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Seeking currently available toothbrush as practical as before

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aDifferentLoginName

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Over the past decade or so, I've found that toothbrushes have become more and more exotic, taking on all sorts of colourful and riply shapes, with rubber bits here, grip treads there, etc. I have also found them to be increasingly inferior in terms of ease of manipulation to get the recommended flicking action.

I've tried various models from the pharmacies, but it started to look like I'd have to go through countless models before *possibly* finding one that is actually designed with practical usage in mind. I don't know what's driving this gamififcation of toothbrushes, but I was alarmed about the fact that I would no longer be able to get a useful working toothbrush. So I stockpiled. Then I ran out.

I thought that I was lucky that the model I stockpiled still seemed to be available. But even though it *seemed* to be the same model, they had changed the design. The neck was pathetically flimsy, so you couldn't actually control the flicking action. I contacted the manufacturer, and they basically were not making the old versions anymore: http://i57.tinypic.com/6drgw4.jpg. The left diagram is the new fangled useless one while the right diagram is the bygone useful one. Both Buttler-Gum/Sunstar model 461, but that's irrelevant now.

My dental hygenist was not able to recommend a good one. They don't actually control the supply side.

I was wondering if anyone else noticed the decline of toothbrushes, and whether they know of a decent one that is still on the market? I should add that if the response is that I should move to a electric rotar brush, I use both. I would like to continue using both.
 
Angeldove

Angeldove

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I haven't had any issues with Oral B products - I was using a regular toothbrush from them and it worked really well (wasn't flimsy and I was able to hold it well) and I switched over to using one of their electronic toothbrushes and I like it a lot too.
 
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aDifferentLoginName

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Thanks. I will look into it this weekend. I would like to keep this thread open in case anyone else chimes in. Ideally, someone recognizes the brushes I used, and will recognize *exactly* what I'm talking about. Maybe have a suggestion or two.
 
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aDifferentLoginName

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I took a look at the Oral B's and the wavy smooth shapes made me less than confident about it. Perhaps it depends on the size of one's hand, but I've found the best shapes are the *old* designs that have no waviness, and are not wavy along the length of the handle. Such designs are no longer available on shelves these days. After confiding with my dental hygenist with my forlorn situation, she recommended Curaprox. I never heard of it before, and for good reason. It's not on the shelves either, and it's not even clear that I can have them ordered. I will find out tomorrow. And to be sure, even if I can order them, I don't know whether I will like the design. I will likely find out in a few weeks time when I get my hands on one.
 
Angeldove

Angeldove

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This is the one that I use - it has a flat head of bristles (none are curved). I'm really happy with how it has worked and my teeth are whiter and gums are a nicer pink color since I started using it (I do not use any whitening products in my mouth because of how it irritates my mouth).

[broken link removed]

The brush heads are not too expensive (the ones I purchased have blue bristles that turn white when it is time to replace them) and you just have to replace the batteries 2-3 times a year (I got mine in March and I think I will have to replace the batteries in a week or two).
 
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Angeldove

Angeldove

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Not sure where you live, but if you live in the US we have a store called Whole Foods that has more "natural" products. They might have a similar toothbrush to what you're use to. Just some ideas :)
 
Angeldove

Angeldove

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Is the toothbrush you are looking for similar to this one? [broken link removed]
 
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aDifferentLoginName

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I'm actually looking for a non-rotary toothbrush to augment my rotary tooth brushing.

As for the classic Gum brush that you posted, the one I have in mind looks almost exactly like that, and it is Butler-Gum / Sun Star (one became the other). I don't know if I'm just remembering them with rose-coloured glasses, but they have been unavailable for many years. The one I'm looking for has a compact head and is classified as soft. In the absence of that product, I've found the brush in my original post to be OK, and that was with much experimentation (i.e. buy, try, and throw out). Since you found the green one online, I will inquire about the possibility of ordering them. I'm in Ottawa, ON, Canada. Thank you!

P.S. We do have a Whole Foods chain in town. It's considered up-scale. 25 minutes walk down the road. I shall pop in to check their tooth brush offerings. Never realized that they were so diversified in the kinds of things that they carry.
 
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aDifferentLoginName

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Here's the saga so far. I picked up a curaprox toothbrush in a neighbouring province. The verdict? It does not address my problem of rotating the toothbrush in the recommended manner (sweeping motion from the gumline toward the biting surface). It still feels awkward, as if I have very little levearage and control. I should clarify that I find this problem specifically when brushing the inside surfaces of teeth on the lower right jaw. (I'm right handed).

However, I found a solution. Simply use the left hand. I found that this doesn't take too much effort to get use to. In fact, maybe this was the intent of modern day toothbrush designers. And it is apparently good for staving off dementia to get out of one's congitive comfort zone.

Having found this solution, I don't think it will be necessary to follow up with the Butler Gum Classic toothbrush. None of the pharmacies in my hood are able to order them anyway, and I didn't much like the idea of paying an order of magnitude more than the cost of a toothbrush to ship it to my home. And that's just to test it and determine whether they are as good as I remember.

Thanks to Angeldove for ideas and leads on this thread.
 
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aDifferentLoginName

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Just an update on the toothbrush saga. After trying the Curaprox brush and not being satisfied, I tried the Gum Classic SKU# 311PC-C. I ordered 20 in order to get free shipping. What I did *not* notice was that when I selected the compact head and soft bristles options, the title at the top changed to sku# 409PC (though the URL remained 311pc-c!!). So I ended up ordering skads of huge-headed toothbrushes. Fortunately, they accepted them back and sent me the right ones.

Unfortunately, the 409PCs aren't quite as good as I recall. The brush handles are too short. They might be for kids. And they aren't quite as easy to manipulate as I seemed to recall, at least for all areas of brushing. For my use, they are not better than the toothbrushes that I want to replace (the model that started this topic).

Oh well. I thank all those who chimed in.
 
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