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Paediatric dentists for phobics?

S

Surreyvwphobic

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I just wanted to share this idea which although seems so ridiculously obvious, was the key to my success and will doubtless help others. Put simply, when searching for a practice that might help with phobia, also look and (and ask) for details or to speak with the dentist(s) that are especially good with children; chances are that if they can help and pacify a yelling toddler, they can surely calm a blubbering 50 year old! The only pitfall to watch for down this route is that you do not find someone patronising with this, but I found this approach to work very well. I have not so far plugged the practice that gave me this simple bit of advice, but will now do so; they are called Cavendish House and are somewhere just outside Cambridge but I do not have details to hand at present, but will happily post them when found. I was so touched by their honesty when I contacted them during my search, as they indicated that they are quite a large practice and very busy, and could genuinely not offer the time patience and care that they said I very much needed and deserved. Bless them! A lovely young lady called Clare gave me the suggestion of hunting out the paediatric specialists of any practice. In my case, it was the perfect solution!

Hope this is of use to anybody and happy to pass on details and inspiration to any who ask. Simon XX:cool:
 
Enarete

Enarete

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That's a very good point, thanks for sharing. Reminds me of the fact that the tell-show-do technique was originally developed for children but is the basis of dealing with nervous adults too (if not even a basis of informed consent when I think of it deeply..) https://www.dentalfearcentral.org/help/psychology/tell-show-do/ (I just love the articles here on the site and use every ocasion to post a link:redface:)
So looking for a paediatric dentist makes a lot of sense.. just imagining the point when the receptionist asks how old your child is and you say that the appt is meant to be for you. :giggle:
 
krlovesherkids777

krlovesherkids777

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Just a thought.

So .. thinking about pediatric dentistry.. brings me to not so lovely thoughts of an awful experience of my daughter when she was 3 and it was her first time. I was excited it would be a child focused pediatric dentist that surely they would be better than the experience I had as a child.. well.. they had a different philosophy... so all pediatric dentists are not alike.. this one specific looked very sweet in her picture even young pretty smiling.. well... then my daughter was scared it was her first time.. they were rushing her which made it more scary (was at the end of day , which I don't recommend if first time) anyways. they told me. maybe if you go in the waiting room she will be less nervous.. then I went and in less than 5 min I heard her screaming and crying. I came into an awful scene of the dentist forcefully on top of her cleaning her teeth while the hygenist or assistant held her down crying and screaming.. I can still picture this.. I actually went throught the door and yelled STOP.. right now... STOP.. and my daughter was fully crying and scared.. the Dentist then said "If I stop now she will think she has the control and that she never has to do it and you can never come back".. well.. I told her.. who would want to...? this is a scared 3 yr old who has never been before. what does it profit to scare a child and start their dental journey in a traumatic way... ugh... so... this is the philosophy of some pediatric dentists... THANKFULLY.... my dentist at the time. let her come to some of my appts and gave her toys and was so nice to her letting her see it is not a scary thing.. and then eventually went to a new pediatric dentist that I can say was truly a blessing and very gentle and kind and said she would NeVER treat a child in such a way.. so... just a thought.. ugh.. just like many for anxious patients just want to put you under sedation and don't want to really help you deal with the anxiety and talk about the shame and past and all.. its just finding the right fit... but... it is an interesting thought and idea!! really glad it worked for you !!
 
S

Surreyvwphobic

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Joined
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Messages
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In dental heaven
Just a thought.

