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How does a flipper stay in? *warning...picture of flipper

M

MountainMama

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I got my flipper today. I have my consult with the oral surgeon tomorrow for the extraction and bone grafting for my front tooth. I am absolutely terrified.

I look at the flipper and wonder if it will fall out while I am talking. Obviously I can't try it on as I still have the tooth. I see where the plastic curves around each upper tooth, but will it stay in? I had thought they had a metal hook or something on one set of teeth. It

I was too nervous at the dentist's today to ask. This front tooth extraction has got me more terrified than any other work I have had done. I barely was able to listen to them tell me how to take care of it.

Here is what it looks like.
1565014072933583090299.jpg

It also made me nervous that the same lab that made this made my nightguard, which I also got today. It didn't fit right, and the dentist had to make all kinds of adjustments. He told the hygienist he was never using that lab again.
 
Gordon

Gordon

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It sort of wiggles into the gaps around your back teeth, if you look at them there are undercut areas on the palate sides that the denture can be wiggled into.
A single tooth one like that should be reasonably stable. They almost always need a fair bit of adjustment to fit at first.

Expect to lisp for a few days, to produce a bit more saliva, so you feel you need to swallow more often and expect that your food will taste a bit odd too. Also beware hot food and drinks, the roof of your mouth is armour plated but the rest of it isn't :)
 
M

MountainMama

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It sort of wiggles into the gaps around your back teeth, if you look at them there are undercut areas on the palate sides that the denture can be wiggled into.
A single tooth one like that should be reasonably stable. They almost always need a fair bit of adjustment to fit at first.

Expect to lisp for a few days, to produce a bit more saliva, so you feel you need to swallow more often and expect that your food will taste a bit odd too. Also beware hot food and drinks, the roof of your mouth is armour plated but the rest of it isn't :)

Thank you for the advice! My dentist warned me I probably have to come in for adjustments. I am really dreading this, but thank you for explaining how they stay in. I can feel what you mean about the undercut areas, so that makes sense.

I didn't think about hot drinks! I am glad you mentioned that. I have been reading up on flippers on here, so was forewarned about the excess saliva and lisping. That will adjust, won't it?

I go to the oral surgeon today for the consult. I am trying to write down questions so that I don't get too nervous and forget to ask. I am more comfortable with him than the dentist, strangely enough. I have a bunch of questions about the implant for him that I want to ask.
 
Gordon

Gordon

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Lisping and saliva generally are back to normal in 48 hrs or so. Usually it helps to keep the denture in all the time for the first 24 hrs, take it out for a quick rinse under the cold tap and put it straight back in again.
After 48hrs its usually best to take it out overnight, but I appreciate some folks won't want to do that...

There is a real knack in getting them in and out at first, so don't panic if it seems very tricky, but after a few weeks most people seem to be able to put it in and out without even touching it, just using their tongue :)
 
M

MountainMama

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Lisping and saliva generally are back to normal in 48 hrs or so. Usually it helps to keep the denture in all the time for the first 24 hrs, take it out for a quick rinse under the cold tap and put it straight back in again.
After 48hrs its usually best to take it out overnight, but I appreciate some folks won't want to do that...

There is a real knack in getting them in and out at first, so don't panic if it seems very tricky, but after a few weeks most people seem to be able to put it in and out without even touching it, just using their tongue :)

Oh good, so the lisping and excess saliva won't last long. Thank you so much for your help!

The thought of taking it out after surgery terrifies me. I know they will probably show me how to do it at the surgery. I am afraid I will push it against the bone grafting too hard or something like that. I am afraid to sleep in it for the same reason. I won't be able to wear my nightguard with it in.

The surgeon told me today that he is going to do bone grafting and a bone wrap in the front, since I had an apico earlier this year.

It is scheduled for September 10. He combined that appointment with an appointment I already had to get a lower implant for my first molar. He knew I would not be able to handle two surgeries in the same month. I had been planning on putting off one of them for a few months, but he was willing to schedule me for longer and do them together, with nitrous. I am seriously considering asking for IV sedation instead, but the other surgeries are so expensive already. Nitrous is fairly inexpensive.
 
Gordon

Gordon

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I wouldn't let you out of the room until you'd shown me you could put it in and out by yourself :)
Don't worry about the graft, you really won't be able to do any damage with the denture. You will save a lot of bother for yourself if you sleep in it for the first couple of nights, trust me on this one!
 
M

MountainMama

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I wouldn't let you out of the room until you'd shown me you could put it in and out by yourself :)
Don't worry about the graft, you really won't be able to do any damage with the denture. You will save a lot of bother for yourself if you sleep in it for the first couple of nights, trust me on this one!

Okay, good to know. Thank you! I will leave it in for the first two nights. Take it out and rinse it after 24 hours, then pop it back in.
 
S

SallyUK

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:( You are having the tooth extracted. Sorry to read you are still dealing with things. I really can report positive things from my experience with a flipper (I'm not going to say I love it but..) It stays in fine. As Gordon says it hooks into place (somehow). Quite remarkable really.

My dentist got me to take it out and put it back in before I left after the extraction and I left it there for 24 hours. It gave me reassurance about the site/blood clot actually. I had to go back the next day for an adjustment and once more a week or so later. I was very anxious/self conscious taking it out and putting in for a while. Adjusting to that didn't take long and now I don't hyperfocus on it and it's OK.

As Gordon says, the speech and extra saliva do settle quite quickly. Although the whole process was stressful, the way we are able to adapt was the positive flip side. Good luck and try not to worry too much. The experience will be easier to handle than the pre anxiety x
 
M

MountainMama

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Thank you, SallyUK! That is reassuring that you adjusted quickly. Yep, the tooth is coming out. The good nees is that the surgeon said based on the bone grafting and wrap he is going to do, it may be easier to put the implant in at the time of extraction, so I won't have to wait as long for my crown. It depends on what he finds.
I have a feeling I am going to lose a few more molars before this is all over, as I still have more teeth causing issues. I just want all this over with. I am so tired of my mouth hurting all the time.
 
S

SallyUK

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Thank you, SallyUK! That is reassuring that you adjusted quickly. Yep, the tooth is coming out. The good nees is that the surgeon said based on the bone grafting and wrap he is going to do, it may be easier to put the implant in at the time of extraction, so I won't have to wait as long for my crown. It depends on what he finds.
I have a feeling I am going to lose a few more molars before this is all over, as I still have more teeth causing issues. I just want all this over with. I am so tired of my mouth hurting all the time.
Wishing you the best outcome possible for the extraction. I wish it were possible for you to know when you will be free of pain. Awful to go through. I’m currently good dental wise and look back and see the level of stress I had with my infections and consequences, so you have my empathy.
 
M

MountainMama

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Wishing you the best outcome possible for the extraction. I wish it were possible for you to know when you will be free of pain. Awful to go through. I’m currently good dental wise and look back and see the level of stress I had with my infections and consequences, so you have my empathy.

It is SO good to hear that you are doing well with your teeth now! I think mine have been chain reactions, where extracting molars changed my bite, causing more pressure on one side, causing issues on that side, then when those teeth were out, issues on the other side. I got my new custom nightguard and ever since I started wearing it, the only bottom molars I have (all on left) have been hurting nonstop during the day. I think biting against the hard plastic is making the issue worse, but the alternative is not wearing it, and that would be just as bad, if not worse. I go back tomorrow for an adjustment on the nightguard for the front tooth (it is still putting too much pressure on it), so I am going to mention the molars as well
 
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