what he calls “his plate” until he told me. I’d known him for years by then. He says his partials look better than his natural teeth ever did!

Do you think it might help to contact the dentist and ask for a breakdown on what the treatment is? Perhaps you could send an email, or ask your dad to ring for you? Usually you would be given a “treatment plan” which tells you exactly what’s going to be done, and which specific teeth need work.
 
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escowen

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My friend’s husband knocked his front teeth out in a car accident when he was about your age, and I had no idea he had what he calls “his plate” until he told me. I’d known him for years by then. He says his partials look better than his natural teeth ever did!

Do you think it might help to contact the dentist and ask for a breakdown on what the treatment is? Perhaps you could send an email, or ask your dad to ring for you? Usually you would be given a “treatment plan” which tells you exactly what’s going to be done, and which specific teeth need work.

I tried asking my dentist that following the first appointment, as he had been shouting all these technical terms at the dental nurse and I had no clue what was going on. When I asked him about what would happen he said that there would be three two hour appointments with a few extractions and that was it. A few hours after I got home, a receptionist rang and asked to range appointments. She went through the times and dates etc... and then after the third one she continued. I thought they might have the wrong patient etc... so I said My dentist said there would be three sessions with him. I was then told by the receptionist that I was seeing a different dentist, and would be undergoing six sessions. I was then super panicky as I am sure you can imagine so I asked to speak to my dentist. I was told Oh, he won't until the end of the month so I then said can I speak to the lady carrying out these procedures and the receptionist told me no.

All I can remember him shouting out during the appointment was Two Erupted teeth, A single Amalgram filling and Two extractions. I look at that and think how can that possibly last six sessions when there is only five teeth being worked on [assuming I didn't miss anything].

I am just so unsure what to do about it all, I feel so overwhelmed by everything and the practice seem to offer me no support or advice. My sessions aren't until Mid Feb, so it feels like a impending doom.
 
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escowen

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Do not worry about being judged. I know that is easy to say, but dentists see much worse on a regular basis. Their job is to help get your teeth healthy. They will not be judging you...if they act judgmental, you need to find a new dentist!

Plus, having great dental hygeine and going to a dentist on a regular basis doesn't guarantee good teeth either. Genetics can play a role. I went to the dentist every six months for cleanings, and recently have had to have more work done than most people I know (two root canals, three extractions, an apicoectomy, and another apico next week). My husband also had regular cleanings, but bad teeth run in his family and his tooth enamel has always been soft, so his teeth crack and get cavities easily.

Instead of worrying about the procedures, try thinking ahead to how good it will feel when they are done, and you have healthy teeth!

Thank you! :you-rock:
 
Judythecat

Judythecat

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I tried asking my dentist that following the first appointment, as he had been shouting all these technical terms at the dental nurse and I had no clue what was going on. When I asked him about what would happen he said that there would be three two hour appointments with a few extractions and that was it. A few hours after I got home, a receptionist rang and asked to range appointments. She went through the times and dates etc... and then after the third one she continued. I thought they might have the wrong patient etc... so I said My dentist said there would be three sessions with him. I was then told by the receptionist that I was seeing a different dentist, and would be undergoing six sessions. I was then super panicky as I am sure you can imagine so I asked to speak to my dentist. I was told Oh, he won't until the end of the month so I then said can I speak to the lady carrying out these procedures and the receptionist told me no.

All I can remember him shouting out during the appointment was Two Erupted teeth, A single Amalgram filling and Two extractions. I look at that and think how can that possibly last six sessions when there is only five teeth being worked on [assuming I didn't miss anything].

I am just so unsure what to do about it all, I feel so overwhelmed by everything and the practice seem to offer me no support or advice. My sessions aren't until Mid Feb, so it feels like a impending doom.

No wonder you feel overwhelmed. I would contact them and ask for a written treatment plan, either via email or by post/that you collect. It is much easier to panic about the unknown.
 
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escowen

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No wonder you feel overwhelmed. I would contact them and ask for a written treatment plan, either via email or by post/that you collect. It is much easier to panic about the unknown.

Are they legally obligated to give me one?
 
Judythecat

Judythecat

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Are they legally obligated to give me one?

