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My partner is terrified

R

redjo123

Junior member
Joined
Nov 4, 2010
Messages
3
My partner finally went to the dentist after over 10 years of being terrified of going, He also has a phobia of needles.

He needs root canal on one tooth which also has an absess. He also needs the roots taken away from his wisdom teeth which have shattered and a filling.

The dentist is referring him to a sedation clinic, Which he doesnt like that sound off as he says if he has sedation he will be out of it and will not have control of the situation. The dentist said it would be good to get all the treatment done in one go which i think will be a bad idea as he will be in the chair for a long time.

He is so scared of going his whole body shakes and if he feels out of control he may lash out or run. he says he will be up and down from the chair.

I have no phobias and have no idea how i can help him or what to suggest. Does anyone have any ideas of the best way to get the treatment done ?

I thankyou in advance
Jo
 
R

Redfield

Member
Joined
Nov 4, 2010
Messages
20
I had 2 teeth pulled a few years ago under IV sedation. At first I didn't think the sedation was having any affect other than me feeling ever so slightly calmer. The dentist started the work, I remember the injections and then the dentist asking if I was OK. The first tooth had been removed and I hadn't noticed anything, yet I still felt fairly compos mentis. The dentist then explained that the next tooth would be a little more difficult as it was snapped to just below the gum. I opened my mouth for what seemed like a few seconds when the dentist told me to rinse. Job done.

The sedation, for me, was strange but I didn't feel out of control at any point. It's easy for me to say but tell him to go for it, I think he'll be pleasantly surprised. :D
 
brit

brit

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Mar 23, 2006
Messages
6,958
Location
In My Dental Happy Place
He is so scared of going his whole body shakes and if he feels out of control he may lash out or run. he says he will be up and down from the chair.
This is exactly the kind of reaction, sedation is supposed to overcome. He has two choices:
1. find a dentist he likes and trusts who will work at his pace and treat him (painlessly) with just local anaesthetic/oral sedation - (this has the benefit that you find a dentist you can stick with and 'overcome' the phobia but if NHS no guarantees the dentist will stay)
2. Be i/v sedated which is what is being recommended and get all work done in one fell swoop with minimal stress to both parties.

Only he can decide - if he wishes to take the first approach, it can be very time-consuming and is more easily found in the private dentistry sector in the UK.

Or you could have a mixed approach, be sedated for the unpleasant stuff and be awake for the simpler stuff.
If you are talking UK NHS sedation, make very sure that they will do the different work options - sometimes the sedation is just available for extractions and it would be a crying shame to get teeth which could otherwise be saved extracted just because of dental fear.
When you say you have no phobia yourself, have you had much dental treatment, can you reassure him from your own positive experiences?

If his main concern is needle phobia, a dentist with The Wand or who otherwise claims to have a comfortable technique is the best way forward (if not sedation) - dental injections do not have to be painful but not all dentists use the slow techniques to make them pain-free.

Read the Common Dental Fears section, it will quickly turn you into an expert on the subject.
 
R

redjo123

Junior member
Joined
Nov 4, 2010
Messages
3
I had 2 teeth pulled a few years ago under IV sedation. At first I didn't think the sedation was having any affect other than me feeling ever so slightly calmer. The dentist started the work, I remember the injections and then the dentist asking if I was OK. The first tooth had been removed and I hadn't noticed anything, yet I still felt fairly compos mentis. The dentist then explained that the next tooth would be a little more difficult as it was snapped to just below the gum. I opened my mouth for what seemed like a few seconds when the dentist told me to rinse. Job done.

The sedation, for me, was strange but I didn't feel out of control at any point. It's easy for me to say but tell him to go for it, I think he'll be pleasantly surprised. :D
thankyou for your advice x :respect:
 
R

redjo123

Junior member
Joined
Nov 4, 2010
Messages
3
This is exactly the kind of reaction, sedation is supposed to overcome. He has two choices:
1. find a dentist he likes and trusts who will work at his pace and treat him (painlessly) with just local anaesthetic/oral sedation - (this has the benefit that you find a dentist you can stick with and 'overcome' the phobia but if NHS no guarantees the dentist will stay)
2. Be i/v sedated which is what is being recommended and get all work done in one fell swoop with minimal stress to both parties.

Only he can decide - if he wishes to take the first approach, it can be very time-consuming and is more easily found in the private dentistry sector in the UK.

Or you could have a mixed approach, be sedated for the unpleasant stuff and be awake for the simpler stuff.
If you are talking UK NHS sedation, make very sure that they will do the different work options - sometimes the sedation is just available for extractions and it would be a crying shame to get teeth which could otherwise be saved extracted just because of dental fear.
When you say you have no phobia yourself, have you had much dental treatment, can you reassure him from your own positive experiences?

If his main concern is needle phobia, a dentist with TheWand or who otherwise claims to having a comfortable technique is best way forward (if not sedation) - dental injections do not have to be painful but not all dentists use the slow techniques to make them painfree.

Read the Common Fears section, it will quickly turn you into an expert on the subject.
Thanks i will have a read of the common fears section hopefully i can larn alot

:respect:
 
Dr. Daniel

Dr. Daniel

Well-known member
Verified dentist
Joined
Nov 2, 2010
Messages
1,952
Location
The Hague , Holland
Hey redjo
Your partner needs first of all your love and support. It is proven in research that social support, especially from confidants. It helps them to buffer the fear.
You do not need to do anything, just be there, lving and supportive.

There are also specialist who deal with pecific phobias (like needle phobia) and they can surely help with the dental phobia as well.

good luck:cloud9:
 
TerrifiedWoman

TerrifiedWoman

Well-known member
Joined
May 13, 2010
Messages
843
Location
Iowa, USA
IV sedation is THE BEST. Had it in July. I'm also needle phobic..but the nurse that did my IV was so good I didn't even feel it.
The fear beforehand is FAR worse than getting the work done..I promise!
 
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