• Welcome to Dental Fear Central! This is a place for mutual support and any questions you may have that are related to dental phobia, fear or anxiety. It is run by volunteers with first-hand experience of dental phobia and anxiety together with dental practitioners who like to help. The "Verified dentist" badges will tell you whether an answer has been provided by a qualified dental practitioner. If you'd like to use all the features of this forum and share your own experiences, or if you are a dental professional who would like to contribute, register now.

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kittykat

Guest
I'm really glad everything has worked out for you :) I've heard from many people that it's the worst experience of their life, and it's nice to know that someone can say otherwise! I actually don't have to worry about this, as I found out today that I've only one wisdom tooth and it doesn't look like it'll cause problems in the future! (You should have seen the look on my face when I looked at the x-rays and said "OH MY GOD THERE'S ONLY ONE!?" :giggle:) Glad you're feeling ok and recovering well! :star::star::star:
 
Sironastar

Sironastar

Member
Joined
Jul 28, 2011
Messages
79
Location
NORTH WALES
Thanks so much for sharing this as I will be opting for IV sedation too.
 
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tabatha7

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 3, 2010
Messages
908
Location
US
and me three! :) and still scared out of my mind.
 
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tabatha7

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 3, 2010
Messages
908
Location
US
Ink, I wish you were still around. I would love to ask you more about your procedure. It encourages me that you didn't feel any pain when they did the bone removal.
 
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anxiousgirl83

Member
Joined
Feb 1, 2013
Messages
23
Location
USA
This is exactly what I needed to find on the internet :)
Before finding this site all I found were horror stories and all that, feeling much better now :)
Wish me luck tomorrow morn!!!
I ll keep on reading the good stories :)
 
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anxiousgirl83

Member
Joined
Feb 1, 2013
Messages
23
Location
USA
It s soooo good to hear all these good stories :)
I m having 3 wisdom teeth removed tomorrow morn, I m having IV sedation so I hope I don t feel or remember much about it :)
Hope I can post my success story soon!!

Leslie
 
carole

carole

Super Moderator
Joined
Jan 5, 2012
Messages
7,921
Location
UK
It s soooo good to hear all these good stories :)
I m having 3 wisdom teeth removed tomorrow morn, I m having IV sedation so I hope I don t feel or remember much about it :)
Hope I can post my success story soon!!

Leslie

You will good luck :clover::clover::clover::clover::clover::clover::XXLhug::XXLhug::XXLhug:
 
J

Jandy19

Junior member
Joined
May 21, 2013
Messages
1
Thanks so much for posting your story. I am going to for the operation on Thursday. I am having all 4 removed and was really worried but your story has been a real help. Thanks x
 
carole

carole

Super Moderator
Joined
Jan 5, 2012
Messages
7,921
Location
UK
Hi jandy19 :welcome: to the forum.

I would like to wish you GOOD LUCK :clover::clover::clover::clover::clover: for Thursday, let us know how you get on when you feel up to it. :grouphug::grouphug::grouphug::hug5::butterfly:
 
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MaggieJohnson

Junior member
Joined
Jun 24, 2013
Messages
1
Finally got the little bugger taken out :)

After 16 years of avoiding it I finally got my upper wisdom tooth removed this morning. I was absolutely terrified to the point of throwing up before my appt but it really wasn't bad at all. My tooth was fully erupted and straight but had a massive cavity on the back so it needed to go. After being hooked up to the nitrous (which I had never tried before and fully recommend) I was nice and relaxed and didn't really care what happened to me after that.I received a few freezing needles and then it was literally seconds from the time he touched my tooth to it being out. I am now happily back at home and the freezing is starting to go. So far I am not in any pain. :)
 
carole

carole

Super Moderator
Joined
Jan 5, 2012
Messages
7,921
Location
UK
Hi Maggie I nearly didn't see this, I would like to say :welcome: to the forum.

I am so pleased that you have had this extraction done after suffering for so many years. I am also pleased that it was a positive experience for you too.

Congratulations :jump::jump::jump::cheer::cheer::cheer::cheer2::cheer2::cheer2::cheer::cheer::cheer::dance2::dance2::dance2::thumbsup::yayy::wow::perfect::star::star::star::butterfly:

Thank you for telling us of your experience it will help others that are afraid and may have their minds put to rest a bit by reading about what happened to you, and how easy it turned out to be.

Happy healing :D:D:D
 
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m4rci4

Junior member
Joined
Sep 12, 2013
Messages
2
Hiccupod-Thank you very much for posting about your experience. How old were you when you had the surgery? I'm 43, and have read horrible things about wisdom teeth extraction later in life...All 4 of mine are impacted, and the bottom two have damaged the 2 molars in front of them, so I am scheduled to have 6 teeth removed...:o So...I have a few questions still...

