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root canal surprise

Y

yogamom

Junior member
Joined
Oct 31, 2012
Messages
2
Hi,

Just back from a routine dental visit, where I was told I had a tooth with irreversible pulpitis (sp?) and would need a root canal on an upper back molar. I was totally surprised, as I have not had any problems with this tooth, although it has a very old silver filling in it.

Here are my questions:

1. Should I go ahead and have the root canal without having had any problems? My dentist is strongly suggesting it to head off what he says might be an infection down the road and lots of pain. It seems like a big investment (root canal and crown) for something that hasn't been bothering me. I felt a little pressured. Any big deal to hold off on this?

2. I am a total wimp about the numbing. How many, and what kind of injections are needed for a root canal on an upper molar? Will it be painful?

3. I asked about a steel crown since this is in the very back and barely visible, and my budget is really tight. My dentist says I would be very unhappy with this, and that "nobody" does these anymore. I have several friends with steel crowns so I know I could get one, but I like my dentist, and don't really want to go to someone else.

Thanks for any and all comments.
 
D

DrK

Guest
Your dentist is certainly right about one thing: pulpitis can be painful down the road! Better to take care of it now than to wait until it is a serious problem. However, it may not hurt to get a second opinion on whether or not you are actually dealing with irreversible pulpitis. If you are, you will want to get this problem rectified sooner rather than later; this is not to say, however, that you need to get it taken care of immediately.

As for your question of "how many injections" - well, it will basically come down to the quality and type of anesthetic used. But suffice it to say, they will use enough that you will not feel a thing. The root canal will not be painful during the procedure itself; afterward, however, is a different story. Your dentist will prescribe pain medicine, but many people still complain about pain following a root canal.

And as far as stainless steel crowns go...well, they are typically used as a temporary measure. If your dentist recommends staying away from stainless steel crowns, your best bet may be simply to go with what he says.

Hope this helps.
~Dr. K
 
A

AbbyH85

Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2012
Messages
57
Hi,

Just back from a routine dental visit, where I was told I had a tooth with irreversible pulpitis (sp?) and would need a root canal on an upper back molar. I was totally surprised, as I have not had any problems with this tooth, although it has a very old silver filling in it.

Here are my questions:

1. Should I go ahead and have the root canal without having had any problems? My dentist is strongly suggesting it to head off what he says might be an infection down the road and lots of pain. It seems like a big investment (root canal and crown) for something that hasn't been bothering me. I felt a little pressured. Any big deal to hold off on this?

2. I am a total wimp about the numbing. How many, and what kind of injections are needed for a root canal on an upper molar? Will it be painful?

3. I asked about a steel crown since this is in the very back and barely visible, and my budget is really tight. My dentist says I would be very unhappy with this, and that "nobody" does these anymore. I have several friends with steel crowns so I know I could get one, but I like my dentist, and don't really want to go to someone else.

Thanks for any and all comments.
Not a dentist but I will give my 2 cents.
If it as pulpitis, it will eventually start hurting. So even though it is not bothering you now, you never know when it will. Nothing worse than a toothache on the weekend when no one is open.

The numbing is not bad, I just had to have 2 crowns done today and the took a while. I dont like the epinephrine in the regular shot, but I cant get completely numb with the anesthetic that does not have it. So my dentist does the first nerve block with the anesthetic with out the epi, and then just add a little bit of the anestetic with the epi. I think total I had four shots in 2 hours. To me it is waaaaaayyyyyy less painful to get a shot for a molar, I have hardly ever felt one after the put the gel on. I had to have 2 shots today on the roof of my mouth for teeth near the front, it takes all I have not to scream. They SUCK. (But only for a second, so anyone else reading this dont get scared)

I have a steele crown on a molar that I have had since I was 13. I'm now 27, It is still perfect! I have never had a porcline crown until today, so I really have no advice on those...

You will do great though, so dont stress. I'm sure a dentist will comment here soon to give you their thoughts.
 
B

Blue1bell

Member
Joined
Mar 28, 2011
Messages
23
I had my first root canal experience in June.

The numbing itself itsn't that bad, although I had to get 5 injections, but once I did I felt nothing.

You are a bit tender afterwards for a couple of days, but it will pass.

I have been fine since my root canal and would probably get it done again if needed.

Its not all that bad.
 
Y

yogamom

Junior member
Joined
Oct 31, 2012
Messages
2
Thanks for the replies.

Anyone else out there with steel crowns? I'm surprised they are discouraged because they are much less expensive and had been used for years before the porcelain.

Also, a little worried after reading one of the posts. Would an upper molar root canal need an injection in the roof of the mouth?

Thanks for your comments!
 
Gordon

Gordon

Administrator
Staff member
Verified dentist
Joined
Oct 25, 2005
Messages
6,194
SSCs are almost never used as permanent restorations because they fit poorly, leading to plaque trapping and secondary decay. A good cheaper alternative is a non-precious metal crown, they look a bit like white gold and fit quite nicely. Are you sure you're not seeing these in your friends' mouths?

You don't need a palatal injection for a molar root canal.
 
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