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Trigger

G

geos

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 22, 2011
Messages
521
Location
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Hi,
I think one of my triggers at the dentist is having to keep the mouth open and having all those tools in. For almost 10 years now, I’ve had all my treatments with IV sedation. I seem to be ok during cleanings since the hygienist doesn’t seem to need to keep any tools in there for a long time. I was wondering if you would have suggestions of way to cope with this? I’m thinking maybe I could try and find a dentist to help me with this.

As a precision, when I was younger I always had more difficulties at the dentist than my sister. However, my mom and my dentist never told me they would always book a long appointment and do little at each appointment to help me cope with it. Last time I went to that dentist, she told me she would want to try oral sedative, but I moved to a different city.
In the new city, I booked an appointment where I ended up having too much work in one appointment and I had a panic attack. Afterwards I decided to see a dental anesthesiologist and he does all my treatments with IV sedation.
 
Last edited:
Enarete

Enarete

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Sep 18, 2017
Messages
2,999
Hi Geos,

I think finding out what exactly triggers you is a great start, so it is great you had found out. Knowing that a cleaning is ok for you is a good start too and you can use it as a baseline.

Is there any treatment you need currently and do you generally cope with check-ups without difficulty?

I believe that finding a kind caring dentist who is willing to help you and then going in really small steps from there, starting with things that you find easy going to more difficult things is the bulletproof way to go. With the right dentist you can also see whether there are some adjustments that would help you to get through the treatment, such as making sure you get a breather after a particula duration of a treatment that you agreed on. I also would say if you manage to get a cleaning then there certainly must be some amount of treatment you would be able to cope with as well. Coping with a cleaning actually is a huge thing! :you-rock:

Have you had a look around to see whether there is a nervous patient friendly dentist in your area?

All the best wishes
 
G

geos

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 22, 2011
Messages
521
Location
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Right now, I don’t think I’m in need of any treatment. I’m ok with check-ups, but I notice my dentist seems to prefer having me way lower then what my hygienist does, which I’m not a fan. Whatever type of appointment I have, I still get pretty nervous before going.

For some reason when I search for dentists that are good for anxious patients I keep getting dentists that are offering sedation. I’m not sure if I’m searching properly. There might be one office I could try. It’s a dentist who works with his 2 daughters who decided to follow his career path. They seem like pretty nice people and I know one of them works as the emergency dentist a few days a year for the local dental society.
 
Enarete

Enarete

Super Moderator
Staff member
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Sep 18, 2017
Messages
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Right now, I don’t think I’m in need of any treatment. I’m ok with check-ups, but I notice my dentist seems to prefer having me way lower then what my hygienist does which I’m not a fan
This is what I meant with adjustments. Have you ever talked about this with your dentist (just out of curiosity, I got that you would like to find a new one anyway)


Whatever type of appointment I have, I still get pretty nervous before going.
@Dr. Daniel once explained that there were two kinds of anxiety. One of them is the anxiety you have before going, the other one is the actual anxiety during the visit. These two are not related. So even if you can tolerate a treatment / exam / cleaning fairly well, the anxiety before that might stay (and probably will as the most people feel nervous before seeing a dentist, even if they wouldn't label themselves as phobic)

For some reason when I search for dentists that are good for anxious patients I keep getting dentists that are offering sedation. I’m not sure if I’m searching properly. There might be one office I could try. It’s a dentist who works with his 2 daughters who decided to follow his career path. They seem like pretty nice people and I know one of them works as the emergency dentist a few days a year for the local dental society.
There are surely practices who rely on "knocking people out" without investing in any further effort to put them at ease, but in general you can't really tell without getting in touch. Sedation belongs to the package of things to manage dental fear, however offering it doesn't exclude other things to help, such as being kind and caring, giving you a lot of time, planning treatment at your pace etc. Thinking of the dentists from our Advisory Board, they all offer sedation (and are ready to do their best to work with you in a way that makes you not needing it). I also know that some patients generally wouldn't make the step of getting in touch with a practice if they see you don't offer any form of sedation.

The best way to go would be to call / get in touch via email and ask about how they can help nervous patients. If they state sedation as the first / only thing, it's time to move on.

Keeping my fingers crossed for the practice you had chosen to be a lovely one so that you can make a fresh new start :)
 
Enarete

Enarete

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Sep 18, 2017
Messages
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One more thing.. what I see as the best sign of a practice being really interested in treating nervous patients is offering you a chat before wanting to do an exam. This can be in form of an email consultation with a dentist or a nurse or on the phone or simply making efforts to let you know that they do not hurry with an exam and will first want to get to know you..
 
Dr. Daniel

Dr. Daniel

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Verified dentist
Joined
Nov 2, 2010
Messages
1,952
Location
The Hague , Holland
Right now, I don’t think I’m in need of any treatment. I’m ok with check-ups, but I notice my dentist seems to prefer having me way lower then what my hygienist does, which I’m not a fan.
Taking the chair too much down till the head is lower than the legs, cause immediate rise in the blood pressure in the head and neck area. In addition, the heart starts pumping to compensate for this fast changes in the blood pressure and balance it back. I think finding a solution for that with a dentist. Some dentists bring their patients way back in order to see all the teeth without stretching the neck too much.
However, if the dentist is willing to work standing up, it will be possible to find the a comfortable chair-position for both patient and dentist. I suggest giving it a try and ask the dentist even by email to treat you standing up.
I talk about being treated in a semi-sitting positions in one of my video about comfortable breathing during a dental treatment.
 
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