Were yours all impacted? What kind of medicine did they give you for recovery? How bad was your swelling and how long did it last? When were you able to function normally again (like going out in public, driving, etc.)? Why did you have to sleep sitting up?

Any info you have is greatly appreciated! Thanks!!!
 
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bresle

Junior member
Joined
Jun 5, 2014
Messages
5
I did it!! 4 wizzies under general

Well I did it! I was very nervous in the weeks leading up to my wisdom teeth extraction. I had anxiety over many aspects of it, especially the idea of my whole mouth being numb for an extended period of time. Finally, the day before surgery I talked to the surgical coordinator about my numbness fears and she had the dr use a shorting acting agent. This helped me a lot. I was terrified when the moment came down to sit in the chair and I bawled like a baby. They put the monitors on me, started my IV and I think they put meds in it then told me I'd be feeling relaxed soon and the once nurse said "when you see my ceiling move I'll see you when you wake up".Everyone was very supportive and nice and before I knew it I was out and the next thing I know I was in the car with my husband. Pain has been tolerable and really not too bad. No swelling so far but it's been only about 24 hours. Thank you all for your support this website helped me leading up to my surgery. Overall I am so immensely happy that I faced my fear and got it over with. I feel like a million dollars :):):) if anyone has any questions please feel free to ask
 
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SavedbyGrace

Junior member
Joined
Aug 15, 2014
Messages
1
I canceled 4 appointments to have my wisdom teeth removed because of pure and utter fear. When the last time I went to the dentist he told me if I did not follow thru this time my molar was also going to decay and worse. So I knew I had no choice and immediately got sick to my stomach. He had to schedule it 2 weeks out. The 1st week I tried dealing with it on my own, like a real man, big tough guy right? WRONG. After the 2nd week I had to see a doctor and he prescribed me anti anxiety meds. I also found this site and the success stories put me at ease. I am a man of my word and I swore to add my story if I made it through. The doc told me I couldnt take my meds the day of so I took them at 1159pm the night before and figured I would tough it out or go screaming right out of the office if I made it there. I spoke to the receptionist the night before and said I do not want to see anything, feel anything, or hear anything when I got in the room. I took my mp3 player and listened to music. As soon as I got in the room they sat me down gave me the iv and I woke up. I didnt feel anything. I was still listening to music and it was the best experience I have ever had. Believe me if I had to I would go back right now and do it again. Im recovering so well it doesn't even feel like anything happened. It was better than a cleaning and I like those. Thank you all for posting yout testimonials, they truly helped me and I will never be scared to go to the dentist again.
 
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mijitninja

Junior member
Joined
Oct 14, 2014
Messages
4
Wisdom Success! major phobia...

This friday on the 10th i chose the worst weekend to get my 4 wisdoms removed no thanks giving supper fo rme :( I have a petrifying fear of dentists and needles and dentists. After talking to my dentists we decided IV sedation was the best way to go! The day of when i went to the dentist my boyfriend brought me there and when i got into the chiar i was a grown A$$ women crying in a chair because i was about to get them removed and get a needle. I barely felt a thing for IV and when he put the sedation in the next thing i can remember is waking up in my bed at my house with a ton of post sedation selfies on my phone. 3 days later i am feeling great eating smoked salmon with no pain. Getting them removed was alot easier simple and painless then alot of people were telling me. Now to recover and get back to rugby!
 
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scottie

Junior member
Joined
Oct 28, 2014
Messages
14
Wisdom tooth extraction!

Hi guys, I stumbled on this site in my search for reassurance. I have had my top right wisdom tooth giving me some trouble for about a year, and have been "making do" with it, convincing myself that I can deal with it, instead of the alternative, which "to do" something about it.

I spoke and asked everyone that would listen about wisdom teeth extractions, and looked on every site possible, finding all the "horror stories", and making myself even more frightened. Sure there are rare situations that can happen but there are usually many other factors related to why things can go wrong etc.

So after such a long time, I had to make a decision, and the first thing I did, was to speak to a few different dentist to find one that made me feel comfortable and took the time to explain what and how he would treat the problem/extraction.

By this stage I had worked my self up into such a state that in my mind it had become a really big deal, as I think most people who get anxious about these things do.

So here's the think. This morning I had my wisdom tooth extracted!

I went in and saw my dentist and he gave me a local. (No IV, Did not get sedation), I took a small dose of Valium before it to calm me down. Then he reached in, and wiggled my tooth with his metalic spatula thing, while I kept my eyes closed. He then turned around, and I thought he was reaching for another tool, so I asked "What's happening?" And he said "it's done!" That was it! The extraction took about 45 seconds.

