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NICE guidance on wizzie removal question

A

annie778

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Gordon

Gordon

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The NICE guidance is relatively recent and is UK centric, US dentists are far more keen to remove wizzies early than in the UK and as I said, the guidance is quite recent, not that I'm saying it was a while ago that you were 25 or anything... edges behind the sofa.
 
Gordon

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Yes, but bear in mind the operative word is GUIDANCE, like all things related to human beings, there are no hard and fast rules here.

The guidelines are pretty much consistent to what I was taught back in Glasgow in 1980, so they aren't really that radical.
 
brit

brit

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Yes, but bear in mind the operative word is GUIDANCE, like all things related to human beings, there are no hard and fast rules here.

The guidelines are pretty much consistent to what I was taught back in Glasgow in 1980, so they aren't really that radical.
Yes I think my NHS extractions in the 1980s would have still fallen into those categories.
You can't help thinking many USA dentists are simply about maximising profit regardless of clinical need/appropriateness.

Not that I agree with everything NICE comes out with mind you...e.g. healozone.
 
Zzzdentist

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Those guidelines are nice :rolleyes:, but they don't seem to mention wisdom teeth that have the potential to create problems like creating periodontal defects, resorbing adjacent teeth (rare), and becoming impacted / infected. Sometimes you will see a "healthy" wisdom tooth coming in, but it's obviously going to create problems sooner or later especially when there is no room for it in the arch. Just because it's healthy doesn't mean that it won't create problems.

Say you have an healthy extra arm growing out of your back. Sure it's nice and healthy and probably handy to scratch those nether regions, but the potential problems it can create with posture, sleeping position, and general social interaction miiiight warrant it's removal. I don't know.

Personally I wouldn't mind an extra hand during some dental procedures, but then again that might freak some patients out to see that back hand reaching up and about handing my other two hands instruments. :whistle: It would make dates in dark theatres interesting though... "Hey I swear! It wasn't me touching you there!" :innocent:
 
brit

brit

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Those guidelines are nice :rolleyes:, but they don't seem to mention wisdom teeth that have the potential to create problems like creating periodontal defects, resorbing adjacent teeth (rare), and becoming impacted / infected. Sometimes you will see a "healthy" wisdom tooth coming in, but it's obviously going to create problems sooner or later especially when there is no room for it in the arch. Just because it's healthy doesn't mean that it won't create problems.
:innocent:
I think you could put the example where there is obviously insufficient room under: 'Only patients who have diseased wisdom teeth, or other problems with their mouth, should have their wisdom teeth removed.'
I>E> lack of room is 'another problem' but clearly the spirit is to not intervene unnecessarily....'do no harm' and all that.
They are just guidelines..it is still up to the oral surgeon to do what he feels is clinically appropriate in each case. Mine left 1 out of 4 in...I'm sure in USA I would have lost all four, particularly as I was of a 'get them all out now' frame of mind at the time..glad I've still got it now.
Wasn't getting at you ZZZ, I said US not Canada ;).
 
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