Is this infection after tooth extraction dangerous ? Please help :(

Milla85

Milla85

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Oct 13, 2021
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Snog cluinntinn bhuat :)

I'm sorry my photo made you cry.
Yes, I'm Scottish, I live in the western Highlands, just north of Glen Coe, that view is looking across Loch Linnhe towards Appin.

This is most emphatically not a US forum, but we're a very cosmopolitan lot here.

Righto, back to your mouth.
1) The stuff you're looking for from the pharmacy is something like "Build Up" a nice mix of proteins and vitamins to give you a little bit of a calorie boost.

2) It's not crazy the way it's healing up. It's normal... apologies if this is too technical (or too simple for that matter).

Tissues heal in 2 ways, by primary intention and by secondary intention. In primary intention, the outer layer of cells in the body (epithelium) grow fast and converge across the defect on a bed of the lower layer of cells, (connective tissue). This happens when for example you have a clean slice with a knife blade or when the 2 parts of the wound are drawn together with stitches.

In a dental extraction, normally the 2 halves of the wound can't really be brought together, so you have healing by secondary intention. What happens there is that connective tissue cells start to reproduce and fill up the defect, then the epithelial cells come across to finish the job. The connective tissue covers itself with a layer called granulation tissue which keeps sh*t out amongst other things. The granulation tissue starts to bring in bone cells and stuff to rebuild the base of the hole, but that takes a while. Meanwhile the fast growing epithelia has covered the defect.

If you add in the complication in your case of there being a slight issue with connective tissue, then the hole is going to take longer to fill in, but the epithelium will proceed as usual.

3) IF they had to go back in and get that root tip, then you wouldn't remove "meat" from the palate to close the hole, you'd move a layer of the skin across like a blanket and stitch it down round the edges, personally I would put in some bone graft material to help close the defect up faster given your medical history. This is not nearly as bad as it sounds and would heal by primary intention (see above) which means your medical issues won't be a factor. But that's only IF they had to go back in and IF the root tip was so close to the sinus that it was a factor. On your x-ray it doesn't look like it. I very much doubt if you'd lose another tooth either, he's probably just giving you worst case options.

Hope this helps and no tears this time!
My Glencoe search
Result was mind blowing, so beautiful! (screenshot attached) ☺️

Well somehow I wish you were my surgeon, because you try to explain me what is is going on and the possible outcomes. My surgeon said zero to me, except that it was a pretty difficult surgery and that he didn’t expect that would take so long 😒
I saw a very known specialist here in Paris before going to my surgeon, and he said that there was almost no bone between both teeth according to the scan was made, so he would put a “support” to help the grow. In the end I didn’t go to him because of “logistics”, and he referred me to this surgeon as being a good one.
Well well, I am not sure what to say, as patience is hard to judge someone’s job, since I don’t know the difficulties he found before him, so I not judge until I know it better, but I feel his ego made him think that he don’t need any special procedure to a tooth that from the beginning was known to be difficult, on patience with a connective tissues disorder.
Aaanyway 😅
The part of the visible hole feels electric amd clearly no bone behind yet, but although is sensitive doesn’t hurt. What bothers me is the hidden parte where it hurts behind the gum and underneath the nose, like inflamed.
have you seen this in a patience after 1 month and one week? It’s so weird , I feel like an alien not talking to people in the house for so long because the tongue touches exactly the area .
Can I “inflamed” feeling still be part of the slow healing process, or do you thing that is most definitely the stoped root that has to come out ?

I promise this was my last question. Jesus!

Taing airson do chuid foighidinn 😅
 

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Gordon

Gordon

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Only some of those photos are in Glen Coe :) It is a nice place to visit, despite the horrible history attached to it.

We're heading round to the lochan with the dogs this afternoon, interesting story behind that one if you google it. If you can imagine a big, daft, blonde dog swimming about then you'll be about right.

Glencoe3_d3f7811b3660c65972079509c24d235f_800.jpg
 
Gordon

Gordon

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Anyway, back to the less fun stuff, dentistry. Some surgeons have excellent technical skills but terrible people skills, to be honest, I'm probably the opposite.
I think the "support" your first guy was talking about would've been a bit of bone graft material, it might have made healing a bit quicker.

I don't think that 5 weeks or so is a particularly long time for this to be healing up, it was potentially a very big boney defect and bone takes ages to regrow. It's easy enough for me to say, but try not to stress too much over it.
 
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