I am not sure about legally, but it is standard procedure. I’ve never had a load of treatment in one go, but have always been given one for anything I needed. It’s a printed sheet with pictures (outline drawings) of all the teeth and their numbers, then a list of text - eg, “UR 6 amalgam” would mean a filling in a top right back tooth. Usually you have to sign it to say you agree to the treatment. I wonder if your dad might have done it on your behalf because of your age?
 
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MountainMama

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Are they legally obligated to give me one?
I don't know where you live, but in the U.S. if you ask for your dental records and notes from the appointment, they must provide them. I am guessing it is the same everywhere. The notes would not be the same as a plan, but I can't imagine that they would refuse to provide one.

I would call (or have your dad call) and tell the receptionist that you are very nervous about not knowing what to expect, and that you would be more comfortable if you could mentally prepare before the appointments. I would also say that it would help the appointments go more smoothly if you were less anxious.
 
letsconnect

letsconnect

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Yes. In the Guidance "NEW Standards for the Dental Team" , which is published by the General Dental Council and sets out the standards of conduct, performance and ethics that govern dental professionals, it says:

2.3.6. You must give patients a written treatment plan, or plans, before their treatment starts and you should retain a copy in their notes. You should also ask patients to sign the treatment plan.

Is there any way you can choose your dentist? Have you read reviews about dental practices in your area? I realise that at 17, ones options can be somewhat restricted due to adult interference. However, in terms of consent, you are regarded as a "competent adult" once you are aged over 16 and "of sound mind". It would be considered an act of assault to violate your autonomy and right of self determination by providing treatment against your declared wishes.

It's so important to find a dentist you have a good relationship with though, especially if you are anxious :grouphug:
 
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Enarete

Enarete

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Dear Escowen,

first of all, you are doing a great job starting to take care of you teeth, that's great. I am sorry to read about how things are going right now and a bit surprised as well, I thought that dentists who handle patients like this do not exist anymore. I would expect a dentist to help you put you at ease and give you clear information about what's going on. Also making sure you see only one dentist in order to build some trust. It's not the best idea to try to treat your teeth before taking care of your fear.

Being anxious or not having much experience with how dental care works can make it complicated to voice preferences or demand information, but as letsconnect suggests it is your health and you should be able to decide what can happen and how. If anyhow possible for you right now, it might be a good idea to look for a practice that includes you in decisions about your treatment and explains things to you. This is also important for your future dental care. I wished you would have a kind dentist who explains to you what is happening in your mouth, gives you suggestions about treatment, puts you at ease and also does his/her best to make you feel confident enough to keep on going for exams and taking care of your dental health in the future.

It sounds like there will be some work ahead of you, but please remember that no matter how much work you need, the only thing that counts is that you want to tackle it now. If your front teeth will need to go that's certainly not the best news and you might need to get used to it but as mentioned above, you wouldn't believe how many people wear partial dentures and nobody notices.

All the best wishes and keep us posted and please, try to take good care of you in terms of eating and drinking. I know this might be hard at the moment and there is a lot of anxiety you are dealing with right now but taking care of yourself is very important.
 
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escowen

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Accrington
Hi everyone! I thought I should update you on everything as a thanks. We went into my dentist and asked for a written treatment plan, the dentist said he can’t give me one as he’s not decided what to do and when he said he would contact us by the end of the week but he didn’t. We then rang the practice and asked to switched dentists which they said was fine, my appointments however needed changing which to me was completely reasonable.

I had my first appointment this morning which was X Rays and a Oral Health Education session. I told her about my worries and explained everything and she said that the dentist should of sat me down and explained everything. She said my front teeth are saveable but that they only have 10 or so years left in them until they won’t be there anymore. She explained my treatment and answered questions and make the whole thing so easy.

I’m having 4 root canals done on my front teeth
Two Extractions
Two Amalgram fillings
and a crown.

I’m so glad that you guys convinced me to go because now she’s explained everything it looks like it’s going to be for the better! I honestly can’t thank you all enough
 
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Wolfsrule18

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Oct 5, 2017
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When I was only 18 I had 22 teeth removed including all my front ones. A year and a half later and I’m very happy that it was done. I am eating much better then I ever did before and don’t have constant tooth aches. Out of the remaining 10 teeth I have one still needs to be pulled but the other 9 are healthy. I know right now it is really hard and really scary but in the end I think you’ll be glad.
 
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