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Options for replacing missing tooth?

F

fizzy

Member
Joined
Nov 2, 2006
Messages
37
i have 3 teeth missing in all but i have one that can be seen quite clear when i smile, hence the reason i dont much, what can be done to fill that missing tooth? and how would the dentist do it.


thanks fizzy.
 
P

Parsnip

Well-known member
Verified dentist
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Jan 3, 2006
Messages
301
Location
Kent
Re: filling the gap?

Hi!

Couple of different options really..

1 - Leave the gap. (not much of an option I know) but some peeps are happy with that. If its stopping you smiling though, lets think of something else...

2 - denture - ie a false tooth that you can take out as you wish. Handy to clean under it (Note to denture wearers - please clean under your dentures...) They come in several different forms, but mainly, plastic based (resting on the gums) or metal based (not as bulky as the plastic (resin) based dentures, but more expensive and not ideal for certain situations - eg recent extractions) The literal translation of the Swedish phrase for dentures (sorry, I can't remember the original Swedish...) is "Loose teeth". So true - a denture has only about the 20% the biting force of a natural tooth. Not great.

3 - A bridge - providing the foundations of the adjacent teeth are good, and their angulation is favourable (ie reasonably parallel) then the teeth can be used to provide a permanent fixed false tooth. Usually the teeth either side of the gap are prepared as if to accept crowns (filed down to some extent) and then the crowns are fitted with a joining false tooth between them. Works very well, several types available, from minimally invasive to full crown fittings. Maybe not ideal if the teeth either side of the gap are perfectly sound - in whch case you might leave them alone and think about option 4.

4 - Implant - a metal (usually titanium) 'rod' is placed within the bone under the gum where the tooth is missing. (providing the bone available for placement is good, angulation favourable, you keep the rest of your teeth scruplously clean, never smoke...etc etc...) and then the 'missing' tooth (ie false crown) is screwed or cemented over the rod. This has the advantage that the teeth either side of the gap are not touched. Sometimes they can be affected by the implant placement though - don't quote me on this - I'm not a specialist, and i would only have an implant placed in my mouth BY a specialist. Just in case.

The cost of treatment increases from options one to four, so that may be a factor. Sometimes a denture will be placed as an interim measure. Bear in mind I have not seen your teeth, and not all options may be suitable for you.

Maybe Gordon can shed some more light on the implant option? Or anything else I've forgotten.. it is late/early after all.

Hope that helps.

Pars :)
 
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Gordon

Gordon

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Oct 25, 2005
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6,201
Re: filling the gap?

Nope, I think you've covered everything.
 
F

fizzy

Member
Joined
Nov 2, 2006
Messages
37
Re: filling the gap?

thankyou pars for that, theres quite a few solutions there, thankyou.



fizzy xx
 
T

toothlessish

Member
Joined
Oct 20, 2006
Messages
61
Re: filling the gap?

Ok I'm going to but in here probably shouldn't but hey I like living dangerously!

When you talk about minimaly invasive do you mean the 'sticktec' bridge. It's advantages are that it doesn't necessarily involve damaging the teeth on either side (depending on biting force I think), I have one that fills a gap it was performed in the chair in less than an hour with no pain drilling or other nasty surprises. It's cheap (ish) quick and doesn't damage the tooth (just the painting on of some sort of acid etching liquid to roughen the surface). Mine is only 'glued' onto one tooth. It's been in place for 5yrs and is still secure and fine, but it isn't a very bitey tooth. I do know someone who had one as a big bitey tooth and it wasn't as sucessful. I'm talking about it because (at least when I had mine) finding a dentist who did them was quite difficult in the UK anyway. If it's just to fill a gap I really think it's a very good option and just so not horrid to have done :)
 
P

Parsnip

Well-known member
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Jan 3, 2006
Messages
301
Location
Kent
Re: filling the gap?

Good for you!

Never heard of sticktech - will look them up. Often though, quick fix solutions... hmm, will reserve judgement - it's lasted you well enough. Let me get back to you on this :D
 
P

Parsnip

Well-known member
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Jan 3, 2006
Messages
301
Location
Kent
Re: filling the gap?

Yeah - that's driving me mad today!

Thanks for the links!

:D
 
letsconnect

letsconnect

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5,083
Re: filling the gap?

Maryland bridge might be worth a mention as well depending on which tooth is missing... is that similar to sticktech?
 
P

Parsnip

Well-known member
Verified dentist
Joined
Jan 3, 2006
Messages
301
Location
Kent
Re: filling the gap?

Sorry, should have been more specific in my answer - By 'miminally invasive' I meant the likes of maryland bridges. I'm intrigued by these sticktech doo-dahs though. Metal free - now that's more like it! Am considering one for a patient of mine now. Thanks Toothlessish!

:D
 
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