• Welcome! This is a forum for anyone who is affected by a fear of the dentist, dental phobia, or specific dental fears.

    We are lucky to count a number of dentists among our members and moderators. Look out for the "Verified dentist" badges. If you are a dental professional who likes to help, please join our community!

    Register now to access many more features and forums!

Veneer come off

R

Rainbowtigger

Junior member
Joined
Feb 1, 2021
Messages
5
Location
UK
Can I use a diy kit to attach veneer?
I am a dentaphobic. I am absolutely petrified of the the dentist chair. I have the feeling that my throat is closing and this sets off a panic attack. Quite a few occasions I have had to get out of chair and go home.
My late husband was always allowed to come in with me and I have moved 250 miles from previous dentist who just ‘knew me’ has sadly passed away.
Please please help me. Can’t stop crying.
 
letsconnect

letsconnect

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 1, 2005
Messages
5,313
Hi Rainbowtigger:welcome:

you could try a denture adhesive like Fixodent to temporarily hold the veneer in (don't bite on it though and it probably shouldn't be left in overnight to prevent choking on it if it comes lose), or a temporary cement. We have a page on DIY dentistry, including an instructional video, here:


Maybe one of our dentists here has some more advice that's specific to veneers.

Sorry to hear about both your husband and your dentist passing away :(. Do you have anyone else who could come with you to support you and hold your hand? I'm sure you would be able to find another dentist who is kind, caring and accommodating, and who can help you. We have a step-by-step guide here which may be helpful:


Hang on in there 🤗
 
R

Rainbowtigger

Junior member
Joined
Feb 1, 2021
Messages
5
Location
UK
I’ve ordered these two. Have you ever heard of them. I am I UK.
 
R

Rainbowtigger

Junior member
Joined
Feb 1, 2021
Messages
5
Location
UK
Hi Rainbowtigger:welcome:

you could try a denture adhesive like Fixodent to temporarily hold the veneer in (don't bite on it though and it probably shouldn't be left in overnight to prevent choking on it if it comes lose), or a temporary cement. We have a page on DIY dentistry, including an instructional video, here:


Maybe one of our dentists here has some more advice that's specific to veneers.

Sorry to hear about both your husband and your dentist passing away :(. Do you have anyone else who could come with you to support you and hold your hand? I'm sure you would be able to find another dentist who is kind, caring and accommodating, and who can help you. We have a step-by-step guide here which may be helpful:


Hang on in there 🤗
Not sure how I’ve got this again.
Have you heard of either of the diy kits?
 
letsconnect

letsconnect

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 1, 2005
Messages
5,313
I hadn’t come across them before, but presumably, they work on the same principle as other temporary cements?
 
drhirst

drhirst

Super Moderator
Verified dentist
Joined
Dec 7, 2008
Messages
716
Location
Welwyn Garden City, UK
Hi Rainbowtigger,

I am really sorry you have lost such a supportive husband.

First off, a veneer falling off is unlikely to cause you any pain, and the remaining tooth is also most unlikely to deteriorate, so you don't have to rush into anything. Also, what with wearing masks, it's not such a cosmetic issue as it was pre-covid.

There is no need to temporarily stick it back on. The temporary dental cements suggested above would not work well as a veneer, unlike a full crown has not natural grip of its own and relies on a really strong glue to hold it on. These temporary cements are simply not strong enough.

Many people feel like you, and suddenly just want to get out of the chair. Now, this is not quite the same situation as yours but one of my patients has a routine, where, as soon as he has had the injection, he gets up and walks out the practice. 5 to 10 minutes later he comes back in and we get to work. It was strange at first but now it's just routine with him. It's no problem, it's just what works for him and I am just happy it works. If you can find a dentist who really cares about helping anxious patients, he will understand and accommodate you.

I think in your case, proceeding very slowly and letting you control the procedure, meaning having the ability to pause the procedure at any time will help with the panic attacks. If you were my patient, we would practice you indicating when to stop and then restart the treatment, until you are confident your wishes will be respected.

I hope the suggestions help a little. Please feel free to let us know how things are going. Everyone on this forum is here to help you chase away those tears.

Lincoln
 
Top