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Injections

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tazey

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Hampshire U.k
Is there an alternative? a non medical person (who works at the hospital) told me there's a gel or cream they can use,if so what is it called so I can check the ingredients? (I'm in the uk)
 
Gordon

Gordon

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No. Gel or cream can be used to numb the surface but not the teeth.
 
Enarete

Enarete

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Injections do not have to be painful at all, @tazey. I know your dental team hasn‘t had awakened your trust up to now, but many dentists are familiar with techniques to make the delivery of anesthetic comfortable.
 
Judythecat

Judythecat

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I had the gel when I had a root canal done by an endodontist - I think it is mainly used for children, but I am really scared of needles. I was able to get through the injections, even the one in the roof of my mouth, by concentrating on my breathing, squeezing something in my hand (I brought one of my cat’s bean-bag toys), and also keeping in my mind that they were going to mean the treatment was pain-free.
 
krlovesherkids777

krlovesherkids777

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I remember being deathly afraid of the anesthetic needles and wouldn't let any dentist near me with them.. my childhood dentist only used nitrious and no needles which was torturous basically. haven't had nitrous since. I kept those needles at bay until I was in dire straights needing some work from severe pain in a tooth and a dentist said I will not do the work if you don't let me give you this anesthetic and promised to be kind about it. Well. the way he said it was respectful, he took his time and Im glad I got the work needed done as I got relief.. as a first needle experience it wasn't bad. Never saw the guy again as I moved from college.. but.. I'm glad I took a huge step out of my comfort zone.. not easy..

You are a very strong person Tazey I personally think the needle is well worth it to get out of pain but it took me a long time and some very patient dentists to help me come to that conclusion.. Right now it seems as you have mentioned you feel unheard and basically unregarded and I'd be afraid to have any needles by that person.
 
T

tazey

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Feb 2, 2018
Messages
610
Location
Hampshire U.k
I remember being deathly afraid of the anesthetic needles and wouldn't let any dentist near me with them.. my childhood dentist only used nitrious and no needles which was torturous basically. haven't had nitrous since. I kept those needles at bay until I was in dire straights needing some work from severe pain in a tooth and a dentist said I will not do the work if you don't let me give you this anesthetic and promised to be kind about it. Well. the way he said it was respectful, he took his time and Im glad I got the work needed done as I got relief.. as a first needle experience it wasn't bad. Never saw the guy again as I moved from college.. but.. I'm glad I took a huge step out of my comfort zone.. not easy..

You are a very strong person Tazey I personally think the needle is well worth it to get out of pain but it took me a long time and some very patient dentists to help me come to that conclusion.. Right now it seems as you have mentioned you feel unheard and basically unregarded and I'd be afraid to have any needles by that person.
They had a cancellation so have an appointment Monday now (still have one in feb but they said something about 6 appointments till i don't know what?) there's no way I'm having it done+I've said it enough times i hate needles you cant/don't just get over a phobia.
 
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B

Birmanclaws

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Feb 18, 2018
Messages
49
I ALWAYS have the numbing jell. I make sure I ask for it, just in case they think I can do without it.
It really helps with the initial sting of the local anaesthetic. The periodontist who placed my implants had the best injecting technique ever; he jelled my gums and injected a small amount of anaesthetic, went away and did something else and then came back and gave me a bit more. He did this a couple of times and the experience was totally pain free, even the one in the palate (which is only given for surgery). Once you are numbed up you do not feel a thing.

Good luck on Monday. Do you know what they are doing?
 
T

tazey

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Joined
Feb 2, 2018
Messages
610
Location
Hampshire U.k
I ALWAYS have the numbing jell. I make sure I ask for it, just in case they think I can do without it.
It really helps with the initial sting of the local anaesthetic. The periodontist who placed my implants had the best injecting technique ever; he jelled my gums and injected a small amount of anaesthetic, went away and did something else and then came back and gave me a bit more. He did this a couple of times and the experience was totally pain free, even the one in the palate (which is only given for surgery). Once you are numbed up you do not feel a thing.

Good luck on Monday. Do you know what they are doing?
Thanks,no not really+it's first thing which isn't good as I don't sleep a lot so have to be up super early to get there.
 
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NETWizz

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Joined
May 15, 2013
Messages
102
You will be fine. Once you get the needle and it’s over you will realize it was not worth the anxiety.

I know this sounds strange but I was last juiced up Monday with a full carpule of Articaine, and it was no problem. I used to be apprehensive too with a fear of needles, but it is something I have got over by being a human pincushion, lol. Sometimes facing your fears does helps.

Go get this year’s flu shot and perhaps update your Tetnus too. I did!

I know this sounds crazy, but to me it actually kind of felt soothing and good like getting a deep tissue massage right as the drug goes in. The pain was only a 1 or 2 at worse not being objectionable... it was just a little gentle burning feeling and 30 seconds later complete relief of all pain.

I looked at the dentist and said, “Ahh. That felt good.” He shook his head, just smiled and said, “yeah but it tastes bitter.”
 
T

tazey

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Feb 2, 2018
Messages
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Location
Hampshire U.k
No it won't be happening,no one will be coming at me with needles.
 
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NETWizz

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May 15, 2013
Messages
102
No it won't be happening,no one will be coming at me with needles.
You are not in for a painful appointment.There is nothing to it.


Hopefully you don’t need any procedures that require the needle, but if you do it will be okay. I have been numbed three times with four injections this year, and that’s just at the dentist.

