Worried about forthcoming 2 hour and a half appointment...

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RustyRebecca

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Jan 16, 2019
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29
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Plymouth
After visiting the hygienist three times to contain my periodontal disease and also having at last the curved root out, my new dentist is to work on my front teeth. She will doing composite fillings on 6 of my teeth. So the front teeth minus the canines as I don't have any.
I am having inhalation sedation so that I feel more in control than IV sedation.
I wanted to ask if anyone has experienced inhalation sedation?
I am worried as I have never ever been in the dentist chair longer than 45 mins (and that was agonising to me).
What is involved with composite fillings (it says 3 surfaces) on my treatment plan? Will they look much better? I have a big gap between my front teeth (to me its too big). Can she fill this a bit during this appointment?
I am concerned as my front teeth have been slightly aching lately. I am worried that the gum disease is too advanced. I am just worried really about it all :(
My canines that I do not have...they say that the best I can have are implants (though these could fail due to bone loss, I know they can do bone placement). But I can't really afford implants. I can't wear a plate (as I have one and just can't wear it) and implants are so invasive which loads of healing time (apart from teeth in a day?). A bridge is out as had one before and it loosened my other teeth. Are there really no other options left?
Thank you
 
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Paige2018

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Mar 26, 2018
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Inhalation sedation is nitrous oxide (laughing gas). It will relax you, but you will be fully aware during the procedure. The composite filling entails The dentist drilling it out the decay on your tooth, prepping for the filling and putting composite material, which is tooth colored, and shaping it to match the area that is missing. They will “cure “it’ The dentist drilling it out the decay on your tooth, prepping for the filling and putting composite material, which is tooth colored, and shaping it to match the area that is missing. They will “cure “it, which means they will use a special light to harden it. After they are completed they will check your bites a couple of different times to make sure that it is comfortable for you. Depending on how deep the decay is depends on how long the fillings would take, but should not take more than 15 to 20 minutes for each tooth at the longest. Dentists can fill in gaps with the composite filling, but personally I am not a fan of those, as depending on if there is no decay, just to do the fill in the gap, if you bite on your front teeth, that composite filling can come off. In regards to your missing canine teeth unfortunately other than wearing a plates/denture, or bridge, which both you said you were not able to do, the other option would be implants.
I hope this helps, best of luck on your appointment!
 
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RustyRebecca

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Jan 16, 2019
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Location
Plymouth
Oh my God! That has definitely put me off. You meant this link; https://www.dentalfearcentral.org/help/sedation-dentistry/laughing-gas/
I have a phobia of nausea and vomiting and feeling lightheaded. And of being out of control.
That articles mentions all of this, and if the dentist doesn't get the mix right...no...God! I know it wears off but I am not prepared to risk all of that. I thought it was different to that, somehow.
I don't know how I am going to get through two and a half hours in the chair now because I will have to do it without sedation.
Think I will have to talk to my dentist.
 
Gordon

Gordon

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Oct 25, 2005
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You'll have plenty of warning that the mix is too strong before you start getting into the nausea stage, just stop breathing the gas for a minute and ask the dentist to turn it down a bit if you feel you're getting over sedated.

Dentists doing IS properly should increase the dose of nitrous slowly over a good few minutes, so the sedation effect builds up gradually.
 

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