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More implant PANIC that only a dentist can answer what about MRSA and other acquired infections

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ScaredMAB

Junior member
Joined
Aug 3, 2017
Messages
14
More implant PANIC that only a dentist can answer what about MRSA and other acquired infections

Yes, I do lay awake at night and think of dental things to worry about. My restoration is going pretty well, but as we get close to being ready to do the implants my mind is racing.

I know there are specific procedures for cleaning the room between patients, etc. However, with the implant procedure, drilling into bone..... are there any stats on the transmission of MRSA to the patient?

While I know I need to go forward with this if I am going to EAT, I am very worried that unless I sit there and watch them clean the room to my standard that I could end up dying from some dreadful infection. (I know--crazy) :o

Do any of you have some information to share, or at least some calming words?
 
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Rosie1994

Junior member
Joined
Oct 25, 2017
Messages
4
Advice from a nurse who assists implant surgery

Hello,

I'm new to this forum and I know it says on the title of your post that only a dentist can answer; but I hope what I write can help put your mind at ease.

I'm a dental nurse. Cleaning the surgery between patients is SOLELY the responsibility of the nurse and only the nurse. Every nurse is trained to the gold standard of cleaning every surface, and all equipment in such a routine that even if the dentist nor patient didn't have contact with them directly, they are still disinfected because of bacteria in the air and from various other forms of harmless bacteria.

During nurses training (I'm not sure about old school nurses who are in their 40s-50s) these days we have to learn thoroughly about all the different names of bacteria, fungi, spores etc living in various places in the human body or how they are contracted and how to disinfect/sterilise/kill these.

As a dental care professional, our governing body (the GDC) makes sure even years after we learn and have qualified, that our knowledge and skills continue to develop. Prevention of cross-infection is what we stand by, what we practice, what we will continue to learn as the science develops.

I work once a week with the implant dentist. As it is classed as a surgical procedure different methods are used for setting up the dental surgery - as you said, it involves contact with bone etc. The aim is to achieve asepsis in the surgery. Most equipment (the equipment in contact with the dentist's hands thus in contact with you) will be thoroughly disinfected and covered before your surgery. Instruments are sterilised using a heated autoclave killing all germs and most of the smaller instruments (the part that touches your bone) are single-use; a new one for every patient and disposed immediately afterwards.

The dentist and their assisting nurses will perform a surgical aseptic handwash before your surgery.

As a nurse we are monitored closely with random observations and assessments. If our work to prevent cross-infection fails to meet standards set by our governing body (e.g. Leaving blood on something) then the matter is taken very seriously with the public's Health as priority - we would get struck off the register and never able to practice again just like a teacher or an occupation with a similar governing body.

I really hope at least some of this puts your mind at rest - be open and honest with your dentist about your phobias and I'm certain they will work with and not against you whilst you tackle them. An experience at the dentist is not supposed to feel forced; be certain in your treatment and be certain in your dentist. If you don't feel confident in them, find another one.

Best of luck with your journey,
Rosie
 
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ScaredMAB

Junior member
Joined
Aug 3, 2017
Messages
14
Re: More implant PANIC that only a dentist can answer what about MRSA and other acquired infections

Thank you so much Rosie, this is very informative. I appreciate very much your taking the time to prepare this answer.

I am trying very hard not to be totally freaked out, my dentist has been very patient as I move through one fear to the next.

I have researched the topic of MRSA and infections in dental implant placement but have not been very successful in finding any good info. So that is why I thought I could only get info from a dentist. But I was wrong, you have been very helpful.

One more question, have you ever heard on someone getting MRSA from Implant placement? I assume it is not common?

Thanks again!!!!!
 
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Rosie1994

Junior member
Joined
Oct 25, 2017
Messages
4
Re: More implant PANIC that only a dentist can answer what about MRSA and other acquired infections

Thank you so much Rosie, this is very informative. I appreciate very much your taking the time to prepare this answer.

