tooth glue

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I have my lovely flipper :rolleyes: but it's flipping awful, the tooth is very pretty but the surround has got to go. I wonder does anyone know if I can make it be secure and work with one wire? This is my ideal because it makes it removeable and there's no possibility of me damaging my other teeth. Option 2 is to completely remove the support wires and make my own maryland bridge. My thought is to try to glue it to my side tooth which isn't real (Fiberglass composite resin stuff) so it wouldn't damage a real tooth. If I need to glue it both sides then I'd have to glue to a real tooth too. Now then can I buy the real glue that dentists use? What is it called? failing that I think araldite would work (2 part epoxy resin) I know it's strong because I once glued on a car headlight and it was still firmly in place years later when the car died! I've tried to find information about toxicity but duh people don't use it to glue teeth in so there isn't much out there :) I wouldn't need to use much and wouldn't swallow any once it's hardened it's hardened...........I'm thinking it would be fine.
Any Ideas :)
 
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The question is... what do you do if it all goes horribly wrong?

You were mentioning that you have a doctor (GP) whom you trust. Could you maybe ask your doctor for advice on what to do :)?

The other thing that's just occurred to me: maybe you feel that the ethics/law discussion in the "support" thread implies that you cannot get emergency treatment without agreeing to some comprehensive treatment plan. That isn't actually the case. It should be possible to get some sort of "emergency tooth" done. How exactly did that last dentist go about it (you were saying the tooth is too big, and even he said so)? Could you give some more details? Is it sort of a "standard-sized" flipper? Please explain :)!
 
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Err hello it has already gone horribly wrong!

Sorry I don't mean to be tetchy but losing the tooth means it's already gone horribly wrong and I'm just having one of those days with it, I haven't been crying too much recently, but this evening I had a nice relaxing bath and then looked at myself in the mirror :cry: :cry: :cry: and that was that started crying again, when I start I just can't stop for days. Tried again with the damn flipper and I just can't stand it and now I think my other front tooth is starting to move I suppose because of the gap it's just edging into it and I hate myself for being so shallow but it just feels like the end of the world and I know it's nothing really in the great scheme of things, My children are healthy other peoples are dying and I'm crying because I feel so ugly...........

And I suppose that the fact I haven't tried to glue it in yet shows I'm scared of causing more damage but at the same time I can't carry on like this really.

Doctor is over 1000 miles away I'm not on his books and you know what I reckon he'd say? 'you really need to see a dentist about this'!

So i'll cry a little more, think a little more, try to get my head round the fact my tooth is gone for good and then cry a bit more
 
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Anyone would feel upset in your situation - the fact that other people may be worse off doesn't make things right for you, and I really feel for you :cry:

I'm sorry I got the bit about the doctor wrong - I assumed that you had found a new doctor in France rather than in the UK :(

You know that flipper you got - is that some sort of "standard" flipper? I'm still wondering if it might be possible to get a more "bespoke" flipper, as obviously you can't wear this one.
 
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It is only a tooth :) I've been saying that to myself all night and I'm going to avoid the mirror today!

The flipper was made for me took him a week I think it's probably a 'very nice flipper' he took impressions of my mouth with some self setting gummy stuff first some gum coloured stuff then some blue stuff inside it, I really don't want to have to do that again it was horrid and I was just sure I was going to be sick and choke because of the stuff. I'm sure it is a good tooth it's just me who's crap, It sort of feels like a restrictive band running inside my mouth it's very difficult to explain the feeling using language that's why I want a tooth stuck on to my other stuck on tooth, I know it wouldn't be strong decorative would do for now :). I keep reading about advances is dentistry like the possibility of growing back teeth in five years time, that implants are getting smaller and more successful, laser and oxygen treatments for decay and fillings and I think things will get better and the options for someone like me will get better. I want a stick on tooth then I'll feel empowered enough to at least talk to a dentist about my options and possible treatment, I don't even feel like I can have a conversation at the moment, I'm even selfconscious when I talk to my animals! I want my gum disease treated I really want to keep the teeth I have left and I know I can handle that treatment with the right sort of dentist and low dose sedation. But I don't even have the confidence to go and look for a dentist at the moment. I'm living reclusively I used to go to the village most days to buy bread and chat to local people since this happened I don't I just go to the big supermarket every fortnight because I don't have to speak there. I stock up and spend the rest of my time in the house and it's really not good for me I have agrophobic tendancies and have fought to keep myself getting out and really I've done well and was fine but like this it's just too hard so I stay in
 
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"I'm sure it is a good tooth it's just me who's crap, It sort of feels like a restrictive band running inside my mouth"

As Gordon was explaining in "Your dentistry questions answered", it may be a case of the metal clasps having to be adjusted so they aren't gripping so tightly? This may be causing the discomfort. As you were saying yourself, there is a good possibility of causing more damage if you decided to resort to a DIY solution. Is it really worth taking the risk if there may be a relatively simple solution to the problem?