It hurt less than getting a filling. I cannot believe I got so worked up! So guys, I know it sounds scary but it's seriously ok. You don't need to be a "make do", you can be a "to do".

Mine was done about 6 ours ago, and the local has well and truelly wore off, but it's managable pain. It's not horrible pain, I just took some over the counter painkillers now.

I hope this lessens someones anxiety just a little.

Thanks
 
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lola42

Junior member
Joined
Dec 2, 2014
Messages
1
Wisdom Teeth After 40

I am 42 years old and had all 4 of my wisdom teeth removed yesterday without any problems. I put off doing the procedure out of fear for many, many years! My biggest concern was that the procedure would be more difficult and/or have complications due to my age. The reason I had to have them removed was that 1)I had a infection in the gum near one a few months ago and 2) two had a cavity.

I am writing to let people know the procedure was not that bad! I had the option of listening to my iPod or the Pandora station in the room - I opted for Pandora. I tried using nitrous oxide in the beginning, but did not like the feel of the tube on my nose. So instead the procedure was done with Novocain only. I felt small pinches when they administered the Novocain, but after that did not feel ANY pain. A dental dam was not used and I was grateful, as I don't like the "claustrophobic" feeling of too many things on my face/mouth. There was some pressure at times, but the Dr. always let me know before it would happen. My top two teeth were fully erupted, and therefore were removed very quickly. The bottom two were not impacted, but were not fully erupted either. The bottom two teeth were a bit more involved and required a tool that sounded a bit like a drill to ease them out - not painful at all, just could hear the sound of the tool. All in all, the teeth were removed and sutured up in about 45 minutes!! Yesterday I was numb, slowly got back feeling during the day. I took it easy, iced my face and used some gauze in my mouth. Today, the pain is minimal, along with the help of Ibuprofen (600 mg) every 6 hours. My face is still a bit puffy, but I expect that to go down in a day or so. I return to the Dr. in a week to have the sutures removed.

In preparation for the procedure I read A LOT of stories online, most of which heightened my fears. I am writing today to let you know the procedure is not bad at all and you will be relieved when it is done and not have to worry about any future risks!! Hoping to share a positive story with those looking for advice, especially those in their 40s.
 
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bratsche

Junior member
Joined
Jan 16, 2015
Messages
1
I've gotten a lot of useful info off this forum, so I figured I'd just contribute a success story to help reassure other people that I guess often nothing goes awry.

I had all my wisdom teeth taken out 2 weeks ago under IV sedation on a sunny Friday morning. The lower two were horizontal and partially impacted, the top two fully erupted but the right one was extensively decayed and had cracked and broken down in at least 3 places, giving me an on and off toothache, and the left one was slightly broken as well (which was why my dentist had told me I really just had to have them out, and if I was doing it I might as well do the lowers too). I'm 35 years old, and had put off having them out earlier because the top two had been healthy previously, and the lower two had been completely impacted rather than partially impacted. But it seems that once you have partial eruption there is access to the mouth and it's likely to lead to trouble, and I decided everything should go.

I remember absolutely nothing from the procedure. A very mild prick from the IV, and one moment the dentist was counting to 20, and the next moment I was waking up with lots of gauze in my mouth. I was slightly groggy but not loopy or anything. Since then it's been a textbook recovery, I was on ibuprofen for maybe the first week. I only tried taking the oxycodone once, and it just made me nauseous so I didn't use it again. I don't think I really needed it anyway. The holes on the top seem already pretty well filled in, and I never did have any holes on the bottom because everything was stitched closed and seems to have healed up pretty much the way they were put back together. I had no hint of a dry socket, though I had my fair share of paranoia and insane googling. About the 6th day or so I went back on solid food, though I suspect I probably could have done that earlier but I just didn't want to risk disturbing the blood clots too early.

So, it's really nice not to have that on and off toothache anymore (which also came with heat and cold sensitivity), and I'm just really glad it's over and everything went well. Best wishes to everyone getting their wizzies removed! ;)
 
C

CheapLabor

Junior member
Joined
Jan 23, 2015
Messages
1
4 impacted wisdom teeth removed under GA - not so bad!

Hi all,


One of the big curses and blessings about the internet is the amount of information that's available. Leading up to my extraction yesterday I did the same thing a lot of us do: read stories on the internet, which didn't alleviate any anxiety I had. In fact, it may have made it worse! I wanted to share my story with you. I'll tell you up front: it’s a positive story and the whole debacle turned out to be an incredibly easy experience. Hopefully this will make you feel better about an extraction you may be scheduled for.


