Nervous about Cracked Teeth

C

Chloe06

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Jul 8, 2021
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16
Hi everyone!
So I am definitely embarrassed to say that I have not been to the dentist in about 20 years. I was always the type of person who figured that as long I was cleaning my teeth at home that I did not need to go to one. Yikes!

So about a year ago, I had one of my back teeth crack off, but I still never have felt any pain, so I decided I didn't need to go and just started chewing on the opposite side. Now that tooth is loose...Jesus, deliver me.

Also, about a month ago, I was eating a piece of Laffy Taffy, and the candy caused a split down the middle of a back tooth on the opposite side! Now I realize I definitely need to get things taken care of.

I called a dentist yesterday to make an appointment for Monday. I do not have any pain at all with either tooth, but I am so scared that they are going to have the remove the teeth and implant new ones or put crowns on the teeth. What type of pain can I expect after? How long will I be in pain? Will the teeth feel always feel strange?

I just need some comfort please from those of you who have been in my position!
 
Dr. Daniel

Dr. Daniel

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Verified dentist
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2,010
Hi,

The fact that the tooth is not hurting is good because there is no urgency in real treatment, most certainly no need to immediately extract anything.
furthermore, since you don’t have to get treatment as soon as possible, in case it does not click with the dentist you are about to meet or if you want to have a second opinion, you can easily do so. You are in a position to choose when, how and by whom get dental treatment.
the biggest challenge in your case is sitting in the dental chair: it might be all new and even frightening. It is very important thatyou tel that to the dentist so that they can patiently examine you and explain things. Please don’t rush to leave the dental practice. You need to invest time in order to make that visit a positive experience.
I have made a video which might be relevant to you:
Stating your needs to the dentist
Hope it helps.
 
C

Chloe06

Junior member
Joined
Jul 8, 2021
Messages
16
I do not have any pain, but I also have not really been chewing on that side. However, if I press down on the tooth or when I brush the tooth, I do not have pain. Is that promising?


Hi,

The fact that the tooth is not hurting is good because there is no urgency in real treatment, most certainly no need to immediately extract anything.
furthermore, since you don’t have to get treatment as soon as possible, in case it does not click with the dentist you are about to meet or if you want to have a second opinion, you can easily do so. You are in a position to choose when, how and by whom get dental treatment.
the biggest challenge in your case is sitting in the dental chair: it might be all new and even frightening. It is very important thatyou tel that to the dentist so that they can patiently examine you and explain things. Please don’t rush to leave the dental practice. You need to invest time in order to make that visit a positive experience.
I have made a video which might be relevant to you:
Stating your needs to the dentist
Hope it helps.
 
Dr. Daniel

Dr. Daniel

Well-known member
Verified dentist
Joined
Nov 2, 2010
Messages
2,010
I do not have any pain, but I also have not really been chewing on that side. However, if I press down on the tooth or when I brush the tooth, I do not have pain. Is that promising?
It’s a good sign
 
M

MountainMama

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Messages
2,488
I broke a large piece off an upper 2nd molar in my early 30’s. I always had gone to the dentist, had regular cleanings and great dental hygiene. It can happen to anyone. My dentist at the time just put in a large filling. Several years later, a different dentist told me I should have had it crowned right away and put a crown on it. I had a lot of issues with that tooth due to not getting it crowned when I should have. The process for getting a crown is not too awful, just time consuming. You shouldn’t have to lose the tooth, especially if it isn’t hurting. The only teeth I have had extracted were ones that were in enough pain that I was ready for them to come out!
 
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Chloe06

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Thank y'all so much for your information. I am trying to stay positive since I do not have pain currently in either tooth. I will see what the dentist says on Monday!
 
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Chloe06

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How long can I expect to not eat solid food if I do have to get a crown or extraction?
 
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champ

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I don't know that there were any restrictions on eating after a crown. Certainly not more than a couple of hours, if there weren't any. I haven't had extractions but I know people who have, and I think they eat soft food for a week or two.
 
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Chloe06

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Messages
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Are they usually able to place a crown within the same day as running xrays to detect the problem? If so, how long is the process?
 
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champ

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There are new processes now by which I think they can do a same-day crown. They didn't have those when I was getting mine. It was a 2-3 week wait. But there's a machine now called a CEREK, I think, that some dentists have so they can do crowns right away. The dentists here will know much more than I do.
 
letsconnect

letsconnect

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As champ said, you can eat solid food once the numbing has worn off after a crown. After an extraction, you’d probably want to wait until the next day at least , unless you’re like @Enarete who ate pizza the same night 😅. A lot depends on how difficult the extraction is (ask your dentist!).

With crowns, Cerec would allow same-day placement of the final crown, or with conventional crowns, you’d get a temporary one first for a week or two while waiting for the lab to make the final crown. You can still eat with the temp crown - just don’t chew anything too hard on it.
 
Enarete

Enarete

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After an extraction, you’d probably want to wait until the next day at least , unless you’re like @Enarete who ate pizza the same night 😅.

Yeah, ignorance is bliss. I did zero research back then and it just haven’t occured to me that I should be eating any differently!:grin:

For temp crowns I would also avoid gummy bears and candies that are sticky. Those are not the best idea with permanent crowns either.
 
letsconnect

letsconnect

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For temp crowns I would also avoid gummy bears and candies that are sticky. Those are not the best idea with permanent crowns either.

Is that still the case with modern bonding materials? I would have thought that anything goes. Might be a question for our dentists! Mind you, gummy bears (unless they're sugar-free) and sticky candy are not exactly known for their oral health benefits, crowns or no crowns 😛
 
Enarete

Enarete

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Is that still the case with modern bonding materials? I would have thought that anything goes. Might be a question for our dentists! Mind you, gummy bears (unless they're sugar-free) and sticky candy are not exactly known for their oral health benefits, crowns or no crowns 😛

Good points. My post was based on memories of people coming in with crowns that got lose and yes, those cases were older crowns, so it may be not up to date anymore. Good idea to ask our dentists in case anyone really loves those things. I’m more into chocolate and cookies (and I eat them very quickly to minimize the damage of course :innocent:)
 

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