Root Canal: Should I go to an Endodontists or Oral Surgeon?

S

SmartDriver

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Root Canal: Should I go to an Endodontists or Oral Surgeon?

;) Thank you for this great forum, I am in need of a root canal (RC) for teeth #4. Los Angeles, CA

I went to USC school of dentistry ER and they would not do an emergency RC and referred me to an Endodontist my appointment is Jan 4, 2012. RC/filling cost is total $305, but I have to find my own place for a crown which USC quoted me $585, totaling $890. So I want to see if I can get it done sooner and shop around. :thumbsup:

So I work in a doctor’s office and a patient of ours is a dentist and I went to get a quote for a RC and he quoted me $1000 to a final price of $500 with a crown! I believe that is a bargain and he can see me Dec 14, 2011, but don't want to get bad work done and find out I still have bad work done resulting in more teeth work. My concern came about when Dr. XXX said he can ONLY drill straight, but he said the the canal loops to the left??? My guess is, does this mean he won't be able to clean out the entire RC? Possibly haven't an infection later and more money out of pocket for more teeth work? :cry:


Please make some suggestions. Thank you in advance for your inputs.:jump:
 
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decan

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Oral surgeons do not perform root canals. Go to your endodontist.
 
S

SmartDriver

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Well on yelp he is listed as an Oral Surgeon, how accurate is yelp, I don't know? Why do some general practices do root canal if they are not a specialist? For my situation where the root cancal loops to the left, would it be better off to see a specialist/endodontist?:confused:
Thanks for your advices.
 
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decan

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Well on yelp he is listed as an Oral Surgeon, how accurate is yelp, I don't know? Why do some general practices do root canal if they are not a specialist? For my situation where the root cancal loops to the left, would it be better off to see a specialist/endodontist?:confused:
Thanks for your advices.

Every general dentist is trained in dental school to do root canals. After graduation some dentists continue on to specialize in endodontics and are trained to handle more complicated cases. As for seeing a specialist or not, its tough to say. Your dentist may have taken a lot of continuing education courses in endodontics and may be suited to handle the procedure. If your dentist is not comfortable in handling a dilacerated root ("looping"), he should refer you to a specialist.
 
brit

brit

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My concern came about when Dr. XXX said he can ONLY drill straight, but he said the the canal loops to the left??? My guess is, does this mean he won't be able to clean out the entire RC? Possibly haven't an infection later and more money out of pocket for more teeth work? :cry:

I would be very concerned about this. You have endodontists on every corner in the USA, go and make the most of their expertise if you want the best chance of keeping your tooth.

 
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SmartDriver

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Thank you so much for your answers, brit and decan.

Now I am wondering, after my RC, I was told by the endo office clerk that I needed a crown, but after my RC heals in 1-2 weeks or do I have to get it done immediately after RC? Because if a wait, won't I be prone to braking or chipping the tooth if I were to bite on it by accident and it would be tricky to eat for those 1-2 weeks, so do I have to wait for the RC to heal a bit or can crown the tooth immediately?
 
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norwegianchick

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I just wanted to add: Even when the RCT of your tooth is an easy, it's still worth getting it done by an endodontist. They do them all day, so they'll be able to do it fast, and they have experience in anesthetizing teeth properly, so you'll be comfortable.

;)
 
brit

brit

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I have always waited for the tooth to truly settle down before doing a crown. Think of the crown as a moneyspinner for the dentist particularly if they have referred you for the actual rct. There is a risk of breakage but it varies in each situation. One molar of mine survived 20 years after a substandard rct before it was re-treated and later crowned.
Make sure the dentist takes your tooth 'out of bite' whilst you are waiting for the crown. That reduces the forces on it. Also make sure the tooth is left with a permanent restoration by the endo.

Don't know how common they are but 3/4 crowns or onlays are sometimes suggested so as to preserve tooth structure. If it is a back molar the most tooth structure is preserved by using gold rather than porcelain or porcelain fused to gold/metal for the crown.
 
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