A brief history: I hadn't been to the dentist for four years. I was self-employed at that time and, right or wrong, I couldn't justify the expense of an individual dental plan. The costs for those are nuts! My dental hygiene is only fair. There is a definite room for improvement. I brush and rinse regularly but flossing is extremely sporadic. I could definitely do myself several favors by reducing my sugar intake too, which I have begun doing more recently.


Anyway, after some occupational changes, I'm now working for an employer who provides a nice dental package and I contribute money into a Health Savings plan. I was waiting a few more paychecks before starting to schedule necessary appointments since I didn't want to pay out-of-pocket for any co-pays or deductibles, but then...


Last week I developed a toothache in the upper-right corner of my mouth. It was far and away the worst tooth pain I'd ever experienced. I couldn't concentrate, couldn't eat, and couldn't sleep. It was the kind of toothache that made you WANT to go the dentist, which says a lot. I called off work the next day and went to a dentist who gave me a panoramic x-ray. Here's what he found:


The crowns of my top two wisdom teeth had decayed to the point of falling off and the gum had grown back over. The dentist said this was rare and potentially dangerous as the decay and bad bacteria were now "sealed" into the gum. He prescribed an aggressive regimen of Amoxicillin to begin combating the pain-causing infection, and the toothache disappeared in less than a day.


My lower-right wisdom tooth proved not to be so wise - it was sitting horizontally underneath my gum line. My lower-left wisdom tooth had protruded just fine, amazingly enough, but my dentist said it had a "BAC." BAC, by the way, stands for Big @$$ Cavity. Ultimately it was decided that this tooth would come out too. And that's how I got my recommendation to the oral surgeon!


This Monday I had a consultation with the oral surgeon. They explained the pros and cons of the oral surgery. Like any surgery, there are normal and unusual risks for complications. Like any doctor, these risks are explained to you in full. Hearing these risks will probably elevate your blood pressure. However, the surgeon said something at the end that was strangely soothing, "All surgery has risks. I'm required to educate you on those. Anything is possible, but that doesn't mean it’s likely. A vast majority of my patients do NOT experience ANY of these potential complications and, if they do, I address them quickly and appropriately. I just need you to call me if you think something is wrong. Even if it’s not, it’s better safe than sorry. You'll be just fine."


We also discussed numbing methods for surgery. The options were local anesthetic (numbing the area but staying awake for the procedure) and general anesthetic (where they operate while I take a doctor-induced nap). General anesthesia cost about $500 more but the doctor recommended it. He jokingly said, "I'm recommending this for two reasons: one, you don't have to be traumatized about sounds, smells, or by anything else you might see me have to do. Two: I don't have to deal with you if you freak out." This may have come off as crass, but this doctor and I shared a similar personality - we're sarcastic folks. Despite the extra cost, I opted for the general anesthesia because it sounded a lot easier for everyone involved.


My dental insurance through Guardian covered 80% of the entire procedure up to a maximum of $1,000. The out-of-pocket cost still ended up being $1,100. My invoice stated that all my wisdom teeth were impacted with three being "soft tissue extractions" and one reading "Difficult - Bony." That last extraction cost twice as much as the other extractions did individually. For the record: I live in extreme southwestern Michigan / Northern Indiana and I did not price shop for other surgeons so I don't know how this compares locally or nation-wide. Costs be damned, I'm not sure this is something you'd want to go to the "lowest bidder" for.


The surgery was scheduled for Thursday morning at 10:20 AM. I wanted to wait a week but that didn't work out well with my families or job's overall planning. Scheduling the surgery sooner turned out to be a positive thing to do. It gave me less time to develop anxiety, less time to freak myself out with internet stories, and less time to second-guess the decision.


The doctor said I couldn't eat or drink anything 6 hours prior to the procedure because this eliminated a vomiting risk under the general anesthetic. Scheduling in the morning proved wise as I was only awake for a couple of hours with having to feel hungry and thirsty.


When I arrived to the doctor's office we handled the payment, they had me empty my bladder, and they sat me down in a surgical room that closely resembled any other dentist office I'd been in. The dentist made casual conversation with me while he prepped for the general aesthetic. He applied some topical numbing gel to my arm where the needle would go, told me to clench a fist, and apparently he inserted the needle. Didn't feel a thing!

The dentist and I both turned out to casual drummers so we were discussing that while he prepped. He had just told me about this drum set he had recently purchased and I remember responding in an impressed fashion, and then I felt my eyes get unexpectedly heavy.


"Hey, doc. Did you juice me up already?"


