• Dental Phobia Support

    Welcome! This is an online support group for anyone with a fear of the dentist, dental phobia, or specific dental fears.

    It's a supportive space to talk to people with similar experiences, and get advice and information.

    Register now to access all the features of the forum.

sheer terror about upcoming extraction

carole

carole

Well-known member
Forum Buddy
Joined
Jan 5, 2012
Messages
7,744
Location
UK
Good luck I would be as afraid as you, but I wish you Good Luck :clover::clover::clover: I am always afraid when I have to have something done, but do you know what?

It has always been okay and I have got through it.

Best Wishes :grouphug::grouphug::grouphug::grouphug::grouphug::grouphug::grouphug::grouphug::grouphug:
 
S

Sunny78

Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2012
Messages
38
Hello:

I had molar #15 extracted this morning. I have mixed feelings about the experience and will post about that later. I am relieved it's over; but I am still quite panicky over the post-op experience. That could be just that this is my first time at the rodeo. But the jury is still out about posting my experience under the "success stories."

I have some very basic questions about a couple of things. I'll ask them here, but if anyone thinks I should post them separately somewhere else, with specific headers, please let me know and I'll move them there. Also, what category should I put them in? These questions will make me look stupid, but I have to take that risk. This is the only place where I know won't be judged. Here goes:

--When they talk about "bleeding," just what does that mean? I have not had any bleeding or oozing. Not as in running out of my mouth or filling up my mouth. However, the gauze that I put in throughout the day, on top of the extraction site, putting pressure on it to stop the bleeding, still has red blood on it. Hours later.
From what I've read here and elsewhere, I got the idea that after about an hour there would no longer be blood on the gauze; that it would just be pink, a little blood mixed with saliva. I think the whole gauze and blood thing is a mystery. And I have contacted the oral surgeon's office. They don't think I have anything to worry about. That brings me to "the tea bag solution."

--When you dampen a tea bag for placement over the extraction site, to stop the bleeding, do you first enclose it within a thin piece of gauze or something--to keep the loose tea from getting into the site? Does this make sense?

Thanks, everyone!
Sunny, who has fingers and toes crossed the dreaded dry-socket syndrome doesn't start up this weekend.
 
carole

carole

Well-known member
Forum Buddy
Joined
Jan 5, 2012
Messages
7,744
Location
UK
I think they mean if you have blood oozing out of the site that you need to put a teabag or such over the extraction site. From what some people say on here you can get a bit of dribble blood on your pillow case. I have never had this as I stop bleeding before I leave the dentist office. Thank goodness, I do taste blood a bit, so I hope that helps. I know about the teabag thing but have never thought about it would need wrapping up, I don't think you do.

Congrats on going and getting it done :jump::jump::jump::cheer::cheer::cheer::jump::jump::jump: and get well soon.

Follow the after care instructions no sucking or smoking or spitting and tomorrow start with the salt water rinses, just let a teaspoon of salt melt in a glass of warm water and gently swish it around then let it dribble out of your mouth. After 72 hours you will be safe from dry socket. Happy healing :grouphug::grouphug::grouphug:
 
S

Sunny78

Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2012
Messages
38
I think they mean if you have blood oozing out of the site that you need to put a teabag or such over the extraction site. From what some people say on here you can get a bit of dribble blood on your pillow case. I have never had this as I stop bleeding before I leave the dentist office. Thank goodness, I do taste blood a bit, so I hope that helps. I know about the teabag thing but have never thought about it would need wrapping up, I don't think you do.

Congrats on going and getting it done :jump::jump::jump::cheer::cheer::cheer::jump::jump::jump: and get well soon.

Follow the after care instructions no sucking or smoking or spitting and tomorrow start with the salt water rinses, just let a teaspoon of salt melt in a glass of warm water and gently swish it around then let it dribble out of your mouth. After 72 hours you will be safe from dry socket. Happy healing :grouphug::grouphug::grouphug:

Thanks so much for the quick reply, Carole.
I am still confused about the blood part. When I took the initial gauze out--the one the surgeon put in and which I clamped down on for the requisite 45 minutes--there was blood on it. So I took that to mean I should repeat the procedure: more gauze; more pressure for 45minutes--until the gauze came out without any blood.
Well, you'd think the blood would have lessened throughout the day. But it did not. So I called the surgeon's office. His assistant dealt with me and acted like I was not understanding that I'd "just had surgery, and with surgery this is bound to be some bleeding."

At the end of the workday, when I spoke to her again, she said (when I asked) I didn't have to keep putting gauze in there; just to do so as needed. But because I had emphasized that the gauze all day contined to have blood--big bloodstains, she revised her instructions for "the day after" care. I am NOT to do the salt water rinse tomorrow; or brush any of my teeth; or rinse. And of course I won't be using a straw ever again (paranoid me; just kidding) and no sucking of course.