So .. thinking about pediatric dentistry.. brings me to not so lovely thoughts of an awful experience of my daughter when she was 3 and it was her first time. I was excited it would be a child focused pediatric dentist that surely they would be better than the experience I had as a child.. well.. they had a different philosophy... so all pediatric dentists are not alike.. this one specific looked very sweet in her picture even young pretty smiling.. well... then my daughter was scared it was her first time.. they were rushing her which made it more scary (was at the end of day , which I don't recommend if first time) anyways. they told me. maybe if you go in the waiting room she will be less nervous.. then I went and in less than 5 min I heard her screaming and crying. I came into an awful scene of the dentist forcefully on top of her cleaning her teeth while the hygenist or assistant held her down crying and screaming.. I can still picture this.. I actually went throught the door and yelled STOP.. right now... STOP.. and my daughter was fully crying and scared.. the Dentist then said "If I stop now she will think she has the control and that she never has to do it and you can never come back".. well.. I told her.. who would want to...? this is a scared 3 yr old who has never been before. what does it profit to scare a child and start their dental journey in a traumatic way... ugh... so... this is the philosophy of some pediatric dentists... THANKFULLY.... my dentist at the time. let her come to some of my appts and gave her toys and was so nice to her letting her see it is not a scary thing.. and then eventually went to a new pediatric dentist that I can say was truly a blessing and very gentle and kind and said she would NeVER treat a child in such a way.. so... just a thought.. ugh.. just like many for anxious patients just want to put you under sedation and don't want to really help you deal with the anxiety and talk about the shame and past and all.. its just finding the right fit... but... it is an interesting thought and idea!! really glad it worked for you !!
So sorry you had such a terrible experience; this should never happen to anyone, regardless of age. Obviously, learning from this, it is worth "interviewing" any prospective dentist before anything happens, which had clearly not occurred in this case. Advice is to simply look elsewhere and probably remain with your daughter for the next meeting to ensure that both she and dentist are happy with proceedings.

Good luck to both of you and keep us informed! Simon XX :)
 
krlovesherkids777

krlovesherkids777

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So sorry you had such a terrible experience; this should never happen to anyone, regardless of age. Obviously, learning from this, it is worth "interviewing" any prospective dentist before anything happens, which had clearly not occurred in this case. Advice is to simply look elsewhere and probably remain with your daughter for the next meeting to ensure that both she and dentist are happy with proceedings.

Good luck to both of you and keep us informed! Simon XX :)

Yes.. so true.. Thank you Simon.. she is now 18 and is with a good dentist.. but yes.. I so agree for kids we must make sure the dentists have same philosophy as us. This is hard to know sometimes as some say they are.. I actually went to one for my son and had a short consultation wtih her to test her out so to say and get to know her for a few minutes before I sent my son.. then he went .. and her philosophy after he started getting nervous was next time lets just give him nitrous and do what we need to. She seemed a bit impatient wtih him and told him that his worries and concerns were all in his mind and there was no reason for him to not want xrays that he was just making things difficult, I really didn't feel good after his visit, even after she seemed ok at first. My son said after his visit. well" I never want to go there again ". I"m glad he recognized as a child that he should be listened to and now he can turn it around and learn because he has a mom who validates his experience . And I know there are good dentists that do care and are validating and gentle and patient with kids and adults. Very good advice as well though not to leave the child with them if you do not fully know of trust the dentist or if the parent is not feeling a peace or comfortable.. I went against my gut with that previously because we want to trust the professionals..
 
C

comfortdentist

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In general a pediatric practice would be a good source for a proper adult oriented dentist referral.
A specialist is restricted to only performing their specialty. This doesn't include adults. Adults have adult teeth and different to treat than primary teeth. Most pediatric dentists prefer treating primary teeth and all recently trained pediatric dentists don't even see teenagers.
 
letsconnect

letsconnect

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That's another difference between the US and UK - there are very few dedicated paediatric practices in the UK. I suppose the equivalent of what Simon is talking about would be called a "family dentist" in the US.

The specialist trick can work rather well in the UK, but as comfortdentist has hinted at, it doesn't really apply in the US. For example, there are a lot of endodontists and prosthodontists and periodontists in the UK who also do general dentistry (and they don't tend to charge more than other dentists for general dentistry services). The same isn't true in the US, where the vast majority of specialists restrict their practice to their specialty only.

The specialty trick can be really useful when finding a dentist who's good with apprehensive patients. For example, have a read of this description on a webpage entitled "3 Things You Should Know About Becoming an Endodontist":

---

"You need the right personality.


Endodontists rely heavily on a steady hand and good hand-eye coordination. Being precise in procedure and comfortable under the stress of dental emergencies isn’t the only thing that endodontists need to be.


