maryland bridge info please

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scifiemz

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ive been told about maryland bridges,( as i need one tooth replacing). i was offered a bridge but from what i could understand they wanted to take the top off my neighboring tooth in order to fix it. This sounds a lot kinder and less intrusive. is it? do all dentists offer this(NHS)? and the big one. do they need to numb you to fix it? I wont go to the dentist due to a intense needle phobia.
many thanks
 
Gordon

Gordon

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Yes it's less intrusive but it doesn't suit every situation.
Yes the NHS should offer it, even the messed up English system, but not all NHS dentists will offer to do it.
No you don't normally need local to fit it.
 
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scifiemz

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Yes it's less intrusive but it doesn't suit every situation.
Yes the NHS should offer it, even the messed up English system, but not all NHS dentists will offer to do it.
No you don't normally need local to fit it.
okay , that's good , brilliant even , now just to get the nerves to contact my dentist and ask about it , the receptionist isn't exactly friendly .
i can't really afford it , but do all privet dentists offer this?
many thanks for your wonderful help x
 
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scifiemz

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could you tell the reasons that i may be refused it please? thank you
 
Gordon

Gordon

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Mainly financial, the NHS fee for it isn't great, if for any reason it doesn't fit or the shade is wrong then remaking it will cost the dentist more than they'll get off the NHS for the whole job.
Some dentists will accept the risk as "swings and roundabouts" others won't.
 
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scifiemz

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Mainly financial, the NHS fee for it isn't great, if for any reason it doesn't fit or the shade is wrong then remaking it will cost the dentist more than they'll get off the NHS for the whole job.
Some dentists will accept the risk as "swings and roundabouts" others won't.

is that why it '' it doesn't suit every situation .''
thank you x
 
Gordon

Gordon

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No, I meant that was why not every NHS dentist would offer one.
In terms of clinical stuff, it depends on (amongst other things)
1) Which tooth it is, big molars are usually not suitable
2) What the condition of the neighbouring teeth are like
3) What the bite is like
4) What the oral hygiene is like (they take some maintenance above the usual brushing/flossing)
5) Any parafunctional habits (nail biting, opening hair clips, that kind of stuff)
 
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scifiemz

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No, I meant that was why not every NHS dentist would offer one.
In terms of clinical stuff, it depends on (amongst other things)
1) Which tooth it is, big molars are usually not suitable
2) What the condition of the neighbouring teeth are like
3) What the bite is like
4) What the oral hygiene is like (they take some maintenance above the usual brushing/flossing)
5) Any parafunctional habits (nail biting, opening hair clips, that kind of stuff)
i think the only thing that may a issue is which tooth. its the one next to my canine tooth going backwards on the top.
 
Gordon

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That would be fine, as long as the canine is healthy. You'd use the canine for the "wing" that holds on the bridge.
 
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