I am trying very hard not to be totally freaked out, my dentist has been very patient as I move through one fear to the next.

I have researched the topic of MRSA and infections in dental implant placement but have not been very successful in finding any good info. So that is why I thought I could only get info from a dentist. But I was wrong, you have been very helpful.

One more question, have you ever heard on someone getting MRSA from Implant placement? I assume it is not common?

Thanks again!!!!!
Hi, its no problem at all. I love my career and it's common to calm patients for these types of procedures. If you were going to hospital to have knee surgery for example I'm sure you'd be worried about that! So don't feel like any of your questions to your dentist are a hinderance, take as much time as you need. You could even make an appointment beforehand with your dentist just for a discussion of any other questions you have before the big day so you can properly prepare your mind. (I say the big day, but depending on the amount of implants placed you'll probably be in and out within an hour or two)

I've tried to have a look online for statistics and, like you, I can't find a great deal.

I did find this.. "The transmission of MRSA in the dental setting is a possibility, though there have been very few documented cases. An example of the possibility is the documented transmission of MRSA from a British dental practitioner to patients.3 The two patients were seen within three weeks of each other, and both developed the same type of MRSA. The dentist had the same MRSA isolated from his fingernails. He did not wear gloves. He had undergone emergency surgery prior to the events, at a hospital that was dealing with an outbreak of MRSA. The dentist received treatment for the disease, and infection control was increased in his dental setting, including the use of gloves and handwashing. At an evaluation of his office setting nine weeks later, no MRSA was detected."

...It doesn't have a date of the activity, but I can assure you dentists cannot and do not practice without gloves these days for everybodies safety! So I would've thought that was a long time ago, and as previously noted, standards and protocols change all the time and we are so closely monitored that simply nobody would be able to get away with something that unhygienic.

Come to think of it, the MRSA pathogens were present under the clinician's fingernails. So if you wanted to REALLY break it down; that risk is eliminated 3 times over. By the barrier of gloves, by the thorough disinfection of all equipment and single-use instruments that have direct contact with your bone/gums, and by the hand washing techniques we use. It might be useful for you to look up a clinical handwash and a surgical or aseptic handwash- both are mandatory and part of our routine.

The same article, referring to the bacteria present in MRSA/MSSA later concludes "One study showed a shocking rate of the pathogen on a treasure chest for prizes in a pediatric clinic. Simply cleaning the box with a household cleaner eliminated the risk."

I'd like to remind you also, that, one of the rules that we as dental nurses stand by is to "treat everybody as clinically infectious". We treat patients every day with blood-borne viruses such as HIV, Hepatitis etc. We eliminate that cross-contamination risk by following this rule because not everybody is going to disclose that they are infectious. It cannot be one rule for some and different for another; if we reset the surgery exactly the same after each patient and strive to increase the amount of single-use items or autoclavable items, wether they have disclosed an infectious condition, wether they are carrying it in secret, or they may not be infectious at all, then all risk is eliminated!

Please let me know if there is anything else I can help you with. The thought of implants (especially if you like to scare yourself and read about the procedure beforehand!) is very daunting. speak to your support group, friends, family and colleagues. Talk about it, let your mind become used to the idea. Hopefully when it's all through and you have a new lease of life, you'll wonder what all the worry was for. :)

Best wishes,
Rosie
 
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Rosie1994

Junior member
Joined
Oct 25, 2017
Messages
4
Re: More implant PANIC that only a dentist can answer what about MRSA and other acquired infections

I forgot to add. Myself, I've never heard of that happening during my time assisting in implant placement and maintenance. :)
 
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ScaredMAB

Junior member
Joined
Aug 3, 2017
Messages
14
Re: More implant PANIC that only a dentist can answer what about MRSA and other acquired infections

Thanks again Rosie. I am sure this post will help a number of people on this site. Not just implant patients, but all of us.

I appreciate it so much.
 
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