How do you know if fillings are needed?

G

Guest

Guest
Hi again all,

As the subject line says I'm wondering how one would know when a filling is needed? I had a couple when I was younger but I don't remember why I needed them or what it felt like before I had them. Years on I don't know what it feels like to need a filling. Does the tooth feel sticky? Does it hurt around the area that needs to be filled? I have a two teeth that if caught in the right place can hurt a little, and if I 'bite' in a different way to usual one tooth feels a bit sticky. I'm presuming these will need filling but I don't know for sure as I've not had much experience with it.

All the best,

Faye
 
G

Guest

Guest
Well, with my teeth i was easily able to identify the cavity i had because of this persistant brownish spot that would not go away. It grew into a hole and became obvious that there was decay! As far as my back teeth I've noticed 2 cavities after brushing one night and noticing brownish spots in the grooves of the teeth.

But really, the best thing to do is go to the dentist and have a check up. My dad never seems to notice when he has a cavity.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Thinking back to my last two fillings:

1. One of my molars developed a brown spot on the front side of the tooth (didn't hurt).

2. Then I broke off a bit off another tooth. When I saw the dentist he said that actually I'd broken off a bit off a previous filling.

Both fillings were complete painless (got the numbing gel and the injection, but didn't feel any of it).

Bear in mind that if a tooth needs a filling it is not necessarily visible to the nacked eye. For example, you can't "see" what's happening between the teeth. The dentist will take x-rays to "see" everything.

Remember, if it turns out that you need several fillings, you can still ask for short appointments and have them done one at a time (that's what I prefer).

G.
 
G

Guest

Guest
It can be quite impossible for the layperson to know if a filling is needed. Some brown spots can just be discoloration, pitting, arrested decay which doesn't need treatment or whatever. Basically, a filling is needed if there is active decay. Decayed tooth tissue is soft, and a dentist would be able to identify it. Most dentists these days will avoid random "poking", as this could damage weakened enamel which has a chance to remineralize. A dentist will be able to use an explorer gently to determine if an area of dying tissue needs to be removed and a filling placed.
 
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