Also for the flu shot. I cannot say any of it was what I would describe as painful. The key is to just relax and let the provider work. They do their injections probably half a dozen times a day at any practice, yet when you are in there you have never heard anyone in agony; it would be bad for business. At worse it will be uncomfortable and you will feel some momentary pressure or discomfort.

You will get through it fine.
 
Niall Neeson

Niall Neeson

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Apr 18, 2019
Messages
107
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Ireland
No it won't be happening,no one will be coming at me with needles.
Hi Tazey,

It sounds like you have a true needle phobia.

That means that even if people tell you it’s going to be ok, that’s just not enough to convince your brain. I’m sure those fight or flight effects kick in even at the thought of it. Can I ask are your feelings the same about medical injections as well as dental?

A true phobia is actually classified as an anxiety disorder and requires a specialised approach to overcome it.

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) has been shown to be very effective in treating and curing needle phobias. It’s generally provided by a psychologist or psychotherapist over a number of sessions. It’s important to know that it can be overcome. It may surprise you to know that are lots of people out there who previously felt the same that have successfully re-trained their perception and response.

Hypnosis is another option that may facilitate things but I mention CBT particularly as there is a substantial body of research backing CBT for phobias and anxiety disorders.

May I ask where are you based in the UK?
 
T

tazey

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Joined
Feb 2, 2018
Messages
610
Location
Hampshire U.k
Hi Tazey,

It sounds like you have a true needle phobia.

That means that even if people tell you it’s going to be ok, that’s just not enough to convince your brain. I’m sure those fight or flight effects kick in even at the thought of it. Can I ask are your feelings the same about medical injections as well as dental?

A true phobia is actually classified as an anxiety disorder and requires a specialised approach to overcome it.

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) has been shown to be very effective in treating and curing needle phobias. It’s generally provided by a psychologist or psychotherapist over a number of sessions. It’s important to know that it can be overcome. It may surprise you to know that are lots of people out there who previously felt the same that have successfully re-trained their perception and response.

Hypnosis is another option that may facilitate things but I mention CBT particularly as there is a substantial body of research backing CBT for phobias and anxiety disorders.

May I ask where are you based in the UK?
Yes I've never been keen on them I can just about bare a blood test but take a diazepam first if I have one,but that can be kept out of sight+it's only in your arm. I don't see how it can be cured by feb (which is my next appointment) I know people that have done cbt+don't think it would work. I'm on the south coast.
 
Niall Neeson

Niall Neeson

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Ireland
Yes I've never been keen on them I can just about bare a blood test but take a diazepam first if I have one,but that can be kept out of sight+it's only in your arm. I don't see how it can be cured by feb (which is my next appointment) I know people that have done cbt+don't think it would work. I'm on the south coast.
Well Tazey, it’s up to you at the end of the day. The benefits of CBT for needle phobia extend well beyond one single visit in February. It could be a game changer for you in making dental (and medical) visits a lot easier for you.

If you’re happier to just endure it and do what you’ve been doing that’s ok but I presume by the fact you’ve posted here in the first place would indicate you’d like some help.

If you want me to look up a suitable CBT therapist in your area let me know. You can private message me if you like.

Niall
 
N

NETWizz

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May 15, 2013
Messages
102
I hope you were able to get some assistance because the quality of your life overall will be so much better. For example, would you rather experience a fever, cough, runny nose, sore throat, fatigue, and ear ache... OR a flu shot?

What if a shot at the dentist could totally turn off sensitivity and even throbbing pain? That it could allow you to sit in comfort while a dentist painlessly repairs a tooth that’s been hurting you?

You shouldn’t feel like you are panicked, shaking, sweating, nauseous, or like your heart is pounding when you get a needle. If you experience any of that it is anxiety and far worse than the needle itself. I used to experience that and each time it was simply better. My brain simply turned down the volume and eventually flipped the off switch on this irrational fear.

Now, my attitude is “whatever.” I feel like it is somebody else getting the shot in that I am somehow detached and just don’t care. Nurses will say something like, “be sure to move it after and take Tylenol or Advil if you need it.” I respond, it doesn’t hurt now, it won’t hurt after and if it does I won’t care. That attitude must work because I never experience any pain. I am talking on my phone while getting a flu shot.

I had a nurse tell me that in a refresher course they told them it is less painful to give vaccines 5 seconds per tenth of a ml, but then it would take 25 seconds to give a flu shot... that they usually give them fast. I was there for two, a flu and a tetanus, so I suggested she try it both ways doing one fast and one slow that I would let her know. Afterwards, I told her it is inconclusive in that neither one hurt. That the volume is so small at half a ml each that both were painless... that I have no preference but maybe slow is better for someone with a small underdeveloped or emancipated arm otherwise very likely faster is better in that some folks are going to be freaked out to have a needle in them for 20 seconds.
 
M

MountainMama

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Jul 1, 2018
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I used to have a terrible needle phobia, especially with dental injections. My childhood dentist wasn’t the best at giving shots and I still cringe remembering some of those. Even now, I ask for nitrous if I can get it when I have to have injections. I am going in next week to get my implants uncovered. It is a simple procedure and will be quick, but I am opting for nitrous mostly because of the injections, especially the palate shot in the front. I still have to shut my eyes and breathe deeply to get through it.
 
N

NETWizz

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May 15, 2013
Messages
102
I had one prior dentist who wasn’t the best. He was ex-millitsty and always in a rush. He used to block both sides at the same time. I literally had two syringes in crossing over one another. When he would do shots in the gums he was so quick he would pull out before being finished and it would still be spraying. It would leave a small lump, and if I asked about it he would say “rub it.” Somehow everything still turned out okay.
 
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