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Worst case dentist has seen makes me terrified.

M

Moopants99

Junior member
Joined
Feb 17, 2015
Messages
1
I was told my lower wisdom teeth wouldn't bother me but on the one side especially they're hurting often. The dentist x-rayed my jaw and said they were both impacted with the right one deep in the bone & nowhere to go. The root is near the facial nerve and he explained the problem with this. He told me to remove the tooth would require removing the bone above it and due to the proximity to the nerve there may be temporary or permanent damage to it causing numbness. He said he would not do the operation himself and I'd need to go to a surgeon. There is an added problem in that I take DMARDS and Biologics for rheumatoid arthritis which suppress my immune system & put me at much higher infection risk post surgery and slower recovery/healing rate. I would probably have to stop taking these meds before the operation which means a likely return in the RA symptoms. He suggested I leave the tooth in place as long as I can and live with the pain. I'm sick of living in pain :(

as as I rely on NHS and I know there are huge waiting lists I'm worried the wait & see attitude will make things (ie the pain) worse but I know an operation is also extremely risky both in terms of nerve damage & infection risk. I'm also terrified by the idea of removing a bit of bone because on the X-ray it looked huge & it's right at the very back of my jaw so looks deep set.

is there anyone who can reassure me? Anyone on or with experience of similar medications? How long does the pain last after the operation? What would permanent nerve damage mean for me in real life?
 
carole

carole

Super Moderator
Joined
Jan 5, 2012
Messages
7,914
Location
UK
Hi :welcome: to the forum.

I am not a dentist and I don't have your condition. The only advise I can offer is to ask your dentist to refer you now because on the nhs things take time, I had an nhs referral and waited about 6 months to be seen at hospital. Once you have been seen then things move a bit faster but the initial appointment would be with a specialist that is used to dealing with wisdom teeth removal all the time and it is no big deal for them.

They would discuss with you how things would happen and how you may be effected, you need to keep in mind that they need to tell you what may happen as you have to give informed consent. To do this you need to know all the facts which often sound much worse to us than they are as problems are not the norm. You can also discuss the medication you are taking and they will know how to deal with this as they have a wide range of knowledge of medication as well. It may be that you won't need to stop taking your medication they would know and advise you.

You could also see your GP and discuss this with them, if you would need to stop your medication which I don't think you would have to, they may be able to prescribe something else in it's place.

There are dentists on this forum and they may be able to offer better advise than I have in respect of the medication side of things, they are very good but no one can tell you for sure how things will be after. The specialists are very good at preforming wisdom tooth extraction and what is a problem for your dentist would be routine for them. Try not to worry too much, I found that by seeing the specialists for my dental problems help a lot in terms or stress and worry. In my head, my problems were massive and they just dealt with all my concerns and had the answers to my questions. I was still nervous but a lot less than before I saw them. Things worked out fine for me the couple of times I had to attend the hospital dental department and it will for you too.

I hope this puts your mind at rest a bit :butterfly:
 
G

geos

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 22, 2011
Messages
474
Location
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
I don't know how the NHS works, but as Carole said, you are probably better to start the process now.

Regarding the medication you take, you can talk to the surgeon and the doctor who prescribed you that medication what is recommended and how to lower complications.

Personally, I was referred to a specialist regarding another issue by my orthodontist when I was younger. My orthodontist, one of the best in the region, identified 2 areas that would need to be seen by the specialist. The specialist said only one needed treatment. As Carole mentioned, those specialists treat multiple times a day people with more or less complicated situations. They know what they are doing and will do everything to lower any risk to the lowest point possible. Something your dentist finds complicated could be a regular procedure for a specialist who does them every day.

My experience is similar to Carole's, I find that the experience specialists have makes me calmer. I had a gum graft, but the specialist was so calm and effective, I was surprised of how quick and painless it was.
 
C

comfortdentist

Well-known member
Verified dentist
Joined
Jul 19, 2009
Messages
2,882
Location
Miami, Fl
In GENERAL:
may be possible to cut off the top part of the wisdom tooth and bury the root tips as an alternative
Better details on risk with CBCT cost 200-700 in USA dental offices
As to your immune response yes it is a consideration but I usually do surgery 2 weeks prior to the next immune suppressant dose when possible. Also consider doing one tooth at a time.
Typically optimize oral hygiene prior to surgery make sure you aren't getting sick, rinse with antimicrobial mouthwash, take antibiotics......
 
carole

carole

Super Moderator
Joined
Jan 5, 2012
Messages
7,914
Location
UK
I don't know how the NHS works, but as Carole said, you are probably better to start the process now.

Regarding the medication you take, you can talk to the surgeon and the doctor who prescribed you that medication what is recommended and how to lower complications.

Personally, I was referred to a specialist regarding another issue by my orthodontist when I was younger. My orthodontist, one of the best in the region, identified 2 areas that would need to be seen by the specialist. The specialist said only one needed treatment. As Carole mentioned, those specialists treat multiple times a day people with more or less complicated situations. They know what they are doing and will do everything to lower any risk to the lowest point possible. Something your dentist finds complicated could be a regular procedure for a specialist who does them every day.

My experience is similar to Carole's, I find that the experience specialists have makes me calmer. I had a gum graft, but the specialist was so calm and effective, I was surprised of how quick and painless it was.
The NHS is very similar to the way hospitals etc... are run in Canada, my son was in Vancouver a while back and test showed up a kidney problem, I of course was going out of my mind over how he would go on over there in respect of treatment and paying for it. I was due to see my own doctor here in the UK and when I told them about my son they said not to worry as Canada was much the same as here in treatment and there would be no charge.
As far as dentists go here there is a charge but on the nhs it isn't much compared to private charges and some people on benefits don't have to pay. I hope this helps you to understand the nhs geos a bit. :butterfly:
 
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