It's great to hear that you've been doing so well in overcoming your agoraphobic tendencies up until this tooth incident. I'm sure that can't have been easy - fair play to you!! Basically, it appears that your main problem right now is trying to work up the confidence to see a dentist and get some form of interim solution which will allow you to face the public again. Could your partner's support maybe help you with this?
 
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like I say I can't really describe the flipper syndrome in words, It's not that it come out or anything, the wires have been adjusted but I can not wear it, I feel it in my mouth days after I last tried to wear it, it's too big too intrusive affects 5 other teeth, what I really want is advice about stick in decorative teeth.............I have my stick on tooth it's fine no problem why can't I find another tooth stuck on to that one ok temporary but just to get me through?
 
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Could you post a picture anywhere of this "stick on tooth" and the flipper. I'm really having trouble trying to work out what you're describing :confused:
I could be a bit more helpful if I could understand your problem a wee bit better...

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Gordon
 
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Thanks!

The stick on tooth is stuck in! Have you heard of sticktech? The tooth was made in chair it's fiberglass/resin built and cured in less than an hour. I think it's finnish look at: http://www.sticktech.com/document.asp?i...p;pollId=8
If you search for sticktech you just get a home page that doesn't do anywhere but if you google for 'sticktech bridge' you get into their website and the is lots of info there.

As for the flipper it's prettty standard 2 wires either side tooth in the middle bit of plastic gum I will try to photograph it!

Please look at the sticktech stuff, if you are a dentist it's lovely for people like me, looks ok ish, so gentle and really not hurtful or difficult to do, If you could do this you could make me feel ok in 2 hours give me back my confidence and maybe get me in your chair for 'serious work' :) :) :)
 
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I see, I wish you'd said that in the first place :)
My experience of these things is that they work OK in the short term but they don't last forever. They also tend to work best right up till the first time they fail, after that they tend to last for shorter and shorter periods of time.
There is no way you can stick this back in by yourself. The tooth it's being attached to needs to be etched with a mild acid, then carefully washed and dried before bonding the fibre bridge back on. I couldn't do it in your house for you even with dental cements so there's zero chance of you managing it. Sorry. :redface:

There are a variety of different types of removable denture so a photo would be helpful.
 
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My sticktech tooth is fine I'm happy with it it causes no problems, I've had it for three years and I like it, It's the tooth next to it that is the problem the problem being that it's gone! and that is the one the flipper has been made for. I can't make my camera work but there's a picture of pretty much what I've got at: http://www.woodmandentistry.com/implant_s....html and it's the first image on that page.

And what I want is somebody to stick on another tooth attaching it to the one I've already got even if it's not likely to last long at least I'd look normal. And my gluing plan was to cut the tooth off the flipper and stick it to my sticktech tooth with araldite. If there was anyway I could make the flipper stay in with just one wire (the one that goes to the side) and get rid of the bit that goes behind my other front tooth it might be wearable.

Today I was reading that flippers can act as slow extraction devices because of the pull they put on the teeth they attach to?
 
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I see. More than one tooth on adhesive bridges simply won't work. There's too much stress for the adhesive to cope with. The whole thing would fail.

Partial dentures don't extract teeth, but unless patients keep them really clean they accumulate a lot of plaque around them which usually rapidly destroys the rest of the teeth. A depressingly large number of patients fail to keep them clean.

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Gordon
 
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I sort of see :)
When I got my stick on tooth I asked the dentist if it was a 'real' tooth or decorative she said it was mostly decorative, I've never used it as a tooth it just sits in my mouth looking relatively normal. Now I'm not sure I really understand, If I get a stick on tooth attached to my existing stick on tooth but don't use it as a tooth what's to fail? I suppose that it would be possible to stick it between the stick on tooth and my remaining tooth for more stability?

From your posts I get the feeling you are a dentist? What do I do? The flipper doesn't work. Bear in mind my limitations with regard to treatment but also how affected my quality of life/confidence is affected by my physical appearance and it is seriously affected. This isn't mean't to be a test or anything but I am so miserable and just want to look normal and any constructive suggestions would be so gratefully received. I'm not looking for the correct treatment I'm looking for a solution that I can deal with that has the end result of me looking human and being able to go outside again.
 
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And how do you keep stuff clean? I brush twice a day 5 mins minimum with a good electric toothbrush I don't eat sugar, sugary drinks or any of that stuff. I did floss every day but it seemed eventually to set up a really nasty infection so I stopped. In fact I don't have tooth decay but my gums are diseased and I don't know why and I don't know how to stop it. The teeth I have lost have fallen out as completely whole unblemished (apart from a bit of tartar) teeth, and the tooth I have with a hole in is a tooth that was filled when I was young. All of my teeth are strong whole teeth and yet I'm losing them why?
 
