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How long can the periodontal ligament stay inflamed or irritated?

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GypsySoul

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Oct 16, 2015
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1
If I have had a lot of dental work done in an area over the course of many weeks (fillings, bite adjustments, a re-do of one of the first fillings, more bite adjustments) and X-rays look good but it is still hurting all AROUND the tooth, even up into my face/nose now, can it be the periodontal ligament is *still* inflamed/bruised?

If I take longer to heal than normal generally
(not terribly longer but a little - like a recent root canal hurt the most about 5/6 days after it was done, and took three weeks before I could do the crown prep instead of the standard two)
how long could this go on? (taking into account that I am already not chewing at all, because chewing anywhere in my mouth makes it hurt more. )

If it IS an inflamed / irritated ligament, a RC won't really do much, will it?

Would getting the tooth extracted make it stop hurting?
If yes, how long would you wait it out to see if it will calm down on its own from the time the last work in the area was done, if bite looks good, and antibiotics didn't help, and X-rays are not showing anything, before thinking about an extraction?

:confused:
 
Last edited:
Dr. Daniel

Dr. Daniel

Well-known member
Verified dentist
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Nov 2, 2010
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1,970
Location
The Hague , Holland
Hi,

It sounds like your dentist has suggested you a root canal as treatment for your constant pain from this tooth and you are sceptic about it (rather have the tooth extracted than a RC). Am I wrong?

Regarding your question: a root canal treatment helps per definition when there is an inflammation at the periodontal ligament.

My reccomendation: you can go have a second opinion.
 
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ShyRage

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Aug 16, 2021
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4
Location
Texas
Bringing back this old thread...

At the beginning of this year Feb (2021) I had got four crowns placed on the front anterior of my mouth. 7,8,9, and 10. From the start and after the procedure, the number 9 has always hurt. I did get a root canal even though the endodontist said there was nothing wrong with the tooth but stated it may just be one of those things that can fix the problem. The problem continued and the endo ended up going all the way to the tip. After talking to the dentist that did the crown, we both agreed that the crown itself looked to be protruding out and so it was taken off and eventually placed with a better-looking crown. The annoying pain was still there. On a scale from 1 to 10 with 10 being the highest of pain, I'm about a 4 which is why I called it an annoying pain. Every other crown feels like a normal tooth except for this one. Eventually, I went to another Endo who also stated he couldn't find anything wrong with the tooth. He did however believe that there was something wrong because when he pressed on the tooth, my face squirmed and my body shook. He was at a loss and told me to wait till about March of next year and see if it goes away.

This feeling has been here since February and has never gone away. It hurts more if I press on the back of the crown pressing it forward. Has anyone ever experienced this scenario? I have a new appointment with a board-certified cosmetic dentist come January. Any ideas from both dentists and patients are welcomed.

* I do have an appointment with a periodontist as well in Janurary. After doing my own personal research, it may be Percussion sensitivity in an endo’ed tooth. Not 100% because i am not a professional
 
Gordon

Gordon

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I assume that somebody at some point in this has actually checked the bite carefully on this crown?
 
S

ShyRage

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Texas
Personally, I would assume. I can't speak for anyone else but that was one of the first things checked in my case. Pertaining to my case, have you experienced the same thing while practicing?
 
Gordon

Gordon

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Yes, it always turned out that there was a high contact somewhere in the occlusion that we hadn't caught. It was just a case of getting the patient to move around as much as possible while checking till the high area revealed itself. I believe there is a snazzy new computer system around now which can do it almost automatically but I've not used it.
 
S

ShyRage

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Location
Texas
SO I just want to make sure, when you say high contact; are you talking about maybe a tooth hitting another tooth? Is the new snazzy system you mentioned called the "T scan (Digital Occlusal Analysis)"? If so, that was one of the very first things done in my case. I actually had to drive out from my area to another dentist that provided the T scan option. In both cases, both checkout ok with nothing touching the number 8. At this point, IM not sure if biological width or percussion sensitivity would be playing a role in this. This is just my own research though and none of the professionals have caught it yet. Up to date, it's been my dentist, two endos, and one periodontist. One of the endos mentioned not wanting to discredit me since looking at the x-ray, there was obviously nothing wrong. Keep in mind, these are advanced 3d systems. I'm at a loss not and I'm hoping my periodontist in January can help me.

If you would like to see pictures of my x rays and pictures themselves, let me know and I'll inbox them to you.
 
Gordon

Gordon

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Yes, a tooth hitting someplace harder than the rest in your case somewhere in the region of the affected tooth.
I'm not familiar with the snazzy new system, so can't really comment on it.
Sometimes you have to be really patient, use extremely thin marking paper and try to get the patient to move their jaw in as many different angles as possible, as well as swallowing, pretending to chew stuff etc.
There's not much point in seeing x-rays, without physically seeing you they won't add much I don't think.
 
S

ShyRage

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Location
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Yes, a tooth hitting someplace harder than the rest in your case somewhere in the region of the affected tooth.
I'm not familiar with the snazzy new system, so can't really comment on it.
Sometimes you have to be really patient, use extremely thin marking paper and try to get the patient to move their jaw in as many different angles as possible, as well as swallowing, pretending to chew stuff etc.
There's not much point in seeing x-rays, without physically seeing you they won't add much I don't think.
Okay. Well for sure the tooth isn't being hit. I will be going to a new dentist come January. This person is well familiar with cosmetics and I hope she can give me some insight. In the meantime, maybe someone reading the thread would have encountered something similar and will be able to chime in.
 
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