My surgeon told me that I had a pretty bad infection in the tooth (which I wasn't even aware of, since I had no pain with this tooth), so I have to take an antibiotic and rinse witih some prescription rinse (Chlorhexidine Gluconate). She told me how to do that.

She mentioned the teabag.

I feel very much "on my own." I know we all tell one another to "contact the dentist" for questions. But the truth is, they don't always respond the way we want them to.

He had to do stitches (dissolvable ones) and I was told they would go away on their own. I asked the assistant about how I was supposed to look for the blood clot, since it's impossible for me to really see the extraction site given it is in the very back. Since the site is so sore, I am terrified of doing something to make it bleed more and don't want to open my mouth wide on that side and probe and investigate. She told me i should NOT need to "look at it" and should not poke or prod. She also said I wouldn't be able to see the blood clot anyway, since it's "inside."

I am a very detailed person--someone who needs details to understand. When they explained what they were going to do and did do, it was in broader strokes than I am comfortable with. Since I know nothing about dental surgery, of course.

They acted like it was a pretty routine extraction; he did not have to break the tooth in two. It didn't take long; only about 15 minutes. And some of that time I believe was them cleaning out all of the "debris" from the infection. He didn't request that I come back for a checkup to see about the infection.

The more I read here and on other sites, I confess I am as confused sometimes by what appears to be conflicting info (because not all extractions are the same). Of course I am bolstered by a lot of the info, too.

Many thanks again for your support. I'm pretty blue about how rough today was, so when I'm feeling a little perkier I will write a report that I hope is helpful to others.

Sunny
 
carole

carole

Well-known member
Forum Buddy
Joined
Jan 5, 2012
Messages
7,744
Location
UK
From what you are saying it sounds like you can stop putting the lint rolls or teabags on the extraction site now.

I am not a dentist or medical in any way, I am hoping one of our dentists come on here soon and can give you proper advise.

I have had stitches that dissolve and they do just drop out when they are ready, I think between 7 and 10 days, but don't hold me to that. With you been stitched it isn't likely that you will get dry socket. I also think that you don't have to worry about any bleeding unless it is a lot, a lot being more than a teaspoon I think.

Follow the instructions that your dentist gave you and forget what I said, they know best. I am sorry I cannot be more help, I hope you feel better soon. :XXLhug::XXLhug::XXLhug:
 
S

Sunny78

Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2012
Messages
38
Thank you again, Carole. Really appreciate your support.

I'm glad to report that the surgeon's assistant called me again, about an hour ago. So she clearly
believed me when I told her I was concerned about the blood and explained this is my first
experience and I just don't have anything to compare it to. She did say I could brush the other
side of my mouth starting tomorrow. I asked more about the procedure; he was able to just lift
the tooth out, so it was not a surgical procedure in that sense. I also told her I really want to be
able to come in at any time to have him look at the site to ensure it is healing properly and she said,
Absolutely, no problem. Well, that's a different tone altogether than how she was on the phone with
me earlier today. I think that's partly why i panicked so much. The surgeon, his assistant, and the
receptionist had all seemed quite nice and very professional at the beginning; then, once I left there,
I felt a little abandoned. They were cold and a little impatient with me. So I felt like I had no place
to go. Anyway, I am going to try not to worry about the blood. I have not put a gauze in for a few
hours now. And while I am trying hard not to probe the area with my tongue,I have accidentally had
a flash of what the area is like; and it seems like there is a big jagged edge or something. I feel like
something sometimes sticks a little bit in the back of my throat. I wonder if it is debris or something.
I so wish this had been a bottom molar, in the sense that it would be so easy to open up my mouth gently and take a peek. This back molar site is a real "no man's land." Honestly, I have no clue what's back there.
Sometimes ignorance is not all blissful.

Thank you again. And have a great weekend.......
 
carole

carole

Well-known member
Forum Buddy
Joined
Jan 5, 2012
Messages
7,744
Location
UK
I wonder if a bit from the stitch is touching the back of your mouth and causing you to feel like you have something on your throat. I am glad they assistant rang you back. I hope you feel better today, it is a big deal having a tooth out in that we don't know what to expect, and because we don't understand everything we do panic.

You will find that your jaw may ache for a few days but don't worry it will clear up soon. If you are worried do go and see the dentist and let him have a look, you are doing really well and it will be okay. But it can be quite alarming to experience the change in our mouth.

I wish you well let us know how you go on. I am putting a couple of links for you on what to eat, I hope it helps




:grouphug::grouphug::grouphug::grouphug::grouphug:
 
S

Sunny78

Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2012
Messages
38
Hi, Carole:
I hope you're having a good weekend.
Yes, I wondered also if the sticking-out "bits" could be stitches. In reading around on the Internet today I saw where someone else with an extraction had that; it was explained as the jagged bony edge that had supported
the tooth, and that it would smooth out over time. Today, I am not feeling any sticky bits.

