Least scary word for injection?

What is the least scary word for injection?

  • injection

    Votes: 4 8.7%
  • numbing shot

    Votes: 4 8.7%
  • jab

    Votes: 1 2.2%
  • to be numbed (i.e. try to avoid direct references)

    Votes: 30 65.2%
  • needle

    Votes: 1 2.2%
  • other (please reply in this thread to specify)

    Votes: 6 13.0%

  • Total voters
    46
Dr. Daniel

Dr. Daniel

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The word "anesthesia" is indeed medical and not in the common spoken language, unlike other words in dentistry which are much more friendly.
Here are several examples, the used word and the professional term:
filling=restoration:giggle:
wisdom tooth= third molar:giggle::giggle:
crown=partial irremovable dental prothesis:giggle::giggle::ROFLMAO:
 
R

RP

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I'll take anesthesia as my friend anyday over a restoration, partial irremovable dental prosthesis and losing a third molar.......:ROFLMAO:


The word "anesthesia" is indeed medical and not in the common spoken language, unlike other words in dentistry which are much more friendly.
Here are several examples, the used word and the professional term:
filling=restoration:giggle:
wisdom tooth= third molar:giggle::giggle:
crown=partial irremovable dental prothesis:giggle::giggle::ROFLMAO:
 
F

fox

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USA
Here are several examples, the used word and the professional term:
filling=restoration:giggle:
wisdom tooth= third molar:giggle::giggle:
crown=partial irremovable dental prothesis:giggle::giggle::ROFLMAO:
Is there going to be a test on this later? :o
I'll faint, I swear it. :giggle:
 
G

gettingthere

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This thread has been really interesting as it clearly shows that there is no easy answer or one word/phrase to which we will all react in the same way. I readily admit that I am in the minority with my dislike of "numb" and I do of course recognise that this word has to be used in discussion of such issues. Again though, it all comes down to previous experience. I personally have real control issues and equate the loss of sensation with loss of control and have also had a bad experience in the past with feelings of suffocation, not being able to swallow etc through numbness but readily concede that a more common problem that others may have experienced is not being properly aneasthetised therefore the feeling of complete numbness is actually a comfort. I look forward to a time where this experience catches up with me!

There is also a real difference between written and spoken language and although I have been very guilty of digressing into spoken preferences, the original question was about words to be used on the site and spoken language would be quite wrong here. I would certainly expect to see terms like "numb" "injection" "local anaesthetic" all used on the site as they are all relavent and informative but I think the mark of a good dentist would be to note how these - and other - words effect each individual patient in person and modify speech accordingly.

Brit, of course I agree that talk of "local anaesthetic" is completely inappropriate with children. Allowing a tooth to "go to sleep" is perfect and I wish my childhood dentist has spoke like this instead of looming over me saying "you'll get a big jag". Stupid woman - although she did always refer to cleanings as "tickling the teeth" so she obviously picked up on some instances of good practice. Sorry, I wasn't really thinking about children in my original repsonse but this is indeed a good point. And, when language like this is used by a skilled dentist who can also keep the needle out of the child's eyeline, the whole process becomes nothing to fear!

Clem, if you don't mind me saying, I think we are on a similar wavelength with regards our feelings towards injections and the language used to describe them. Personally, I think I am a bit too sensitive to what I perceive as patronising language which is why I would rather just use the correct terms rather than euphemisms. I would run a mile from any dentist telling me about happy, sleepy etc medicine as an adult but again this comes down to what I was saying about modifying speech to individual patients. I can fully recognise however that therre are a great deal of people - as other posters have demonstrated! - who find the clinical language too difficult to deal with and take comfort in euphemisms. The site obviously needs to present the facts and allow for both sides to be equally comforted - which I think is something that Letsconnect and others have already managed brilliantly.

As a slightly-related aside, I would also just say that faced with the prospect of an injection from my dentist, I might tremble a bit but experience has taught me that it is really nothing to fear so would not be too anxious. Faced with the same from a doctor/nurse I would run a mile and never look back. I caught an episode of Creature Comforts recently where the subject was health and one of the characters said that she didn't mind injections anywhere but the mouth, which she always found painful. Thought it was interesting as I am currently the opposite. Just goes to show how important technique and experience are.
 
Camisa

Camisa

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I'm not a majority...but I find the truth to be the least intimidating, because trust is so important. So, I call it Lido. Or Carbo, or Prilo, etc. depending on what is used. :)

"I'm going to get a dose of Lido."

It sounds the least intimidating to me.

