How do dentists extract molars with very twisty roots?

M

MountainMama

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 1, 2018
Messages
2,465
I know there have to be methods that can be applied.

Today, I got an implant put in for my lower first molar. Both the periodontist who placed the implant and his assistant commented on the roots on the 2nd molar next to it when they took an x ray to check the implant. The periodontist said, “I hope I never have to extract that tooth!” Then the assistant said the roots were extremely curvy.
My new dentist said that tooth has a deep filling and it may be problematic in the future.
Brief history on that tooth...in my early 20’s I broke the tooth above it and the dentist I saw put a very poor fitting crown on it. To make the crown fit, after shaving off as much as they could off the crown, she basically took all the cusps off the lower molar (the curvy root one). She left the tooth in poor shape and I never went back there.
 
M

MountainMama

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 1, 2018
Messages
2,465
And I do realize I am creating anxiety over a future possibility but just knowing that there are ways to deal with tricky molars will help alleviate anxiety. I couldn’t ask the surgeon as my mouth was numb and I had just gotten the implant placed.
 
G

Galwaygirl

Junior member
Joined
Mar 25, 2021
Messages
11
I had my 2 back molars extracted in October. I have a small jaw and my teeth have big roots that are also curved. My dentist referred me to an oral /maxfax surgeon to have them removed. During the extraction he also discovered they were fused to the jaw bone. He tried to extract in the usual way at first but when the tooth wouldnt budge (being fused to the bone), he then had to section the teeth and remove them piece by piece. It took about 90 minutes in total and it took about a week for the pain to resolve afterwards. The procedure itself wasnt painful as I as well numbed up but it was a little stressful as it took so long. Mine was done in the usual dentists chair, but I think if he had known how complicated it was going to be with the roots fused to the bone he would have done it under anesthesia. It would have been fairly straightforward by just sectioning the tooth if they were not attached to the jaw bone, which I believe is not very common?
 
M

MountainMama

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 1, 2018
Messages
2,465
I had my 2 back molars extracted in October. I have a small jaw and my teeth have big roots that are also curved. My dentist referred me to an oral /maxfax surgeon to have them removed. During the extraction he also discovered they were fused to the jaw bone. He tried to extract in the usual way at first but when the tooth wouldnt budge (being fused to the bone), he then had to section the teeth and remove them piece by piece. It took about 90 minutes in total and it took about a week for the pain to resolve afterwards. The procedure itself wasnt painful as I as well numbed up but it was a little stressful as it took so long. Mine was done in the usual dentists chair, but I think if he had known how complicated it was going to be with the roots fused to the bone he would have done it under anesthesia. It would have been fairly straightforward by just sectioning the tooth if they were not attached to the jaw bone, which I believe is not very common?
Yikes, that sounds complicated! I am glad you got through it! It also is reassuring because it sounds like they can section the tooth to remove it in pieces. It was just more than a little disconcerting to have an endodontist and now two oral surgeons comment on how difficult it would be to remove.
 
G

Galwaygirl

Junior member
Joined
Mar 25, 2021
Messages
11
You will be fine if it comes to it, just be prepared for a longer time in the chair I think. Looking back it wasnt bad at all it just took a long time to get the teeth out that my anxiety was up as I didnt expect it. My surgeon even commented this is why I prefer to have my patients asleep when I get case like this so I can use bad language :grin:. Mine was a particularly difficult case but also not a common one.
 
Gordon

Gordon

Administrator
Staff member
Verified dentist
Joined
Oct 25, 2005
Messages
7,206
Also keep in mind that sometimes teeth that look a nightmare on an x-ray finish up being dead easy to remove (and vice versa of course!) but normally sectioning the roots and wiggling them out individually is easy enough.
 
M

MountainMama

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 1, 2018
Messages
2,465
Also keep in mind that sometimes teeth that look a nightmare on an x-ray finish up being dead easy to remove (and vice versa of course!) but normally sectioning the roots and wiggling them out individually is easy enough.
Thank you Gordon! That is very reassuring! I know that tooth will most likely have to come out in the future, especially since there is no opposing tooth above it. I am going to be able to put it out of my mind (somewhat) and not let the anxiety get the best of me.
 
Gordon

Gordon

Administrator
Staff member
Verified dentist
Joined
Oct 25, 2005
Messages
7,206
Also depends why it's coming out! If it's down to gum disease then that makes it much easier...
 
M

MountainMama

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 1, 2018
Messages
2,465
Also depends why it's coming out! If it's down to gum disease then that makes it much easier...
Nope...I have very healthy gums. It would be due to irreversible pulpitis. I have a very deep filling in that tooth and it is already somewhat sensitive. The endodontist told me that there was no way anyone would touch those roots with a root canal. Her advice was to leave it alone until I couldn’t handle it anymore, then extract it.
 
Gordon

Gordon

Administrator
Staff member
Verified dentist
Joined
Oct 25, 2005
Messages
7,206
In that case the abscess will be eating away a little bit of the alveolar bone too, every little helps :)
 
Top