The inside corner of my mouth, no man's land, where the extraction occurred is sore, really sore. I only need to take Advil when it morphs into a throbbing pain outside of my face. But to keep inflammation down, I am going to continue the Advil. I took six yesterday, the limit according to the directions on the box, and needed every one of them. Today so far I have had two.

I slept as "upright' as I could; woke up feeling fine. As the day lingered, the throbbing started. But it's contained by Advil. It doesn't alarm me.

No blood on the pillowcase this morning. No clue what would appear on a gauze if I stuck a gauze onto the site. I am not doing that.

I can relate to what you said about not liking to take medication. I do take it, but always worrying about side effects. They've got me doing that prescription rinse, which will stain your teeth ultimately; a strong antibiotic (Clindamycin) that's supposed to wreck your stomach; then, the Advil. I have not had to break open the Vicodin.

If dry rot sets in, I wonder if the Vicodin will help that until I have time to go to the oral surgeon's?

My face is a little swollen, I tihnk. I have iced it with a bag of frozen corn.

Really, today is much better than yesterday.

I am still afraid of complications--dry rot, of course--because of the bone graft part of the procedure. Scared I trusted him too much; didn't do the research and ask the questions I should have. They have not given me any post-op instructions for the bone graft. (That's why he did the stitches, apparently.) They did warn me the graft material can emerge like sand granules onto my tongue, and to not be alarmed. I'm frankly feeling foolish and worried that the bone graft aspect will cause problems. I took too much for granted that it was routine if you want an implant.

The oral surgeon I went to specializes in implants. My dentist laughed when I told her that; she said any dentist or oral surgeon can do an implant. But the guy I went to seems to have a track record for research, teaching on it, presentations, etc. I figured this is really his thing more than anything else, so that's why I went to him. I realized the downside is that he could be "implant happy" and aggressive about suggesting I do it. I would say he was aggressive about it, though not in a nasty way.

I just didn't think that my post-op experience would include worrying about the bone graft aspect; if it will lend itself to dry rot occurring; will I have to go back and have it removed, etc., etc.

So ... I am having a hard time accepting that feeling good TODAY means I'm out of the woods. I keep reading sagas online about people who had an extract, then bone graft the same day, and weeks later are having big problems. That's the bad side about reading on the Internet.

Now, as for food! Thank you so much for the links. I thoroughly enjoyed reading the comments and suggestions, especially from those of you from the UK. I'm a Yank, so Weetabix, that pudding you guys were talking about from your childhood, it all seems so exotic to me. I take it "jelly" is like "Jell-O"?

Thanks for the warning about baked beans and rice! I wouldn't have thought they were diabolical, but I will take your word for it.

I've had lukewarm oatmeal and scrambled eggs, softened low-fat cheese, overly cooked pasta (the opposite of "al dente"!), and some baby-food pouch thing they now sell, for moms on the go to give to kids; this one was broccoli pureed into an applesauce base. I realize now I have been eating actual food rather than liquid food. Hopefully, it didn't migrate to no man's land.

Thank you again for your kindness and support. You and this forum have been a real lifeline to me.
And when I think about how all I had was one tooth taken out and so many of you have had MULTIPLE procedures all in one visit, I feel silly. But applaud all of you for your courage.

Take care.
Sunny
 
carole

carole

Well-known member
Forum Buddy
Joined
Jan 5, 2012
Messages
7,744
Location
UK
I am glad you are feeling better, and as each day goes on it just keeps getting better. You have just had me rolling all over laughing :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:

can I just say it was DRY SOCKET you were afraid of getting :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO: because if it was dry rot you got in your mouth then you really would have problems :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:

Happy healing :grin::grin::grin:
 
S

Sunny78

Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2012
Messages
38
I am glad you are feeling better, and as each day goes on it just keeps getting better. You have just had me rolling all over laughing :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:

can I just say it was DRY SOCKET you were afraid of getting :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO: because if it was dry rot you got in your mouth then you really would have problems :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:

Happy healing :grin::grin::grin:

HI, Carole:
Well, as you can see from my other post, which you replied to, it does NOT "just keep getting better and better." That's been my problem: It has NOT been a nice, straight, upward path at all.

I deliberately call it dry rot sometimes; I just love word play. And sometimes I even refer to it as ROOT ROT.
Fortunately, I did not contract that. And I am very thankful that I DID read about that on the Internet; otherwise, I would not have known to be so careful. My dental hygienist (now retired, so I should say former hygienist) told me SHE contracted dry rot after her boss, my former dentist, extracted one of her teeth. That was the first I had heard of that phenomenon and it sounded horrible. She was in a lot of pain, had to call him in the middle of the night. I remember she told me his reaction to her was, "What have YOU done!" And I was bewildered he blamed HER. I now understand that she might have accidentally "done" or "not done" something to have caused the root rot problem. Still, it sounded very painful, and this woman was surprised herself at how bad it was.

So I am grateful to have read up about it here and elsewhere. For any upcoming extractions, I am going to be super super careful afterward. Even now, I am still scared to death of "a straw" whenever I drink something.
 
Top