"Little bit," he said.


And then I woke up in the recovery room. It was almost a shock. Was I done already? I could have sworn he didn't even put the needle in my arm yet! The recovery specialist told me to stay lying down for a few minutes as some folks develop nausea from the anesthetic. Luckily, I didn't experience anything like that. The bottom half of my face was still completely numb. I felt like I my bottom lip was sticking out in a pouting fashion but it wasn't. My tongue was numb, too, which was an odd sensation.

They gave me a damp cloth and some chap stick to clean up some dried blood on my bottom lip. The ice pack they provided didn't feel necessary with the intense numbness, but I used it anyway. The recovery specialist went through the after-care instructions with me and my girlfriend, which will be detailed in the next couple of paragraphs. After the instructions they sent us on our merry way. I almost biffed it upon standing up. Apparently I was a little groggier than my brain chose to believe. Anesthesia can be tricky that way.


After-care instructions were this:


  • Change gauze in mouth about 30 minutes, as needed, until bleeding has subsided.
  • In order to stop the bleeding the gauze must be bitten down on to apply pressure, which will allow the blood to clot.
  • Primarily a liquid diet for the first day. Soft foods for the next day and as long as needed. If feeling comfortable, can return to "normal" foods by day three. Hard foods such as candy, brittle, and chips should be avoided for at least the next week.
  • No brushing, rinsing, or spitting on the first day. Brushing and rinsing can be resumed on the second day but the extraction sites should be avoided while brushing.
  • Starting on day three the extraction sites must be regularly rinsed using lukewarm salt water and a plastic syringe with a curved "nose." This is to flush out food particles from the sites. This is only required for the bottom extraction sites but the doctor recommended doing the top extraction sites too.
  • No straws or smoking for at least three days. Up to a week if possible.
  • Self-dissolving stitches were used so no follow-up would be needed for removal. Hooray!


Medications prescribed:


  • The doctor encouraged me to finish my Amoxicillin regimen.
  • Hydrocodone for pain, as needed, every 4 - 6 hours.
  • Methylprednisolone to be taken as directed for 6 days. This was to curb / prevent swelling.
  • An antibiotic mouthwash to be used twice daily (after breakfast and before bed).


We stopped on the way home to fill the prescriptions and grab some lunch. I ended up getting a Frosty from Wendy's, which soothed my throat. I was a little bit of a drooling idiot trying to each ice cream with a spoon while my tongue and bottom lip were numb, but what else is new? I popped a painkiller, which was recommended by the doctor to "stay ahead of any potential pain. The painkillers did NOT make me sleepy, which was appreciated.


The numbness in my tongue lasted about 4 more hours and my bottom lip finally regained sensation after 6 hours. The gauze had to be changed regularly for about 6 hours before the bleeding stopped. Devoured some tomato soup, a Greek yogurt, and some applesauce. I popped another painkiller in the afternoon just to be safe and then one more before going to bed about 10PM last night.


Woke up this morning and felt just dandy. No pain or swelling to speak of so I passed on the painkillers. Used the oral rinse for the first time (with only hints of blood upon spitting out), brushed as normal (avoiding the extraction sites), took my Amoxicillin and also my swelling prevention pill, and then hopped on the computer to write this journal.


I do NOT have constant pain following the extractions. If I contort my mouth a certain way there is definitely "tenderness" at the extraction sites, which is to be expected. It is not severe. I'm still sticking with soft foods for today, as recommended, because I don't want to put the cart before the horse and end up inhibiting progress as a result. Told my girlfriend this morning that I could have easily gone back to work today if I hadn't taken the day off already.


The whole procedure took about 60 minutes from start to finish. I credit the doctors for doing such a great job and for making the process as easy and comforting as possible. The operation may have been made easier too by the fact my mouth was actually big enough to accommodate my wisdom teeth had they been healthy and come in properly. If only, right?

Here are my recommendations to hopefully make your procedure go as smoothly as possible for you:


  • Don't delay the procedure. Get it done and over with! Don't give yourself more time to become anxious.
  • Get all four extracted at once if possible. It saves cost and means you won't have to go back later.
  • General aesthetic is amazing and worth every penny of the additional cost.
  • Follow the doctor's instructions to the "T." Don't cheat.
  • Keep a positive mindset. I'm a big believer in "mind over matter." You can do this!
  • Know that any discomfort you feel afterward is NOTHING compared to the pain you would receive if the condition went unattended. You may have experienced this already.


As you can probably tell, I'm an overly talkative person. I'll be happy to answer any questions and, if requested, provide additional updates over the next few days.


Good luck with your procedures, everyone!


- Joe
 
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