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I'm not a dentist (though you guessed correctly, Gordon is :)), but we're now in the territory of bonding the flipper tooth (or another replacement tooth) between the sticktooth and a real tooth. Now, we've established that this is not doable in a DIY setting (due to lack of etching and drying equipment, among other things). Even if you took extreme care not to use your teeth during the day and if you lived on a liquid diet, there's no guarantee you'd be able to keep this up while asleep. I doubt that anyone would agree to build you a non-removable "tooth" which might only last a few days. Sorry to be so unhelpful yet again:redface:.

It sounds like you're losing teeth because there's not enough bone left to support them. Decay is a separate phenomenon, so you can have perfectly healthy-looking teeth fall out.

There's quite a detailed description of why and how this happens at

http://www.perio.org...auses

From your description, it sounds like you cannot stop this by yourself at this stage :redface: You'll need to enlist the help of a periodontist or dentist if you want to stop it from getting worse.

What sort of procedures do you find invasive? Is there anything that can be done to make things more comfortable for you?
 
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The needle, the drill, the chair all of it!

The smell when I walk in the surgery gives me the heebeejeebies, Those chairs make me groan with utter complete dispair, That outfit they wear to my mind informs me that I'm in for a pretty awful time, The needles hurt me they give me nasty spasms, The sound of the drill makes me feel like I'm in a living nightmare.............Do I really need to go on?

Having said all that some of the people listed on this sites dental finder sound like they really do care and understand. I love the sound of this wand thing, the ozone thing and the air abrasion thing. If I could find somebody practicing like that there's a chance I could get through the door and if they could treat me on a sofa that would be good and if the dentist would just wear a frilly cooks apron over their normal clothes that would be cool and if they did home visits they could roll up without warning one evening when I've had a few glasses of wine and I'm relaxed in front of the TV that would be best of all. And even if I could help a bit you know hold the tools or something that would make me feel more in control.......I've sort of written this a bit toungue in cheek :) but it really would work for me. I just don't know how to even find a part of that here
 
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You were saying that the needles hurt you and give you nasty spasms. But a few days ago you said that you had a dentist 3 years ago who used numbing gel, was gentle and you were fine? Or did you experience spasms back then as well?

your "ideal" setting really reminded me of my own thoughts while working up the courage to make an appointment (a real deja-vu, actually). It may be tongue in cheek, but there's a lot of good ideas to be found there :). E.g.:

"And even if I could help a bit you know hold the tools or something that would make me feel more in control.......":

I've seen it mentioned on several websites that you should ask if you can hold the suction tool yourself whenever possible, to help you feel more in control and part of the process. So this might be doable.

"if they could treat me on a sofa that would be good and if the dentist would just wear a frilly cooks apron over their normal clothes that would be cool and if they did home visits they could roll up without warning one evening when I've had a few glasses of wine and I'm relaxed in front of the TV that would be best of all. ":

Basically, what you're saying is that the clinical, sterile setting and outfits terrify you? You'll find huge variations between dental practices in that regard. It's becoming increasingly common for dentists to wear "everyday clothes", but depending on where you are, you may not have that choice. It might help to bear in mind that they might prefer to wear everyday clothes, but that scrubs are simply easier to clean. Regarding the treatment room (and even the chair), again there are huge variations. Some look horribly clinical, others look rather comfortable. I feel sorry for any dentist having to work in the clinical-looking places, because it must make their job a lot harder. People do get nervous in those environments. Having a friend or family member present can help in making the atmosphere more like home if you can't find your "ideal" practice.

"The smell when I walk in the surgery gives me the heebeejeebies" - it's odd, the place I go sometimes has the smell and sometimes doesn't, but it's only ever in the waiting room (never in the actual treatment room). Lloyd (http://www.dentalfearcentral.com/distraction_dentistry.html) was mentioning that the smell is oil of cloves, I'm not sure if they're using something else instead or if the smell is covered up by some sort of air fresheners ??? Anyway, you're right, it's unnerving.

The needles: see my question above - have there been any occasions where the needle didn't hurt or give you spasms? This is most likely down to technique. The anaesthetic should be warmed and given slowly, and you shouldn't be able to feel more than a slight pinch with the numbing gel. In a lot of places, you have to ask for it.

The sound of the drill: have you tried using a CD-or MP3 player to drown out sounds?

The wand, healozone and air abrasion are cool little gadgets, but have their limitations. For example, the efficacy of healozone has yet to be proven beyond doubt.

Some of the things above are easily implemented, others (environment, cooperation on behalf of dentist) depend on location & money (i.e. how limited you are in your choice of dentist). And as always, it takes two to Tango. I don't know if any of this is of any use to you?

