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Gold Foil

G

Girl

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Apr 29, 2015
Messages
7
This dental restoration is sometimes referred to as direct gold, but more commonly, as Gold foil.

Can anyone advise there are any UK dentists (or W. Europe) which offer this option as a restoration?
I know it was more common in yesteryear; there are dentists out there, specifically in US and Canada. Sadly it is not taught in dental school and consequently has become rare...at the same time few individuals want gold in their mouth these days.

Been searching for ages, it would be very appreciated if someone could point me in the right direction.
 
C

comfortdentist

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The is the first request I have heard for this restoration in decades.
So you are right it is pure gold which when surfaced flamed briefly it will adhere to itself. You make a preparation that is undercut and then you slowly tap into place many many layers of gold then finish the surface. When well done the edges are undetectable with a sharp explorer, very gentle to the gums and never breaks down.
You can still get caries if elsewhere though.
It is demanding of the dentist. My class was the last one required to perform these at University of Florida.
Your best bet is to find a 60 year old plus dentist that doesn't take any insurance plans and only performs high end dentistry and then you will have to look. check with these people:
list of goldfoil dentists. http://www.aagfo.org/Documents/AAGFO_Members_ 10-17.pdf
 
G

Girl

Junior member
Joined
Apr 29, 2015
Messages
7
The is the first request I have heard for this restoration in decades.
So you are right it is pure gold which when surfaced flamed briefly it will adhere to itself. You make a preparation that is undercut and then you slowly tap into place many many layers of gold then finish the surface. When well done the edges are undetectable with a sharp explorer, very gentle to the gums and never breaks down.
You can still get caries if elsewhere though.
It is demanding of the dentist. My class was the last one required to perform these at University of Florida.
Your best bet is to find a 60 year old plus dentist that doesn't take any insurance plans and only performs high end dentistry and then you will have to look. check with these people:
list of goldfoil dentists. http://www.aagfo.org/Documents/AAGFO_Members_ 10-17.pdf

Really appreciate your response Dr Kimse!
I've been looking into this for several years and not made much progress in terms of finding a dentist who practices this. Really need to replace a decade old amalgam and I've seen various (older) dentists and they are just not trained in this technique. Some advised that they can do an alloy that's only 70-75% gold.
In my research, I've seen pictures showing gold foil was used to restore 3/4 of tooth surface. but I was told that it was only suited for the most smallest caries.

Again, thank you for your insight.
 
C

comfortdentist

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If the restoration isn't suitable for gold foil then an onlay may be made with a really fine alloy. My recommendation is Degussa(German) alloy called Degudent® G which is all gold and platinum with trace amounts of other rare earth elements that similar to platinum like indium and rhodium. It handles very well with exceptional tolerance of the gingiva. While it is recommended for porcelain fused to metal crowns it may be also used for onlays. Again anyone who does gold foils will be comfortable with gold onlays.
 
brit

brit

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Don't know if it helps but it is typically possible to get 'yellow gold' crown/onlays with a 70-75% gold content. I think any higher gold content is too soft for most restorations. I think 'white gold' would have a much lower gold content. It all depends on the laboratory a dentist uses, if they are not doing direct gold work themselves which is now very rare as you said.
In the US there is something called 'Tucker study clubs' for dentists who like to work in gold. Maybe they have some UK based members you could track down?
 
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C

comfortdentist

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Don't know if it helps but it is typically possible to get 'yellow gold' crown/onlays with a 70-75% gold content. I think any higher gold content is too soft for most restorations. I think 'white gold' would have a much lower gold content. It all depends on the laboratory a dentist uses, if they are not doing direct gold work themselves which is now very rare as you said.
In the US there is something called 'Tucker study clubs' for dentists who like to work in gold. Maybe they have some UK based members you could track down?
The degudent alloy i mentioned is 86% and 11% platinum and is rather hard so suitable for all types of crowns. I used it for years.
 
G

Girl

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Apr 29, 2015
Messages
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If the restoration isn't suitable for gold foil then an onlay may be made with a really fine alloy. My recommendation is Degussa(German) alloy called Degudent® .
I have a couple more questions. Obviously, with replacing the old Amalgam (which my dentist has said failed quite a while ago). I'd like to keep as much tooth structure as possible....would it be better for me to remove it with my current dentist, (who practices safe removal) and get a temp filling before going overseas? Or removing it all in one go with a dentist who offers GF?

Thanks.
 
G

Girl

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Can suitability for GF be determined from looking at an x-tray of the molar in question?
 
C

comfortdentist

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Gold foil is rarely used in molars. Typically use cast gold.
 
G

Girl

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Appreciate your response Dr Kimse.

cast gold is another word for gold alloy (70-75% gold content)? Due to other strong reasons I'm very keen to avoid the other alloys. In my search I've seen examples of GF used in similar sized fillings to my own.

I'd like to keep as much tooth structure as possible....would it be better for me to remove it with my current dentist, (who practices safe removal) and get a temp filling before going overseas? Or removing it all in one go with a dentist who offers GF?

Thanks
 
C

comfortdentist

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"If the restoration isn't suitable for gold foil then an onlay may be made with a really fine alloy. My recommendation is Degussa(German) alloy called Degudent® G which is all gold and platinum with trace amounts of other rare earth elements that similar to platinum like indium and rhodium. It handles very well with exceptional tolerance of the gingiva. While it is recommended for porcelain fused to metal crowns it may be also used for onlays. Again anyone who does gold foils will be comfortable with gold onlays." Degudent is 88% gold and rest of it is platinum and other rare earth alloys.

As to "practice safe removal" basically anyone who promotes this is promoting quackery.
 
G

Girl

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Apr 29, 2015
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Curious to know about you experience with fillings in general – if you have them, how many what type of filling(s) how long have you had them and have you encountered any issues.

Feel free to share your experience.
 
T

Thephilsblogbar

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Apr 23, 2015
Messages
653
Location
United Kingdom
silver fillings, no idea how many fillings.

I have had them wear down a bit over the year, and broke one on a piece of fish batter from the fish and chip shop. so I don't eat fish from chip shop now, my parents have forgotten about this and I have to keep reminding them if my Dad suggest fish
 
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thisisme

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Aug 17, 2012
Messages
247
7 fillings. Three from when I was 14 and 4 from this past year (I am 32). The three fillings I had when I was 14 were silver at the time but replaced this past year with white fillings. One of those original fillings fell out and the tooth cracked, but it was able to be refilled.

The biggest struggle I have with fillings is getting my bite to feel right and not experiencing pain when eating (due to high fillings). I always draw a blank when they ask me to bite down... it’s like how do I bite? How do I chew? I can’t chew without food in my mouth... you tell me if it’s right. 😂
 
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