Now if someone can make me stop being afraid of the local itself, that'd be awesome! lol
 
C

Clem

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Apr 24, 2006
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I guess my preferences stem from my profession, which requires use of exact terminology, no slop allowed. I like to know what's coming without it being steeped in gushy terms that don't mean anything and are often flatly insulting. But then, only so much info--I don't want to hear the word "needle", don't want to see it, don't want it in the room, hate the idea that minutes go by and I can't move or something awful happens--so anything that can sidestep those images for the duration is very welcome. Ick. Hate the whole situation.
 
Razzle3

Razzle3

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The scariest word is "needle" since they have always terrified and reigned some degree of control over me. As some of you know it was my root canal experience in April, 2009 that helped changed that. But, that story has long been told. I am now a firm believer in the "numbing gel." In regards to this question, I think the focus should be on the numbing/freezing gel and how that will allow the "needle" to not be painful. I think for some people with negative either dentist, or in my case doctor, shot experiences it would help for the dentist to verbally say (albeit obvious--I'd hope) that unless he/she knew I was totally numb and comfortable with proceeding he/she would not to so. That goes hand in hand. Long winded way of agreeing with RP that mutual respect and not patronizing the patient means everything.

It might also be beneficial to make use of calming techniques (breathing/music, etc) as needed. For kids, or adults (like me) who truly loathe any type of shot, perhaps a good idea (obviously after a relationship is established with the dentist that feels safe and trustworthy) would be to do a test run. Have the hygienist or even dentist liberally apply the gel, so you, the patient can "feel" that it works. Maybe for someone truly "brave," after getting to the place where you feel good about the gel, but still uncertain about the actual LA shot, ask for a practice (water or whatever) run of that, too. All these things will (hopefully) empower you, stengthen your belief in yourself, not to mention develop a trusting relationship with your dentist and their staff, but will also prevent anything (fear, old ghosts, needle phobia, whatever) from infringing on your smile.
 
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M

Murdoc

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Needle is fine, Im not really afraid of pain or sharp things. More afraid of humans and being touched as a whole.(have cut my own hair for over 10 years now)I am very afraid of dentist more than The usual things I'm afraid of(Im over dramatically afraid of a lot of things electric toothbrushes, hair clippers ect. I was once chased down a flight of stairs and almost tumbled down them when a friend of mine chased me with an electric toothbrush. ). Its not so much the wording(doesn't matter what you say I'm still not going to like it) but how its said. if i start to feel like I'm being forced to do something, i will start to panic and cry. I also can't stand when dentist used childish talk on me. my childhood dentist who caused me all this fear did that and it scares me. i felt like i was being lied to.
 
C

CollegeBound

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I don't see (in my world) a non-scary word for "injection". None of the tricky ways people say it relaxes me.
 
Ihatedentistss

Ihatedentistss

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Haha I definitely don't think it's "jab". Without directly mentioning it is probably best in my opinion :) a lot of us hear the word needle or shot and go into panic mode I think.
 
J

JJones86

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Hi.

The word 'numb' sounds the least threatening to me, but honestly there is no positive way of referring to an injection when you're needle phobic.

I've had dentists say to me 'Let's get you numbed up' so many times that even that phrase gives me a panic attack now.

I don't know of a good way to refer to injections. I prefer not to think about it and when I need it, to just get it over with as quickly and painlessly as possible.

I have very sensitive teeth and gums, so even when a dentist is gentle the injections hurt me. There's no way around it for me.

JJ
 
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C

CollegeBound

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Looking back now, I would like to change my answer.

Anesthesia is a scary word for me. I hate that word as much as I do dentist because I have had a lot of back surgeries throughout my life, and anesthesia makes me even more scared than the word injection or shot. Although I do not like injection or shot, at least I know that I can handle them without crying, unlike anesthesia. I always associate that word with "loss of control" and "that horrible groggy feeling".

One that I liked that I saw was "local" or "freezing the nerves". A little less threatening in my opinion.
 
S

Surreyvwphobic

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A very interesting debate this one. I had to face this yesterday (Thursday 16th August 2018 AD) and the language used in my case was getting numbed up and the emphasis on being that it would be much more comfortable than going without (which was perfectly true). Our coping methods involved the nurse holding my hand and speaking nice words along with the dentist (who also did simular). Having a numbing gel made a huge difference as well, as any pricking sensation was swiftly eliminated with this new technique. An absolute godsend for the industry in my opinion. At the end of the day, it is basically down to having trust in a kind person who exudes confidence in everything they do.
 

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