Another thing I'm wondering about: you were saying that you didn't return after your - successful - appointment 3 years ago because you were too scared by the prospect of having two teeth taken out. At the same time, you were describing the process of losing teeth "the natural way" (for want of a better expression) as "humm that's a misnomer they don't fall out they cause months of pain and eventually you can pull them out!"
What is it about having them taken out by someone else (which, objectively, is far less painful and over very quickly) that makes it so scary to contemplate? You don't need to answer this one - it's a rhetorical question. Tell me to shut up if this is getting too much (I'm not easily offended :)).
 
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The needle spasm thing didn't get it the first time I'd taken diazapam and the numbing gel and it wasn't too bad, but the next time I got the spasms. The dentist said it was because I was so tense or maybe it was just differnet tooth. The spasms I got the other week were the worst though.

You don't need to shut up unless I'm being to boring!

And this whole pulling teeth thing is so crazy I know how much it hurts to loose them and how long it takes. And I know the logic I can't believe I can be so cruel to myself that I have to suffer so bloody long. I guess it's the control thing letting somebody take away from me and effectively mutilate me or maybe it's connected to all the extractions I had when I was a child although they were all under general anaesthetic so really shouldn't have been traumatic. But maybe it was waking up without the teeth in pain etc...........who knows but it is a nightmare and I couldn't even contemplate an extraction at the moment.

On a positive note I posted this on a French forum today:
Bonjour a tous,
Je suis desole. Je suis anglais. je peu pas parle francais bien!

Je suis phobique de dentiste mais j'ai une problem parce-que j'ai perdu un dent et j'ai quelque probleme avec le dents.

Je cherche un dentiste pres de midi pyrennees qui peut m'aider.
Merci

Took me 2 days to get the courage and god only knows if I'll understand even if I get a reply :)
I do feel a bit lost really, the good thing about this site is it has shown me that there are some pretty ok dentists out there, I could definitely meet some of them for a chat, problem is travelling at least a thousand miles. I am limited by finances and family and I really need to find a dentist within a 3-4hr drive of here realistically and I've found in the past that distance can be a real good excuse for me not to go back.........if there is an excuse I can make I'll find it :D I reckon I should have married a dentist! no excuses then!
 
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I reckon I should have married a dentist! no excuses then!


Try the Toulouse personals ;) - only joking...

It's fantastic you managed to post on that forum - fair play to you :D! Let us know if you get any responses. You could also try the British Embassy in France - this may be a long shot, but they might be able to recommend someone in your region. I'm also wondering if there's much of an ex-pat community around Toulouse? I've never been there, so I don't know.

Regarding the extraction issue - it's easy to see how the events when you were a kid would have felt traumatic - and likening them to being effectively mutilated is not far-fetched. From your description of events, it sounds like no great effort was made to explain to you why this had to be done, nor was the treatment you received particularly empathetic. The fact that you were terrified of dentists (for whatever reasons) even before the hospital episode can't have helped.

There is one crucial difference between then and now, though - as a child, you didn't have any choice or say in the matter. You didn't choose to have a heap of teeth removed back then. Whereas now, having some teeth taken out in order to achieve a reasonably healthy mouth and stop the gum disease would be choice you make, for your own benefit. This is a far cry from "mutilation". It is also something you have control over.

Anyway - let us know what's happening re. the forum post!
 
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>>When I got my stick on tooth I asked the dentist if it was a 'real' tooth or decorative she said it was mostly decorative, I've never used it as a tooth it just sits in my mouth looking relatively normal. Now I'm not sure I really understand, If I get a stick on tooth attached to my existing stick on tooth but don't use it as a tooth what's to fail? I suppose that it would be possible to stick it between the stick on tooth and my remaining tooth for more stability? <<


What's to fail? Either the bond between the original stick on tooth and the real tooth, or the bond between the original stick on and the new stick on or possibly the real tooth will be damaged by having to support the load of 3 teeth instead of just one...

>>From your posts I get the feeling you are a dentist? What do I do?<<


Yeah, I thought that was common knowledge. I practice in the West of Scotland treating about 50% dental phobics and the rest patients with physical or mental disabilities.

>>The flipper doesn't work. Bear in mind my limitations with regard to treatment but also how affected my quality of life/confidence is affected by my physical appearance and it is seriously affected. This isn't mean't to be a test or anything but I am so miserable and just want to look normal and any constructive suggestions would be so gratefully received. I'm not looking for the correct treatment I'm looking for a solution that I can deal with that has the end result of me looking human and being able to go outside again.[/quote]

Well, you know the answer really, find a therapist to help you deal with your anxiety. Preferably one who has a tame dentist they use. Then work with them to find a solution. This situation has taken years to develop, it won't be fixable in just days, I'm sorry :cry:
 
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