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Rubber dam

Kat75

Kat75

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 1, 2007
Messages
123
Location
VA, US (formerly UK)
Hi everyone, it's me again.

Well, I went in for my second root canal today, and it went okay.

I have read a lot about the procedure during the past few months, and my question is: Are rubber dams absolutely vital during the procedure?

My dentist does not use them.

I read that it's supposed to help keeping the tooth free from saliva, and therefore bacteria.

Can the root canal procedure be compromised without the use of a dam? Do most dentists use them?

Would be grateful for any answers, as always.

Katxx
 
Lexa

Lexa

Junior member
Joined
May 11, 2008
Messages
17
Location
EU
I've never had one (2 failed root canals - aha! now I found the reason why! j/k). I have actually never had a dentist who used that on me, throughout my fillings, root canals, extractions and implants. I only know how they look from pictures. :confused:
 
Mary

Mary

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 1, 2008
Messages
554
Location
California
I have had a total of 13 root canals(actually more allmost every tooth)and I have never had one used on me....but all of my root canals never had any problems...they were all sucesful(can't spell):XXLhug:
 
DrMike

DrMike

Well-known member
Verified dentist
Joined
Nov 6, 2005
Messages
552
Location
Glasgow
Occasinally dentists choose not to use rubber dam if they feel that they can keep the canal dry and saliva free.
In my opinion rubber dam should be used for every root canal as it also offers extra protection for the airway, and prevents the patient getting any of the 'irrigant' (solutions used to wash the canal) in their mouth.
If saliva does get into a tooth undergoing root canal, there is a much greater risk of it failing, as new bacteria can enter the canal and reinfect it.
Hope this answers your question!
Mike
 
Kat75

Kat75

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 1, 2007
Messages
123
Location
VA, US (formerly UK)
Thanks everyone for your replies.

At the moment I still have a temporary filling; I have to go back next week to have the tooth filed down and the impression for the crown taken.

I read on the internet that a rubber dam should be put in place before the filing of a tooth too, is this correct?

Should I mention this to my dentist?

And does it mean if he doesn't use a dam, he might not be as competent?

Katxx
 
Zzzdentist

Zzzdentist

Well-known member
Verified dentist
Joined
Oct 11, 2007
Messages
1,108
Location
Having a little bit of Gorgonzola with crackers!
I agree with Dr. Mike that rubber dams help greatly in isolating the area to be worked on, preventing materials from going where they shouldn't, and keeping a clean operating field. That being said, sometimes they do get in the way and other times it is nearly impossible to employ them without them creating more problems than they are worth.

It's really up to the dentist, but generally I do believe that the standard of care does encourage their use where ever possible and practical as they do provide many benefits. Personally, I try to use one whenever I can. Not using one doesn't necessarily tell much about a dentist's competence as long as they can complete the procedure and end up with a successful long lasting result.

I have been forced to do root canals without rubber dam on gaggers, and it's not something I like doing as it does lengthen the procedure and possibly compromise the result since it is difficult to control oral fluids from contaminating the site. As well, all small instruments require floss anchor ties to prevent them from going into bad places (eg. lungs, stomach, etc). Irrigants need to be very cautiously evacuated. Without the rubber dam, the inconvenience level goes way up for the dentist if they follow proper safety precautions.
 
C

clementia

Junior member
Joined
Feb 15, 2011
Messages
1
I think it is awful that dentists don't use rubber dams always. They keep the crud from going down one's throat among the other reasons listed. If I could find a dentist near me that still uses rubber dams I would drop the dentist I have and go to him/her. I also need a block to prop my mouth open, otherwise it hurts like heck to hold my mouth open long enough for a cleaning let alone a filling, and absolutely nobody offers one anymore. I asked my dentist for one and he had to send somebody off to find one, and then it wasn't even my size! I really hate it when I'm having a tooth drilled and all of the pieces go down my throat so that I must hold the back of my tongue up against my pallet in order to close off my throat. Then I must count on the vac sucking every bit from the back of my tongue. I believe it can make people seriously ill to get the infection they are drilliing out into our bloodstream/to force us to swallow it. I say shame on dentists who don't use rubber dams, unless the patient requests otherwise.:mad:
 
letsconnect

letsconnect

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 1, 2005
Messages
5,300
I believe it can make people seriously ill to get the infection they are drilliing out into our bloodstream/to force us to swallow it.
The bacteria get quickly neutralised by stomach acids, so this is not really a concern :).
 
K

K-Bird

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 29, 2010
Messages
481
I would do the right thing and have a rubber dam with a root canal...because I understand it's best...but as far as for fillings or anything else-you can shove the bite block and rubber dam where the sun don't shine...I would rather swallow a dental tool!!!! I hate,hate,hate,hate them!!!!!
 
O

olanda

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 20, 2009
Messages
193
i think that white fillings should always be placed with a rubber dam. they're very sensitive to moisture and might not last as long if the tooth isn't completely dry when they're applied. personally, following a couple of bad experiences, i'd NEVER have a WHITE filling without a rubber dam.
 
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