Aside from endodontic therapy, a large part of an endodontist job is to ease patient concerns. Root Canals have a bad rep. New patients coming through the door usually expect the worse. Chairside manner is essential. Your patient is having to deal with a new dentist, new dental environment and what they consider major surgery."

---

So you'll have a very good chance of finding someone with an excellent chairside manner by simply going to the British Endodontic Society's website, searching for a member in your area, and checking whether they do general dentistry as well as endodontics (thanks to Brit for discovering this neat little trick :thumbsup:). Of course, this doesn't work 100% of the time, but the chances of finding someone who's good with apprehensive patients are greatly increased.

Letters such as MFGDP (UK), MGDS RCS (Eng), FFGDP (UK), and qualifications such as Diploma or MSc in Restorative Dentistry, etc. are also good indicators that the dentist in question has a real interest in dentistry and is enthusiastic about their work.
 
Enarete

Enarete

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"You need the right personality.


Endodontists rely heavily on a steady hand and good hand-eye coordination. Being precise in procedure and comfortable under the stress of dental emergencies isn’t the only thing that endodontists need to be.


Aside from endodontic therapy, a large part of an endodontist job is to ease patient concerns. Root Canals have a bad rep. New patients coming through the door usually expect the worse. Chairside manner is essential. Your patient is having to deal with a new dentist, new dental environment and what they consider major surgery."
Wow, an article that acknowledges the psychological factor of work with patient's, that's so impressive! :jump: I know this wasn't exactly the point of this thread, but the dentist who wrote this deserves a thank you card for acknowledging the fact that patients have feelings.. you are so far with this in UK..

This is absolutely in accordance with the posts here, a lot of members have found proper support dentally and mentally in an endodontists practice after having had a bad experience at a 'normal' dentist.

Thanks for this, Brit and Letscoonect. Can't wait for the update of the How To Find the Right Dentist Section. :)
 
Last edited:
S

Surreyvwphobic

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 1, 2010
Messages
214
Location
In dental heaven
That's another difference between the US and UK - there are very few dedicated paediatric practices in the UK. I suppose the equivalent of what Simon is talking about would be called a "family dentist" in the US.

The specialist trick can work rather well in the UK, but as comfortdentist has hinted at, it doesn't really apply in the US. For example, there are a lot of endodontists and prosthodontists and periodontists in the UK who also do general dentistry (and they don't tend to charge more than other dentists for general dentistry services). The same isn't true in the US, where the vast majority of specialists restrict their practice to their specialty only.

The specialty trick can be really useful when finding a dentist who's good with apprehensive patients. For example, have a read of this description on a webpage entitled "3 Things You Should Know About Becoming an Endodontist":

---

"You need the right personality.


Endodontists rely heavily on a steady hand and good hand-eye coordination. Being precise in procedure and comfortable under the stress of dental emergencies isn’t the only thing that endodontists need to be.


Aside from endodontic therapy, a large part of an endodontist job is to ease patient concerns. Root Canals have a bad rep. New patients coming through the door usually expect the worse. Chairside manner is essential. Your patient is having to deal with a new dentist, new dental environment and what they consider major surgery."

---

So you'll have a very good chance of finding someone with an excellent chairside manner by simply going to the British Endodontic Society's website, searching for a member in your area, and checking whether they do general dentistry as well as endodontics (thanks to Brit for discovering this neat little trick :thumbsup:). Of course, this doesn't work 100% of the time, but the chances of finding someone who's good with apprehensive patients are greatly increased.

Letters such as MFGDP (UK), MGDS RCS (Eng), FFGDP (UK), and qualifications such as Diploma or MSc in Restorative Dentistry, etc. are also good indicators that the dentist in question has a real interest in dentistry and is enthusiastic about their work.
This is a fascinating one! Would not have thought of this idea, but will certainly remember this advice should this be necessary in the future. I am personally lucky that assuming I stay put in the area I now live, the two practices I use are so good that I feel I could probably go with most dentists at either of them if needed.
 
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